Image: ASUS

ASUS and MSI have shared the prices for their upcoming Z590 motherboards, and they aren’t pretty, particularly for prospective Intel 11th Gen Core “Rocket Lake-S” processor adopters who are planning on purchasing these manufacturers’ flagship options.

You can check out the tables below for the full story, but ASUS’ ROG MAXIMUS XIII EXTREME GLACIAL and ROG MAXIMUS XIII EXTREME cost 1,516 EUR and 960 EUR, respectively, while MSI’s MEG Z590 GODLIKE is similarly expensive at 1,019 EUR. The prices suggest that the boards could easily cost over $1,000 in the U.S.

“For our Z590 lineup, we use all platform features offered by the 11th generation of core processors in order to offer Intel PCs a thoroughly innovative experience for DIY enthusiasts,” ASUS wrote in its press release.

“In conjunction with these upcoming CPUs, ASUS Z590 motherboards offer up to 16 lanes of PCI Express 4.0 connectivity directly from the processor and deliver up to 32GB / s bandwidth for today’s most powerful discrete graphics processors. The Z590 platform also uses four dedicated PCIe 4.0 lanes from the processor for maximum performance with the latest SSDs.”

ASUS Z590 Motherboards Pricing

ModelRRPAvailability
ROG MAXIMUS XIII EXTREME GLACIAL1516 EURQ1 / 2021
ROG MAXIMUS XIII EXTREME960 EURQ1 / 2021
ROG MAXIMUS XIII HERO505 EURBeginning of February 2021
ROG MAXIMUS XIII APEX505 EURQ1 / 2021
ROG STRIX Z590-E GAMING WIFI378 EURBeginning of February 2021
ROG STRIX Z590-F GAMING WIFI341 EURBeginning of February 2021
ROG STRIX Z590-A GAMING WIFI328 EURBeginning of February 2021
ROG STRIX Z590-I GAMING WIFI378 EURQ1 / 2021
PRIME Z590-A277 EURBeginning of February 2021
TUF GAMING Z590-PLUS WIFI252 EURBeginning of February 2021
TUF GAMING Z590-PLUS239 EURQ1 / 2021
PRIME Z590-P201 EURQ1 / 2021
PRIME Z590M-PLUS189 EURQ1 / 2021

MSI Z590 Motherboards Pricing

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16 Comments

  1. Nah I’m good.

    I’m all for a solid mother board, but there are plenty of solid motherboards out there well south of 4 digits. Heck just go back 5 years and pretty much every motherboard available was south of $200.

    This sh!t is getting out of hand

  2. Heck just go back 5 years and pretty much every motherboard available was south of $200.

    This isn’t true. I reviewed the GIGABYTE X58A-UD9, which at the time was $700. Even motherboards like GIGABYTE’s Z170X-Gaming G1 were over $400 back then. MSI’s X99A GODLIKE was $550 when it came out. Hell, go back even further and EVGA’s Black Pearl was $500. We’ve been north of $500 on the ultra-high end of the range for quite some time. Many years in fact. It’s also been several years since the mid-range boards have been north of $200.

    This sh!t is getting out of hand

    On this, we can agree.

  3. It may have subpar VRM implementation but that $400 I spent for my X570 board sure seems like a good deal now.
  4. Is that a built in cpu waterblock on that thing? I was like… where is the cpu, etc then I saw the holes.

    And yeah, eff this. Homey doesn’t spend over $200 on motherboards. And I prefer $100.

  5. This isn’t true. I reviewed the GIGABYTE X58A-UD9, which at the time was $700. Even motherboards like GIGABYTE’s Z170X-Gaming G1 were over $400 back then. MSI’s X99A GODLIKE was $550 when it came out. Hell, go back even further and EVGA’s Black Pearl was $500. We’ve been north of $500 on the ultra-high end of the range for quite some time. Many years in fact. It’s also been several years since the mid-range boards have been north of $200.

    On this, we can agree.

    Thats a glorious board too, the X58A-UD9 and its siblings.

  6. I’ll spend near 300 on a motherboard. But this is getting out of hand. Then again people are spending close to 1400 on white RTX 3080’s so who the eff knows.
  7. Is that a built in cpu waterblock on that thing? I was like… where is the cpu, etc then I saw the holes.

    And yeah, eff this. Homey doesn’t spend over $200 on motherboards. And I prefer $100.

    I haven’t seen a motherboard that I’d want to buy for $100 since the 1990’s. That being said, $400-$500 is one thing, $1,000 is another thing entirely. Supposed pricing on some of them is well past $1,000 and I think that the motherboard companies are going to use the pandemic and supply chain issues to justify a massive price (and therefore margin hike).

    Even with a monoblock, it’s hard to justify these prices.

  8. That’s a high price for a motherboard that will more than likely be phased out quicker than most if Alder lake stays on schedule.
  9. This isn’t true. I reviewed the GIGABYTE X58A-UD9, which at the time was $700.

    Or you could get the UD3R, which had 99% of the features of the UD9, except for 4 way SLI. In a way it was even better since it still had one pci slot for backwards compatibility.

  10. I have never spent over $200 on a motherboard in my lifetime. Plenty of great options are still available in the $200 range.
  11. I have never spent over $200 on a motherboard in my lifetime. Plenty of great options are still available in the $200 range.

    I didn’t either, until X99 since then if you want the latest chipset you had to spend at least $300.

  12. Or you could get the UD3R, which had 99% of the features of the UD9, except for 4 way SLI.

    It’s more like 70% the same. Sure, things like the audio CODEC and storage controllers were the same, but that’s about where the similarities end. The X58A-UD3R was great, but it had a lesser VRM implementation. Fewer power phases and if I remember right, a different voltage controller. Furthermore, it had one less LAN connection, worse MOSFET and chipset cooling, and the slot configuration was less desirable. Even back then I wouldn’t have wanted a standard PCI slot and all PCIe x16 slots beats a mixed slot configuration any day of the week. I think I knocked the UD3R and the UD7 for having a PCI slot back in the day. They were largely unused even then.

    I never thought the X58A-UD9 was worth the high price tag as competing options from GIGABYTE like the X58A-UD7 (though it’s slot layout was exactly like the UD3R’s) and those offered by MSI and ASUS were close enough or in some cases, better. Worse yet, I recall the firmware on the UD9 being quirky as hell. It didn’t like certain keyboards in the BIOS or you had to use a specific USB 1.1/2.0 slot. You had to use USB 1.1/2.0 slots for that back then, but not specific ones. I’d agree the X58A-UD9 wasn’t worth $700, but the UD3R wasn’t 99% as good either. The Rampage III Black Edition, Rampage III Extreme, EVGA X58 Classified were effectively the company the X58A-UD9 kept and those options were still all much cheaper than the UD9. I think the ROG Rampage III Black Edition was the most expensive at $550, which was high but way cheaper than the UD9.

  13. One thing I’ve noticed over the years is that the mid and lower range motherboards often go on sale for great prices at black Friday. They tend to get overshadowed by a lot of other things. I’d have to go back and check but I may have paid closer to $200 for my X570 board and pretty sure the same for probably even less for my X79 UD3 when I got it six or seven years ago.

    Have to admit though, $1K for one, sheesh that’s too much.

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