Image: NVIDIA

NVIDIA has confirmed that its next Ampere card, the GeForce RTX 3060, will be launching on February 25. The key word here is “launching,” as nobody seems to be sure how many graphics cards will actually be available to purchase when the midrange SKU is released in two weeks. What we do know is that the GPU has been blessed with a relatively bargain starting price of $329, and that NVIDIA won’t be producing a Founders Edition.

“Enter the GeForce RTX 3060, a $329 upgrade launching late February that brings the power of Ampere, our 2nd Generation RTX architecture, to every gamer,” NVIDIA wrote in its original announcement. “With it, you get twice the raster performance and 10x the ray tracing performance of the GeForce GTX 1060 – a massive increase.”

“The GeForce RTX 3060 has the power to dazzle you with immersive ray-traced effects in Control, Cyberpunk 2077, Fortnite, Minecraft with RTX For Windows 10, Watch Dogs: Legion, and many other titles. And of course, NVIDIA DLSS is included, too, greatly accelerating frame rates in over 40 RTX games.”

NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 3060 is an Ampere-based graphics card equipped with 3,584 CUDA Cores, 12 GB of GDDR5 memory, and a base/boost clock of 1.32/1.78 GHz. First-party benchmarks suggest that the GPU should be a healthy upgrade over its GeForce RTX 2060 predecessor, with the ability to play newer titles such as Cyberpunk 2077 and Watch Dogs: Legion at 60 FPS with ray tracing enabled (1080p, DLSS).

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3 Comments

  1. Well, after you look for it and don’t find it, you can buy an all new but old 1050 or 2060!. Okay okay , the 2060 is still nice, and I still believe the 2000 series was killed (now zombified?) Too early.

  2. [QUOTE=”Uvilla, post: 29514, member: 397″]
    Well, after you look for it and don’t find it, you can buy an all new but old 1050 or 2060!. Okay okay , the 2060 is still nice, and I still believe the 2000 series was killed (now zombified?) Too early.
    [/QUOTE]
    It was unbalanced, more or less.

    Basically Nvidia knew they could do better at that time, but the fabs weren’t ready, so they had to dial back a bit, and RT is where that happened. GPUs still had to be faster than the previous generation at normal stuff to get sales of course.

    It was a good strategy and it worked, largely because AMD was (and is) no threat when it comes to top-end performance and quality implementation of new GPU technologies, but it also wasn’t going to really sell ray-tracing as a solution to the market as a whole, so the generation had a bit more ‘planned obsolescence’ built in that usual, so to speak.

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