Image: Netflix

Netflix may still be the undisputed leader and poster child for streaming services, but its competitors are quickly growing and having an adverse effect on its ability to increase and/or maintain its subscribers. This is made clear by the latest numbers from market-leading data and analytics firm Ampere Analysis, which suggest that Netflix has lost as much as 31 percent of its market share over the last year. While Netflix remains on top with 20 percent market share, rivals such as Amazon Prime Video (16 percent), Hulu (13 percent), and Disney+ (11 percent) are clearly gaining ground.

After a year in which streaming became even more important to millions of Americans, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, Netflix still dominates the streaming universe in the U.S. But new data shared by Ampere Analysis with TheWrap shows that while Netflix holds 20% of the U.S. streaming market, its dominance over the rest of the streaming landscape has shrunk from 29% — a drop of nearly one third — as more services enter the market.

Source: The Wrap

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9 Comments

  1. We’ve went from outrageous cable bills with nothing to watch, to a dozen+ services, all with their own fee, with nothing to watch.
  2. We’ve went from outrageous cable bills with nothing to watch, to a dozen+ services, all with their own fee, with nothing to watch.

    Too true. I’ll say that DIsney+ has managed to incrementally keep things coming which has been nice. Prime’s always been a bit of a waffle experience. Netflix, well, we find something new maybe once or twice a month anymore. Once we binged all the new Star Trek stuff on CBS there hasn’t been much else we don’t already have or watched to death. HBO’s theatrical releases have been nice but that’s about it there. We almost never watch anything on Hulu or Peacock.

  3. Someone needs to look at the numbers again

    While Netflix remains on top with 20 percent market share, rivals such as Amazon Prime Video (16 percent), Hulu (13 percent), and Disney+ (11 percent) are clearly gaining ground.

    All those rivals also lost market share iso gaining

  4. Well, tons of people also cancelled their Netflix subscriptions due to the "Cuties" fiasco. That likely didn’t help as the numbers were significant on that if I recall correctly.
  5. We’ve went from outrageous cable bills with nothing to watch, to a dozen+ services, all with their own fee, with nothing to watch.

    True, but I have managed to drastically cut my bills. I get Netflix as part of cellphone plan, I get Amazon Prime as part of my normal prime, and I pay for the Disney+/Hulu/ESPN+ bundle. So, the only "direct cost" for my tv is $12.99 a month since everything else is a perk or part of normal other bill.

  6. All those rate hikes probably didn’t make them any new friends either. For a while it seemed like every year, or less, they were going up.
  7. As far as I am concerned, market share is not the interesting number.

    They were the first streaming service. At that point they had 100% market share. They could only go down from there as new entrants entered the market.

    What is more interesting is how many subscribers they have. In a growing market you can lose market share at the same time as you are growing.

  8. Lost market share is very misleading way to put it, as there is no real loss involved. It’s more like the market has become larger with more players being involved. Just because hbo max increased their share does not mean netflix has lost any actual subscribers.
  9. Lost market share is very misleading way to put it, as there is no real loss involved. It’s more like the market has become larger with more players being involved. Just because hbo max increased their share does not mean netflix has lost any actual subscribers.

    Too true. I’m not sure if they’ve released data on how many may have canceled vs how many new in the same time period and then compared that to total market share. Definitely more than a few ways to look at it.

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