Image: Denon

If you’re thinking of spending big bucks on a shiny, new HDMI 2.1-compatible receiver, forget about it. Following a report from German publication Heise, at least two manufacturers have confirmed that newer receivers are crippled by a major Panasonic chipset bug that prevents proper pass-through of high bit-rate content (e.g., 4K/120 Hz, 8K/60 Hz) with certain devices.

Some of the victims reportedly include NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 30 Series graphics cards, as well as Microsoft’s new flagship console, the Xbox Series X. Strangely, the bug doesn’t seem to affect the PlayStation 5.

We’re not sure what NVIDIA and Microsoft’s devices are doing differently, but some believe that it has something to do with the way they’re utilizing HDMI’s Fixed Rate Link (FRL) protocol to output an image.

Audioholics has shared two statements that they’ve received from Sound United Response (owners of the Denon and Marantz brands) and Yamaha, which we’ve copied below.

Official Sound United Response Regarding the HDMI 2.1 Chipset Bug:

Some new gaming source devices that support 4K/120Hz output may not work fully with Denon (or Marantz) 8K AVRs. You may discover this incompatibility issue due to a HDMI chipset mismatch between the devices. When the affected system is connected to the AVR via 8K HDMI input and set to output at 4K/120Hz, and the AVR’s 4K Signal Format option is set to “8K Enhanced,” you may not see the system’s source video on their display, and may not hear the system’s source audio processed through the AVR. This problem is only present when a display that supports 4K/120Hz is used.

We are currently investigating the issue further and will offer a permanent solution at a later date. Meanwhile, we would like to provide a couple workarounds to prevent the issue in its current state:

You can connect the system to the display directly via HDMI and use the display’s ARC/eARC functionality to feed the native audio back to the AVR using the connected HDMI cable between the AVR and display. This will allow users to decode the native audio format sent from the source. With this method, the display’s CEC/ARC option must be enabled as well as the AVR’s HDMI Control and/or the AVR’s ARC option. In the AVR, this option is located within the GUI under “Video – HDMI Setup.”

Another workaround is to leave or change the source’s video output to 4K/60Hz instead of 4K/120Hz until a permanent solution is available. This will ensure reliable communication between the source, the AVR and the display. The source’s default is set to output at 4K/60Hz, so if no change was initiated out of the box, then nothing further needs to be done.

We apologize for this inconvenience and we are currently working tirelessly to release a permanent solution so you can enjoy the 4K/120Hz experience using the latest sources with your AVR. We will have an update soon regarding the timeline of a permanent solution. We appreciate your patience.

Official Yamaha Response Regarding the HDMI 2.1 Chipset Bug:

As we test and explore new gaming system capabilities and the latest HDMI specifications, we will provide guidance on our website to help new and future customers with the compatibility of our latest AV receivers. We will certainly provide you with an update in the near-term.

We’re hearing that this chipset bug is impossible to fix with a simple software update, so those of you who are unlucky enough to have already bought an HDMI 2.1 receiver should be prepared to box them back up for shipping. A board replacement will likely be required.

Don’t Miss Out on More FPS Review Content!

Our weekly newsletter includes a recap of our reviews and a run down of the most popular tech news that we published.

Join the Conversation

46 Comments

  1. “HDMI 2.1 Receivers Can’t Pass 4K/120 Hz Content from NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 Series GPUs and Xbox Series X Due to Major Chipset Feature”

    Fixed that for you 🙂

  2. So Microsoft and NVIDIA are the only ones doing it right, since FRL supersedes TMDS in the new specification.

  3. This on top of LG not having universal codec support for their eARC implementation…

    Home theater tech truly sucks.

  4. HT stuff has been hit and miss, and somewhat all over the map for decades. From DVD players that may or may not decode various audio streams, or have the ability to read different disc layers, to HDR’s ongoing evolution, or HDMI cables that might not actually perform as rated, there’s been stuff for awhile now. From different color depths to native vs. upscaled refresh rates, and now multiple VRR implementation types, there’s a whole new swath of stuff to conisder with display tech as well. For those needing the most basic things it’s usually not so much an issue but for the rest of us trying to use the high end features it can really be a headache in wrangling it all down to get working. I admit, though, this ongoing HDMI 2.1 stuff is a bit ridiculous. Hopefully it’ll all get sorted out soon. It does make me glad I don’t need to replace my Onkyo receivers yet but even then, one of them had to get a firmware update just to support DTS:X and Dolby Atmos a month or so after I got it.

  5. Wasn’t aware there were any HDMI 2.1 AVRs yet.

    My Yamaha is HDMI 2.0 I think, 4K certified but at what refresh who knows. About 3 years old. I had already figured I was going to have to bypass my AVR and go straight to TV from PS5, then run ARC back to the receiver I guess. The PS5 doesn’t have an optical jack so I don’t know how else to get audio back to the receiver.

    Unless the 4K passthrough of the AVR wouldn’t affect VRR and other things of the HDMI 2.1 nature. Hard to predict such things when they don’t exist in the wild yet.

    Eh but what do I know. I’m not an HDMI engineer.

    edit – just looked it up and my Yamaha RX-A660 does 4k/60 passthrough and no e-arc. Boooo

  6. Whoops.

    Not sure I’d want to play anything that way either way, as most receivers introduce a bunch of input lag.

    I’d probably wire the GPU straight to the monitor, and do audio over a separate HDMI cable.

    You’d lose the receiver overlays, but that is a small price to pay.

  7. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 21998, member: 203″]
    Not sure I’d want to play anything that way either way, as most receivers introduce a bunch of input lag.

    I’d probably wire the GPU straight to the monitor, and do audio over a separate HDMI cable.
    [/QUOTE]

    You mean via ARC? Not like the PS5 has dual HDMI outputs. I haven’t messed with ARC too much lately, last time I did was a friend’s setup and it had wicked lipsync problems. Probably firmware or a setting somewhere, but I didn’t have forever to work on his problem. He gave up on the AVR and went Sonus soundbar.

    I’ve never noticed lag when gaming with my PS4 going through my Yamaha AVR @ 1080p. But then again I am not a competitive gamer.

  8. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 22005, member: 297″]
    You mean via ARC? Not like the PS5 has dual HDMI outputs. I haven’t messed with ARC too much lately, last time I did was a friend’s setup and it had wicked lipsync problems. Probably firmware or a setting somewhere, but I didn’t have forever to work on his problem. He gave up on the AVR and went Sonus soundbar.

    I’ve never noticed lag when gaming with my PS4 going through my Yamaha AVR @ 1080p. But then again I am not a competitive gamer.
    [/QUOTE]

    Ah, I wasn’t thinking consoles when I read any of that.

    I don’t recall ever feeling lag on any console ever. I think controllers since they are so mcuh less sensitive shield you from the sensation of lag somewhat.

  9. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 22005, member: 297″]
    I’ve never noticed lag when gaming with my PS4 going through my Yamaha AVR @ 1080p. But then again I am not a competitive gamer.
    [/QUOTE]
    Have an older Yamaha myself, and I can get the viewport going one way while I’m slinging the mouse the other 🙂

    TVs are already pretty hit or miss with input lag. The ability to clean up sources is certainly still in demand, so manufacturers have more to balance than on monitors, and understandably need to be careful about where they put the ‘turn off all the processing’ settings.

    You almost want to have entirely separate paths for interactive (games) and non-interactive content, if you could only pull that off without sacrificing convenience. eARC is [I]supposed[/I] to be that solution.

  10. I have an older Yamaha, it has HDMI. I think it was among the first generation to have HDMI – as it also sports a bunch of S-Video, composite, and RCA inputs on the back.

    I haven’t actually used the HDMI inputs on it … ever, I don’t think. I do have an HDMI output run to the TV, just so I can use the setup menu on the receiver (it’s an Atari 2600 level GUI), but once I run the auto-setup to calibrate speakers based on wherever my wife has decided to move the chairs that month, I don’t really need it again. I really only use it as an amplifier, but that does mean all the HDMI inputs on my TV are taken up, and I’m running TOSLINK from the TV back to the receiver.

    Less than optimal, but it’s worked all these years so far, the amplifier still sounds great, and figure it will keep on working until I finally decide to upgrade to Atmos or something beyond 5.1.

    I admit I was looking at one of these HDMI 2.1 receivers not too long ago, as I just recently re-ran rear speaker wire and was looking at adding Atmos at the same time – but very glad I held off on that.

  11. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 21998, member: 203″]
    Whoops.

    Not sure I’d want to play anything that way either way, as most receivers introduce a bunch of input lag.

    I’d probably wire the GPU straight to the monitor, and do audio over a separate HDMI cable.

    You’d lose the receiver overlays, but that is a small price to pay.
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s another reason I like Strix cards. Usually have at least 2 DP and 2 HDMI 🙂

  12. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 22024, member: 96″]
    I have an older Yamaha, it has HDMI. I think it was among the first generation to have HDMI – as it also sports a bunch of S-Video, composite, and RCA inputs on the back.

    I haven’t actually used the HDMI inputs on it … ever, I don’t think. I do have an HDMI output run to the TV, just so I can use the setup menu on the receiver (it’s an Atari 2600 level GUI), but once I run the auto-setup to calibrate speakers based on wherever my wife has decided to move the chairs that month, I don’t really need it again. I really only use it as an amplifier, but that does mean all the HDMI inputs on my TV are taken up, and I’m running TOSLINK from the TV back to the receiver.

    Less than optimal, but it’s worked all these years so far, the amplifier still sounds great, and figure it will keep on working until I finally decide to upgrade to Atmos or something beyond 5.1.

    I admit I was looking at one of these HDMI 2.1 receivers not too long ago, as I just recently re-ran rear speaker wire and was looking at adding Atmos at the same time – but very glad I held off on that.
    [/QUOTE]
    Thats a lot like what I had but the amplifier died at some point, so i have nothing right now. However always thought I would go all HDMI next round… I don’t know. The whole home theater stuff is a mess, unless I suppose if you sink a lot of money.

  13. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 22024, member: 96″]
    I have an older Yamaha, it has HDMI. I think it was among the first generation to have HDMI – as it also sports a bunch of S-Video, composite, and RCA inputs on the back.

    I haven’t actually used the HDMI inputs on it … ever, I don’t think. I do have an HDMI output run to the TV, just so I can use the setup menu on the receiver (it’s an Atari 2600 level GUI), but once I run the auto-setup to calibrate speakers based on wherever my wife has decided to move the chairs that month, I don’t really need it again. I really only use it as an amplifier, but that does mean all the HDMI inputs on my TV are taken up, and I’m running TOSLINK from the TV back to the receiver.

    Less than optimal, but it’s worked all these years so far, the amplifier still sounds great, and figure it will keep on working until I finally decide to upgrade to Atmos or something beyond 5.1.

    I admit I was looking at one of these HDMI 2.1 receivers not too long ago, as I just recently re-ran rear speaker wire and was looking at adding Atmos at the same time – but very glad I held off on that.
    [/QUOTE]

    Optical connections are great, but they can run out of bandwidth for anything above 2 channel audio.

  14. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 22051, member: 203″]
    Optical connections are great, but they can run out of bandwidth for anything above 2 channel audio.
    [/QUOTE]
    I was surprised a while back when one of my motherboards(don’t remember which) actually let me do 5.1 24/96 to a receiver. It was so awesome because, at the time, the graphics card I had only had 1 HDMI. It was a long time ago. Most of the time, though, I’ve been limited to 2.0 24/96. Glad those days are over but they were fun for awhile.

  15. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 22055, member: 87″]
    I was surprised a while back when one of my motherboards(don’t remember which) actually let me do 5.1 24/96 to a receiver. It was so awesome because, at the time, the graphics card I had only had 1 HDMI. It was a long time ago. Most of the time, though, I’ve been limited to 2.0 24/96. Glad those days are over but they were fun for awhile.
    [/QUOTE]

    My understanding is that if the audio is AC3 or DTS encoded you can usually squeeze in more, and maybe the sound chipset on that motherboard was encoding it? I don’t know if such a thing exists. I’d imagine it might introduce processing lag though.

  16. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 22055, member: 87″]
    I was surprised a while back when one of my motherboards(don’t remember which) actually let me do 5.1 24/96 to a receiver. It was so awesome because, at the time, the graphics card I had only had 1 HDMI. It was a long time ago. Most of the time, though, I’ve been limited to 2.0 24/96. Glad those days are over but they were fun for awhile.
    [/QUOTE]
    Bitstream encoding allows 5.1 audio over TOSLINK. I was doing it for more than a decade.

  17. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 22087, member: 203″]
    My understanding is that if the audio is AC3 or DTS encoded you can usually squeeze in more, and maybe the sound chipset on that motherboard was encoding it? I don’t know if such a thing exists. I’d imagine it might introduce processing lag though.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep I saw that and was able to allow pass through but I was also surprised when Windows let me select 5.1 in sound settings. A lot of the time it only gave a stereo option for other rigs.

  18. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 22024, member: 96″]
    I have an older Yamaha, it has HDMI. I think it was among the first generation to have HDMI – as it also sports a bunch of S-Video, composite, and RCA inputs on the back.

    I haven’t actually used the HDMI inputs on it … ever, I don’t think. I do have an HDMI output run to the TV, just so I can use the setup menu on the receiver (it’s an Atari 2600 level GUI), but once I run the auto-setup to calibrate speakers based on wherever my wife has decided to move the chairs that month, I don’t really need it again. I really only use it as an amplifier, but that does mean all the HDMI inputs on my TV are taken up, and I’m running TOSLINK from the TV back to the receiver.

    Less than optimal, but it’s worked all these years so far, the amplifier still sounds great, and figure it will keep on working until I finally decide to upgrade to Atmos or something beyond 5.1.

    I admit I was looking at one of these HDMI 2.1 receivers not too long ago, as I just recently re-ran rear speaker wire and was looking at adding Atmos at the same time – but very glad I held off on that.
    [/QUOTE]

    Someone is going to be in for a fun time with the new consoles, neither of which have toslink anymore. Everything going HDMI has been a benefit and a curse. It makes wiring so much easier, but you are left with limitations.

    I have a 1999 era Yamaha in my office. Toslink is as good as that one gets. Otherwise it’s just as good sounding an amp as the 2016 model in my living room.

    My living room AVR doesn’t do EARC, that is supposed to be a HDMI 2.1 thing. It will support ARC I just have never tried it. I guess I will be doing that if I get a new TV and PS5 for Xmas.

  19. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 22087, member: 203″]
    My understanding is that if the audio is AC3 or DTS encoded you can usually squeeze in more, and maybe the sound chipset on that motherboard was encoding it? I don’t know if such a thing exists. I’d imagine it might introduce processing lag though.
    [/QUOTE]
    It’s all software, and since it has to be decoded by the receiver, there can be processing lag there too, on top of those codecs all being lossy (and ancient).

    I’ll say that it’s not a [I]bad[/I] way to do things if the latency doesn’t impact what you’re doing, it’s just almost completely obsoleted with HDMI.

  20. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 22134, member: 1367″]
    It’s all software, and since it has to be decoded by the receiver, there can be processing lag there too, on top of those codecs all being lossy (and ancient).

    I’ll say that it’s not a [I]bad[/I] way to do things if the latency doesn’t impact what you’re doing, it’s just almost completely obsoleted with HDMI.
    [/QUOTE]
    Unless the HDMI issues screw everything up or make things more complicated. Sort of like what is happening regarding the article subject and this is far from the first time we’ve seen HDMI issues.

    I definitely wouldn’t mind a new optical standard. At worst I have to attach and extra cord but have few or no issues at all. That sounds a lot better than trying to mess with so many HDMI incompatibilities, bugs and workarounds. Plugging in a simple audio cable and have everything work seems to be a much more elegant solution.

  21. [QUOTE=”SmokeRngs, post: 22169, member: 117″]
    I definitely wouldn’t mind a new optical standard. At worst I have to attach and extra cord but have few or no issues at all. That sounds a lot better than trying to mess with so many HDMI incompatibilities, bugs and workarounds. Plugging in a simple audio cable and have everything work seems to be a much more elegant solution.
    [/QUOTE]
    I just want HDMI to universally support audio only transport 🙂

  22. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 22116, member: 297″]
    Someone is going to be in for a fun time with the new consoles, neither of which have toslink anymore. Everything going HDMI has been a benefit and a curse. It makes wiring so much easier, but you are left with limitations.

    I have a 1999 era Yamaha in my office. Toslink is as good as that one gets. Otherwise it’s just as good sounding an amp as the 2016 model in my living room.

    My living room AVR doesn’t do EARC, that is supposed to be a HDMI 2.1 thing. It will support ARC I just have never tried it. I guess I will be doing that if I get a new TV and PS5 for Xmas.
    [/QUOTE]
    I still use my ancient Logitech Z-5500 speakers, which I used TOSLINK to connect my console audio. I am a little peeved that the PS5 got rid of it, as those speakers are still outstanding.

  23. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 22187, member: 1367″]
    I just want HDMI to universally support audio only transport 🙂
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, that’d be nice. Worst thing I’ve encountered with using 2 HDMI ports is some games will randomly just switch over for no known reason. Pisses me off to no end as usually happened in the middle of a fight or battle. Sometimes after a restart it’ll happen also but that’s what I was saying in towards the beginning of this thread. HT issues have been around long before HDMI 2.1.

  24. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 22089, member: 180″]
    Bitstream encoding allows 5.1 audio over TOSLINK. I was doing it for more than a decade.
    [/QUOTE]
    I went crazy to get an NForce mobo with Soundstorm because other surround solutions were pants.
    And it was as good as I hoped, I could finally hook my PC to my surround AVR for gaming, bliss.

  25. [QUOTE=”AntiQuark, post: 22266, member: 83″]
    I went crazy to get an NForce mobo with Soundstorm because other surround solutions were pants.
    And it was as good as I hoped, I could finally hook my PC to my surround AVR for gaming, bliss.
    [/QUOTE]

    Pants?

  26. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 22270, member: 203″]
    Pants?
    [/QUOTE]
    Short for “pants-on-head retarded.” I can’t remember the last time I heard that phrase used. I think I was still in high school :ROFLMAO:.

  27. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 22272, member: 180″]
    Short for “pants-on-head retarded.” I can’t remember the last time I heard that phrase used. I think I was still in high school :ROFLMAO:.
    [/QUOTE]

    Well, that’s a first one for me. Never heard it before. Maybe a regional thing? Or possibly some cultural reference I missed out on.

  28. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 22201, member: 180″]
    I still use my ancient Logitech Z-5500 speakers, which I used TOSLINK to connect my console audio. I am a little peeved that the PS5 got rid of it, as those speakers are still outstanding.
    [/QUOTE]

    Well they do make the little HDMI breakout converters that strip out audio and have rca/toslink output. But who knows how 4k or lag friendly they are.

    Like so, this one isn’t too expensive but some of them are. It says 4k/60 anyway. Never used one personally but I might have to soon.

    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.amazon.com/avedio-links-Extractor-Splitter-Converter/dp/B07H94D77V[/URL]

  29. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 22311, member: 297″]
    Well they do make the little HDMI breakout converters that strip out audio and have rca/toslink output. But who knows how 4k or lag friendly they are.

    Like so, this one isn’t too expensive but some of them are. It says 4k/60 anyway. Never used one personally but I might have to soon.

    [URL unfurl=”true”][URL]https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07H94D77V/?tag=thefpsreview-20[/URL][/URL]
    [/QUOTE]
    Thanks, I’ll take a look. I’ve thought about just doing TOSLINK from my TV to the control pod to get audio, but I have to check if my C8 supports bitstream audio for surround sound over optical. I also need to find a cable long enough to do it.

  30. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 22272, member: 180″]
    Short for “pants-on-head retarded.” I can’t remember the last time I heard that phrase used. I think I was still in high school :ROFLMAO:.
    [/QUOTE]
    Haha, I didnt know the origin, but yes it started at school and having lived all over the country (England) I found it commonly references something not so good/pretty poor.

  31. [QUOTE=”AntiQuark, post: 22498, member: 83″]
    Haha, I didnt know the origin, but yes it started at school and having lived all over the country (England) I found it commonly references something not so good/pretty poor.
    [/QUOTE]
    And [I]then[/I], you have to take it with British sarcasm, so that it means the exact opposite!

  32. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 22379, member: 180″]
    I also need to find a cable long enough to do it.
    [/QUOTE]
    How long you need?
    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.amazon.com/s?k=12%27+toslink&ref=nb_sb_noss_2&tag=thefpsreview-20[/URL]
    12-15 foot under $10

    This one looks fancy with it’s gold plating and it’s $8.50 for 15 ft. I don’t “need” another toslink, but I think I might just have to buy one of those. For “reasons”.
    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DI89YAI/?tag=thefpsreview-20[/URL]

    Jeez I remember spending like $30+ on a 6 foot monster toslink back in the 90’s. I still use it on my PS4, and it’s not nearly as fancy as that last one

  33. I just checked out the ports on the TV I most likely to buy, the Sony X900H and it has a toslink output. So if I do need to do a direct from device to TV, bypassing the AVR, and can still loop back to it without using ARC if I have to. I like having options.

  34. Looks like this got fixed for everything except the Xbox

    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.audioholics.com/news/sound-united-hdmi-2.1-no-issue[/URL]

  35. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 25227, member: 96″]
    Looks like this got fixed for everything except the Xbox

    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://www.audioholics.com/news/sound-united-hdmi-2.1-no-issue[/URL]
    [/QUOTE]
    Awesome news! In other but similar, but not good, I found out last weekend when testing a new HDMI 2.1 cable on my LG C9 that not all the ports are giving full bandwidth. Pretty sure these models are all supposed to. Basically I was getting digital noise(images ghosting across the screen) in anything above 1440p. Tried every cable I’ve got and had the same issue. Switched ports and all was good and back to 4K/120 Hz/G-Sync/12-bit goodness. Heck, I was even able to do all that in 4096×2160 as well. Just a heads up for those who have HDMI 2.1 issues between their PC(3080/3090 GPU) and an LG that it might be the port not the cable. I’ve even got the latest 5.0.0.3 firmware. Plugged my older Sony 4K-Dolby Vision player in that port and it’s happy so no real loss there.

  36. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 25229, member: 87″]
    Awesome news! In other but similar, but not good, I found out last weekend when testing a new HDMI 2.1 cable on my LG C9 that not all the ports are giving full bandwidth. Pretty sure these models are all supposed to. Basically I was getting digital noise(images ghosting across the screen) in anything above 1440p. Tried every cable I’ve got and had the same issue. Switched ports and all was good and back to 4K/120 Hz/G-Sync/12-bit goodness. Heck, I was even able to do all that in 4096×2160 as well. Just a heads up for those who have HDMI 2.1 issues between their PC(3080/3090 GPU) and an LG that it might be the port not the cable. I’ve even got the latest 5.0.0.3 firmware. Plugged my older Sony 4K-Dolby Vision player in that port and it’s happy so no real loss there.
    [/QUOTE]
    Do you have HDMI HD Ultra Deep Color enabled on the port you tried plugging your PC into? I think it also needs to be set to PC mode.

  37. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 25232, member: 180″]
    Do you have HDMI HD Ultra Deep Color enabled on the port you tried plugging your PC into? I think it also needs to be set to PC mode.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep. DItto on both. Game mode enabled as well. I think there’s probably something wrong with the port. There’s 4 ports, 1 for ARC that I’m using with our reciever(sends Atmos no problem BTW). 3 are on the side and one behind. The one behind is the only one I haven’t tried since I have our cable box plugged into it. I might end up using that one for a Shield or PC and swapping the cable box to the receiver. Probably won’t do it until next weekend because I want to have some quality time with CB2077 this weekend instead of troubleshooting.

  38. Just gonna add that used to this with older 2.0 t.v.’s. Seen more than a few that state only specific ports got full bandwidth but AFAIK the C9 isn’t supposed to be like that which also makes me wonder if something’s up with the port.

  39. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 25235, member: 87″]
    Just gonna add that used to this with older 2.0 t.v.’s. Seen more than a few that state only specific ports got full bandwidth but AFAIK the C9 isn’t supposed to be like that which also makes me wonder if something’s up with the port.
    [/QUOTE]
    Looking around we only have LG’s word on all 4 ports having the full bandwidth, but I wouldn’t be surprised if that turned out to not be true. Rtings never updated their review about it even though it looks like they have a 3000-series card on hand now. Don’t know if anybody else with a 9-series OLED has had similar experience.

  40. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 25234, member: 87″]
    Yep. DItto on both. Game mode enabled as well. I think there’s probably something wrong with the port. There’s 4 ports, 1 for ARC that I’m using with our reciever(sends Atmos no problem BTW). 3 are on the side and one behind. The one behind is the only one I haven’t tried since I have our cable box plugged into it. I might end up using that one for a Shield or PC and swapping the cable box to the receiver. Probably won’t do it until next weekend because I want to have some quality time with CB2077 this weekend instead of troubleshooting.
    [/QUOTE]

    Hey Peter…. try a new HDMI cord as well? I was getting a lot of random 4K weirdness on my new TV until I changed the HDMI cord from AVR to the TV with a new high speed one. I really wish they would label those hdmi cords with version #s.

    I thought I was going to have to change a bunch of cables out from devices to the AVR, some of them are ancient. But so far only the one.

    Of course I don’t have anything 4k/120 to test, but it’s passing 4k/60 now and it wouldn’t before.

  41. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 25256, member: 297″]
    Hey Peter…. try a new HDMI cord as well? I was getting a lot of random 4K weirdness on my new TV until I changed the HDMI cord from AVR to the TV with a new high speed one. I really wish they would label those hdmi cords with version #s.

    I thought I was going to have to change a bunch of cables out from devices to the AVR, some of them are ancient. But so far only the one.

    Of course I don’t have anything 4k/120 to test, but it’s passing 4k/60 now and it wouldn’t before.
    [/QUOTE]
    HDMI doesn’t want to label them with version numbers to avoid the confusion that the cable only works with certain devices when technically it will work with all versions. However, that means needing to go to their website to read about the different labeling to know what you’re buying. In this case, Ultra High Speed cables are what is needed.

  42. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 25256, member: 297″]
    Hey Peter…. try a new HDMI cord as well? I was getting a lot of random 4K weirdness on my new TV until I changed the HDMI cord from AVR to the TV with a new high speed one. I really wish they would label those hdmi cords with version #s.

    I thought I was going to have to change a bunch of cables out from devices to the AVR, some of them are ancient. But so far only the one.

    Of course I don’t have anything 4k/120 to test, but it’s passing 4k/60 now and it wouldn’t before.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, I tried 4 different ones ranging from standard 2.0 to some that I got that were rated 48 Gbps to actual one claiming to be HDMI 2.1. Ironically all four worked on the other port. All the more reason I’m believing its the port. Something else I forgot to mention is that the LGs have limited diagnostic and when I ran it, on the question port it said HDMI -NG check/replace cables. Meanwhile, when I switched over to the other one they all tested o.k. To me it sounds like they have some pins/solder points with some issues. It has enough redundancy to compensate for lower bandwidth needs but under full load there’s just not enough uncorrupted signal. That’s my guess.

  43. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 25259, member: 180″]
    HDMI doesn’t want to label them with version numbers to avoid the confusion that the cable only works with certain devices when technically it will work with all versions. However, that means needing to go to their website to read about the different labeling to know what you’re buying. In this case, Ultra High Speed cables are what is needed.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep! I remember when that all came about right after 1.4

  44. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 25286, member: 87″]
    Yeah, I tried 4 different ones ranging from standard 2.0 to some that I got that were rated 48 Gbps to actual one claiming to be HDMI 2.1. Ironically all four worked on the other port. All the more reason I’m believing its the port. Something else I forgot to mention is that the LGs have limited diagnostic and when I ran it, on the question port it said HDMI -NG check/replace cables. Meanwhile, when I switched over to the other one they all tested o.k. To me it sounds like they have some pins/solder points with some issues. It has enough redundancy to compensate for lower bandwidth needs but under full load there’s just not enough uncorrupted signal. That’s my guess.
    [/QUOTE]

    Ya ok sounds like something funky with the port, I agree

  45. I was very close to buying a new Denon AVR so my Dad could have my 4400X, but at the last moment backed out because it only has single HDMI 2.1 input/output.
    So glad I dodged that bullet!

  46. Pioneer and Onkyo are supposed to be releasing their HDMI 2.1 receivers June-August. They should be unaffected by the bug in the Panasonic HDMI chip.

Leave a comment