Image: Noctua

Noctua’s upcoming high-performance fanless CPU cooler, the NH-P1, will be priced at $100. This is according to a product listing that was published earlier today by Newegg, which has since been removed. Featuring six heat pipes and widely spaced heat sink fins, Noctua’s NH-P1 is a completely silent cooling option that is suitable for more modest-performing CPUs. The fanless cooler can be bolstered with some of Noctua’s fans to better complement overclocked processors, however.

Image: Noctua

✓ Fanless heatsink for 100% silent cooling through natural convection (see setup guidelines & list of recommended cases) or semi-passive setups with virtually inaudible NF-A12x25 LS-PWM fan (optional)

✓ 100% RAM compatibility on AMD AM4 and Intel LGA1200/115x, clears the top PCIe slot on most ATX and µATX motherboards

✓ Professional, Torx-based SecuFirm2+ mounting system for Intel LGA115x (LGA1150, LGA1151, LGA1155, LGA1156), LGA1200, LGA20xx (LGA2066, LGA2011-0, LGA2011-3) & AMD AM4, AM3(+), AM2(+), FM2(+), FM1

✓ Further improved second-generation NT-H2 thermal compound for optimal overall cooling performance

✓ Recommended for CPUs with low to moderate heat dissipation (see CPU compatibility list), e.g. Intel 9900K, 9700K or AMD Ryzen 2700X, 3950X 3700X, 3400G, etc.

Source: FanlessTech

Don’t Miss Out on More FPS Review Content!

Our weekly newsletter includes a recap of our reviews and a run down of the most popular tech news that we published.

Join the Conversation

6 Comments

  1. How much for the Borg cube with a fan? If it’s that decent without one, imagine it with a bit of air on it…..

  2. [QUOTE=”Dogsofjune, post: 35610, member: 168″]
    How much for the Borg cube with a fan? If it’s that decent without one, imagine it with a bit of air on it…..
    [/QUOTE]
    Fin spacing has to change if you’re going fully passive, so it may, or may not, be better than a D15. Perhaps a review site somewhere could slap a big, fast fan on it and see how it does?

  3. [QUOTE] ✓ Recommended for CPUs with low to moderate heat dissipation (see CPU compatibility list), e.g. Intel 9900K, 9700K or AMD Ryzen 2700X, 3950X 3700X, 3400G, etc. [/QUOTE]

    Low to moderate heat dissipation…

    9900K…

    One of these things is not like the other 😀

    [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 35615, member: 1041″]
    Fin spacing has to change if you’re going fully passive, so it may, or may not, be better than a D15. Perhaps a review site somewhere could slap a big, fast fan on it and see how it does?
    [/QUOTE]
    They list an optional 120mm fan, but it’s not likely capable of handling sustained ~200w loads, and you’re going to want your enclosure tuned to take advantage of any convective attributes inherent to their design.

    I’d rather see AMD market some strong eight-core APUs, or perhaps whatever Intel has coming in the space with better IGPs, to put under one of these for real-world use.

  4. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 35628, member: 1367″]
    Low to moderate heat dissipation…

    9900K…

    One of these things is not like the other 😀
    [/QUOTE]

    Well, the 9900k ~used~ to be considered a power hog. Then came Comet Lake saying “hold my beer”. And then came Rocket Lake saying “y’all ain’t seen nothin'”

    I guess that’s what happens when you are stuck on 14nm – you just keep tweaking the turbo to cheat around an official TDP listing of 65W… until you find the chip is sitting at over 250W during some stock clock “boosted” situations.

  5. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 35660, member: 96″]
    Well, the 9900k ~used~ to be considered a power hog. Then came Comet Lake saying “hold my beer”. And then came Rocket Lake saying “y’all ain’t seen nothin'”

    I guess that’s what happens when you are stuck on 14nm – you just keep tweaking the turbo to cheat around an official TDP listing of 65W… until you find the chip is sitting at over 250W during some stock clock “boosted” situations.
    [/QUOTE]
    I can still get my 9900K over 200W; granted there’s not much to be gained, but it can pull it if asked.

Leave a comment