Image: Sabrent

The world’s fastest NVMe SSD is about to get a size increase. Sabrent has announced that its Rocket 4 Plus lineup will include a 4 TB version on top of its 1 TB and 2 TB versions soon. These SSDs operate at lightning-fast speeds seldom seen on consumer PCIe 4.0 devices. Specs for the 4 TB version have not been released, but we’ve provided details for the 1 TB and 2 TB versions for reference.

Rocket 4 Plus 1 TB and 2 TB Specifications

  • Interface: NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen4 x4 Interface.
  • Compliancy: PCIe 4.0 Compliant / NVMe 1.3 Compliant.
  • Power Management Support: APST / ASPM / L1.2.
  • PCIe 4.0 read/write speeds: 7000 MB/s (read) and 5300 MB/s (write)
  • PCIe 3.0 read/write speeds: 3400 MB/s (read) and 3000 MB/s (write)
  • Flash Interface Support: ONFi 2.3, ONFi 3.0, ONFi 3.2 and ONFi 4.0 interface.
  • Data Protection: SMART and TRIM commands. Advanced Wear Leveling, Bad Block Management, Error Correction Code, and Over-Provision.
  • Software: All Sabrent SSDs come with FREE Sabrent Acronis True Image for Sabrent Software for easy Cloning. For those who require a specific sector size to clone their existing SSDs: A newly released Sabrent utility enables users to re-format the Rocket drive and choose the sector size of their liking, either 512-bytes or 4K bytes.
  • Firmware: Upgradeable

No prices have been announced, but the Rocket 4 Plus line costs more than the non-Plus versions. The 1 TB Rocket 4 Plus retails for $299.99, and the 2 TB Rocket 4 Plus goes for $499.99.

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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

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12 Comments

  1. I might be the minority in this again. But I don’t want faster SSD-s. I want large cheap SSDs to be able to retire spinners as long term storage. I don’t need PCIE4, SATA is fine, it doesn’t even need to max out SATA3, 400MB/s writes is fine.

    This seems to me the same as when CD-ROM drives were hitting 54x and 56x speeds. When a 20x drive was fine for everything.

  2. Yeah, I’m pretty much the same. Speed is nice but I’d rather just have more storage on that interface. ATM most things cannot even really use it to its fullest potential anyway. I do see a significant decrease in load times with my 1 TB non-plus over my SATA III stuff but not enough to make me scream “MOAR”. Here’s hoping to get a 4 TB non-plus by next black Friday for around $200-$250.

    Although if I had the extra cash to burn sure I’d get one but that’s not even close to happening right now. Still paying off my GPU.

  3. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 26670, member: 52″]
    Price this at close to the PCIe 3.0 version and I might be interested (10-12 cents / GB).
    [/QUOTE]
    The 2TB in the article is 25¢ per GB…

  4. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 26717, member: 180″]
    The 2TB in the article is 25¢ per GB…
    [/QUOTE]
    Correct.. but that’s 2TB @ PCIe 4.0 specs. Price it close to the PCIe 3.0 version (which is currently 10-12¢ per GB.)

  5. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 26722, member: 52″]
    Correct.. but that’s 2TB @ PCIe 4.0 specs. Price it close to the PCIe 3.0 version (which is currently 10-12¢ per GB.)
    [/QUOTE]
    But they’re not talking about a PCI-E 3.0 version? We already have what the price per GB is on the smaller ones, so that is what we have to go by.

    I’m confused…

  6. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 26725, member: 180″]
    But they’re not talking about a PCI-E 3.0 version? We already have what the price per GB is on the smaller ones, so that is what we have to go by.

    I’m confused…
    [/QUOTE]
    I’m waiting for PCIe 4.0 performance at PCIe 3.0 pricing. That’s what I want.. I bought my Inland 2TB PCIe 3.0 drive for $190. I’d love to get a PCIe 4.0 drive for the same price eventually..

  7. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 26725, member: 180″]
    But they’re not talking about a PCI-E 3.0 version? We already have what the price per GB is on the smaller ones, so that is what we have to go by.

    I’m confused…
    [/QUOTE]
    I think Space_Ranger is saying that knowing storage only costs $.1/G once you hit commodity levels, that makes for an awfully expensive PCI 4 controller

  8. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 26727, member: 52″]
    I’m waiting for PCIe 4.0 performance at PCIe 3.0 pricing. That’s what I want.. I bought my Inland 2TB PCIe 3.0 drive for $190. I’d love to get a PCIe 4.0 drive for the same price eventually..
    [/QUOTE]
    If the NAND factories can go long enough without a power outtage, earthquake, pandemic, political upheaval, supply shortage, letting the cat sneak out the door, someone tripping on a power cord, etc., it’ll happen. 😉

  9. Do the 4.0s use different NAND than the 3.0s? I thought it was just a different interface controller?

  10. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 26774, member: 96″]
    Do the 4.0s use different NAND than the 3.0s? I thought it was just a different interface controller?
    [/QUOTE]
    To my knowledge, the 1 and 2 TB models use Micron B27B TLC 96-Layer chips, and the 4TB model would have to use QLC in order to reach that size. I could be wrong on the 4TB model, as I’m speculating here. I couldn’t find any documentation anywhere that mentions what chips are used for that.

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