Image: Warner Bros.

Christopher Nolan has kept a close relationship with Warner Bros. ever since the studio entrusted the acclaimed director to tackle psychological thriller Insomnia back in 2002, but due to recent controversies, their lucrative collaborations are likely coming to an end. This is according to sources with The Wall Street Journal (via The Playlist), which published a report today claiming that the Batman Begins and Memento filmmaker would be looking at a different studio for his next project based on Warner’s decision to embrace the streaming model and release its 2021 blockbusters straight to HBO Max.

“After spending years as a top Warner Bros. director, Christopher Nolan, who wrote and directed last year’s Tenet, is unlikely to return to the studio with his next project, in part because he was disappointed with the studio’s hybrid distribution strategy for 2021, according to people familiar with the matter,” The Wall Street Journal wrote in a piece discussing the effects that streaming and coronavirus have had on Hollywood and the film industry.

It was only last month that Christopher Nolan ripped HBO Max as the “worst streaming service” after Warner Bros. and parent company AT&T announced that they’d be doubling down on streaming and using their upcoming portfolio of blockbusters to entice film aficionados into signing up for HBO Max, which isn’t doing quite as well as Netflix, Disney+, and other major competitors.

“Warner Bros. had an incredible machine for getting a filmmaker’s work out everywhere, both in theaters and in the home, and they are dismantling it as we speak,” Nolan said. “They don’t even understand what they’re losing. Their decision makes no economic sense, and even the most casual Wall Street investor can see the difference between disruption and dysfunction.”

In a separate interview with Entertainment Tonight, Nolan said that he was in disbelief of the decision, calling it a “bait and switch” that has since generated a “very, very, very, very messy” level of controversy.

“Yeah, it’s sort of not how you treat filmmakers and stars and people who, these guys have given a lot for these projects,” the director said. “They deserved to be consulted and spoken to about what was going to happen to their work.”

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15 Comments

  1. I remember when Peter Jackson thought that he was also bigger than brand.

    Now, he has failed to doing only documentaries

  2. Is he expecting theaters to go back to normal soon? Does he live in a world that does [I]not[/I] have COVID-19? Where is this place, cuz I would like to go there too.

  3. This guy….. “oh my movies are art and should only be viewed on 60 foot movie theater screens”…. whatever.

  4. It took Tenet 18 weeks to make $363 million worldwide. It could have at least doubled that had they put it on streaming platforms. In all honesty when I watched the movie again at home after it released on UHD BR I didn’t feel like I really lost any of the experience of the film, though it was fun seeing it in IMAX. Directors like Nolan who say they are resisting streaming for the art form are extremely misguided, narcissistic, or both.

  5. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 28044, member: 180″]
    It took Tenet 18 weeks to make $363 million worldwide. It could have at least doubled that had they put it on streaming platforms. In all honesty when I watched the movie again at home after it released on UHD BR I didn’t feel like I really lost any of the experience of the film, though it was fun seeing it in IMAX. Directors like Nolan who say they are resisting streaming for the art form are extremely misguided, narcissistic, or both.
    [/QUOTE]
    Also there are those who think 24 fps makes movies “art”. F Good stories, meaning, and acting makes it art, not what on and how you watch it.

  6. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 28043, member: 1298″]
    Bye bye.

    I never liked any of his stupid movies anyway even the “good” ones.
    [/QUOTE]

    I couldn’t agree more. Even the Batman Begins trilogy isn’t that great if you ask me. I liked the fist and second ones for the most part though I do have issues with aspects of the film and the casting of Christian Bale. I thought the third installment was the second worst Batman film of all time coming in second to Batman & Robin.

  7. I didn’t have a problem with Bale, but the only new batman movie that didn’t suck was the Dark Knight. No that wasn’t great either by any measure of the word, but at least it was OK. Second one was forgettable, the third bad as you said.

  8. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 28082, member: 1298″]
    I didn’t have a problem with Bale, but the only new batman movie that didn’t suck was the Dark Knight. No that wasn’t great either by any measure of the word, but at least it was OK. Second one was forgettable, the third bad as you said.
    [/QUOTE]

    Dark knight was the 2nd one. The first 2 were decent, Dark Knight Rises (3rd) was bad. “Hey I know, let’s put a mask on our main villian, so no one can understand WTF he is saying through the whole movie!” OTOH maybe he was just ahead of the times (covid).

  9. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 28094, member: 297″]
    Dark knight was the 2nd one. The first 2 were decent, Dark Knight Rises (3rd) was bad. “Hey I know, let’s put a mask on our main villian, so no one can understand WTF he is saying through the whole movie!” OTOH maybe he was just ahead of the times (covid).
    [/QUOTE]
    Well that’s part of the problem, churning out copies and derivatives on an assembly line, of course I can’t even tell them apart, but I meant the first movie was OK.

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