Introduction

Enermax LIQTECH II 360 AIO Cooler in the retail packaging box

Today marks the first review that we will be using our new AIO test platform that is capable of putting out enough heat to make them sweat to test liquid cooling for CPUs. On the bench today is the Enermax LIQTECH II 360 cooler (ELC-LTTO360-TBP) which was the inspiration for our test platform as it plainly states on the box and on its product literature that it is capable of handling a “500W+ TDP.” It’s always a challenge to let a bold marketing claim walk past without having the urge to validate it, so that is what we shall do in this review.

Enermax LIQTECH II 360 Overview

The Enermax LIQTECH II 360 AIO cooler is an all in one CPU cooler that is designed to work on a wide variety of sockets, including Intel’s LGA 2066/2011-3/2011/1366/1156/1155/1151/1150 and AMD’s AM4/AM3+/AM3/AM2+/AM2/FM2+/FM2/FM1. It is geared for the high-end desktop processors. While Enermax claims universal socket compatibility, it is not compatible with the Threadripper’s sTR4 socket as they manufacture a Threadripper specific line of LIQTECH II coolers. The tubes connecting the water block to the radiator measure 400mm.

Aurabelt RGB Water Block

Enermax Shunt Channel Technology demonstration
Image Credit: Enermax

The water block features a patented Shunt Channel Technology on the cold plate and directs the coolant to the hottest area within the block to quickly cool the processor. The shunt inside the micro fin structure optimizes the “Boundary Layer” effect which eliminates hot spots for better heat dissipation.

The cube-shaped water block includes the pump and measures approximately 70mm x 70 mm x 55mm.

Pump

Enermax EF1 Pump Design
Image Credit: Enermax

The pump is an EF1 pump dual-chamber design that utilizes ceramic bearings. It sports a motor speed of 3,000 RPM and has an MTBF of 100,000 hours. Per Enermax, the pump is capable of a flow rate of up to 450 liters per hour.

Radiator

The radiator is designed to hold three 120mm fans and measures 394mm x 120mm x 28mm. By our count, the aluminum radiator sports a density of 22 fins per inch.

Enermax LIQTECH II 360mm AIO Cooler Radiator with copper heatplate shown

Fans

Image of a fan included with the Enermax LIQTECH II 360mm AIO Cooler

The included T.B. Pressure PWM fans are standard-sized 120mm fans that have an MTBF of 160,000 hours. The Twister Bearings support a fan speed of 500 to 2,300 RPM at a noise level of 14 to 28 dB(A). The stated airflow is about 24 to 102 CFM. The fans also have rubber pads on the corners to reduce vibration.

RGB

Enermax LIQTECH II 360mm AIO Cooler

There is an addressable RGB water block. The RGB connectivity is provided through a 3 pin ARGB (5V/Data/Ground) connector and is compatible with ASUS, AsRock, MSI and Razer Chroma out of the box and with GIGABYTE boards with the included adapter. The RGB is limited to the Enermax word and a ring around the water block.

Enermax included a basic controller in the box for folks that do not have RGB capabilities built into their system. Lighting modes available via the included controller are as follows: Racing-Rainbow (Default), Breathing-Rainbow, Flash-Rainbow, Overlaying-Rainbow, Flow-Rainbow, Colors auto-run (8 colors), Ripple auto-run (8 colors), Overlaying-RED, Overlaying-GREEN, Overlaying-BLUE.

David Schroth

David is a computer hardware enthusiast that has been tinkering with computer hardware for the past 25 years.

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5 Comments

  1. Very nice article.. Just a one minor criticism though:

    In the testing setup portion of the article, you mention the Corsair H115i Platinum, but don’t dive into any of the specifics of the model. I had to go look up what the cooler was, its dimensions, and its cost. Even when comparing a wide range of coolers in a round-up you’d have listings of specifications for each cooler.

    Looks like the 280mm cooler took the 360mm cooler to school. Maybe a 360mm vs 360mm comparison down the road now that you have 1 360mm in the database? :)

    Again, thank you for a very nice article and I look forward to more content down the road!

  2. Wow, the Corsair definitely schooled it with less of a radiator. Was surprised by those results.
  3. Very nice article.. Just a one minor criticism though:

    In the testing setup portion of the article, you mention the Corsair H115i Platinum, but don’t dive into any of the specifics of the model. I had to go look up what the cooler was, its dimensions, and its cost. Even when comparing a wide range of coolers in a round-up you’d have listings of specifications for each cooler.

    Looks like the 280mm cooler took the 360mm cooler to school. Maybe a 360mm vs 360mm comparison down the road now that you have 1 360mm in the database? :)

    Again, thank you for a very nice article and I look forward to more content down the road!

    Well, once I review the Corsair H115i Platinum, we’ll have all the specs listed for it, and that review can reference back to the Enermax LIQTECH :).

    Next up, I have a Silverstone 360mm, and it will be directly compared to these other two. As we gather data about each one, it’ll be included 1. where relevant in the reviews (though, we may not get into 50 item absurd chart range) and 2. In a way that you can explore data / compare models dynamically (which will have the 50 item absurd chart data behind it).

    You’ll see on the conclusion page that I’m also testing out a dynamic graphing plugin (still working to get our logo on it) – that will become an output target for the datasets for the #2 item assuming everything works magically as I think that it should.

    Wow, the Corsair definitely schooled it with less of a radiator. Was surprised by those results.

    I was surprised as well.

  4. Well, each individual review probably shouldn’t include 50+ samples to compare to, however, there was one site that did heatsink reviews and it would should ~10 coolers to compare them too (usually the newest ones, best one, etc… it compared to) however, it did have a chart that showed 50+ coolers all compared to each other. That was cool as heck to use and I used to use it all the time, but I can’t seem to find it anymore.

    edit
    I thought it was https://www.frostytech.com/ but they seem to be redoing the site and nothing is available anymore.

  5. Thanks David for all the hard work in getting these up and running. Really looking forward to your next round. Liquid cooling is something I’m always considering and taking note of both pump & noise is of major concern to me. The fact that AMD is not even bundling a cooler for their high end CPUs now paints a picture of whats needed the big monsters out there in either field.
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