Image: Intel

TUM_APISAK has shared some figures that demonstrate how two of Intel’s upcoming Xe-HPG DG2 gaming GPUs might fare against the competition. According to the leaker, Intel’s second-best DG2 GPU—a newly discovered SKU featuring 448 Execution Units and a boost clock of 1.8 GHz—will come quite close to NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 3070 graphics cards in terms of performance. This particular GPU is also said to be 8 percent slower than AMD’s Radeon RX 6700 XT. Another of Intel’s DG2 GPUs, which only features 128 Execution Units but a boost clock of 1.9 GHz, is estimated to be 12 percent faster than NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 1650.

Intel Xe-HPG DG2 GPUs

SKU 1SKU 2SKU 3SKU 4SKU 5
Package typeBGA2660BGA2660BGA2660TBCTBC
Supported Memory TechnologyGDDR6GDDR6GDDR6GDDR6GDDR6
Memory speed16 Gbps16 Gbps16 Gbps16 Gbps16 Gbps
Interface / bus256-bit192-bit128-bit64-bit64-bit
Memory Size (Max)16 GB12 GB8 GB4 GB4 GB
Smart cache size16 MB16 MB8 MBTBCTBC
Graphics Execution Units (EUs) 512384256196128
Graphics Frequency (High) Mobile 1.1 GHz600 MHz450 MHzTBCTBC
Graphics Frequency (Turbo) Mobile1.8 GHz1.8 GHz1.4 GHzTBCTBC
TDP Mobile (Chip Only)100100100TBCTBC
TDP desktopTBCTBCTBCTBCTBC
Source: Igor’s Lab

Intel Xe-HPG DG2 GPU Based Discrete Gaming Graphics Cards

GPU VariantGPU SKUExecution UnitsShading Units (Cores)Memory CapacityMemory BusTGP
Xe-HPG 512EUDG2-512EU512 EUs409616/8 GB GDDR6256-bit~275W
Xe-HPG 384EUDG2-384EU384 EUs307212/6 GB GDDR6192-bitTBC
Xe-HPG 256EUDG2-384EU256 EUs20488/4 GB GDDR6128-bitTBC
Xe-HPG 192EUDG2-384EU192 EUs15364 GB GDDR6128-bitTBC
Xe-HPG 128EUDG2-128EU128 EUs10244 GB GDDR664-bitTBC
Xe-HPG 96EUDG2-128EU86 EUs7684 GB GDDR664-bit~120W
Source: Wccftech

[…] the Intel Xe-HPG DG2-448 EU SKU tested was operating at a clock speed of around 1.8 GHz while the 128 EU SKU was operating at a clock speed of around 1.9 GHz. We don’t know if that’s the average, max, or base clock speed but given what we have seen on the Xe architecture, it should be the maximum clock speed.

Sources: TUM_APISAK, Wccftech, Igor’s Lab

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12 Comments

  1. If it ever comes to light. It’s like Blizzard products, hype years before anyone can buy it

  2. [QUOTE=”Dogsofjune, post: 36339, member: 168″]
    If it ever comes to light. It’s like Blizzard products, hype years before anyone can buy it
    [/QUOTE]
    I thought pc hardware was like fine wine… An Intel gpu 5 years in the making, way better than a new Nvidia. Nvidia’s is all green and sour you see…

  3. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 36319, member: 215″]
    Again only time will tell. Once there is product in people’s hands.
    [/QUOTE]
    you mean scalper hands 😀 😉

  4. I welcome the competition. But we’ll see…. and will they do something to limit mining so we can actually purchase one?

    Only the Shadow knows…

  5. [QUOTE=”Uvilla, post: 36359, member: 397″]
    I thought pc hardware was like fine wine… An Intel gpu 5 years in the making, way better than a new Nvidia. Nvidia’s is all green and sour you see…
    [/QUOTE]

    How many years do you think Ampere has been in developent?

    Way better is yet to be seen. Kudos to intel for coming back to graphics cards but they have yet to prove to be worthy.

  6. We’re comparing to Nvidia here… but the real comparison is with AMD.

    And where AMD needs to worry is that while they’ve been competing with Nvidia in terms of hardware off and on, they’ve mostly been losing when it comes to software support.

    And Intel is the king of software support. They have drivers in Linux kernels before their hardware is released, for example, and Intel’s video transcoders are the best supported around.

    Now they’re going to put some grunt behind their already well-supported GPU hardware. I’m expecting a rocky start with plenty of issues to go around, but once developers are tuned in to ‘Xe’, which is competing for wafer capacity at TSMC alongside AMD, well, AMD has reason to worry, and perhaps redouble their efforts.

    Since I don’t want to end on a negative note: I do sincerely hope that AMD is able to redouble their efforts in the GPU space. Things do look a bit bleak, but we’re also in position for AMD to pull off another Radeon 9700 Pro too!

  7. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 36604, member: 1367″]
    And Intel is the king of software support. They have drivers in Linux kernels before their hardware is released, for example, and Intel’s video transcoders are the best supported around.
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t know if I would go that far. Their driver support cadence is… abysmal. And for a gaming card, those drivers have tweaks/updates with every major game release. Intel drivers are more like every other year. They are almost always very stable and mature, but they don’t get frequent updates.

    Now maybe they can develop an architecture that doesn’t need to have driver updates for every game. I kinda doubt it though. And a couple of years back Intel had committed to better video driver releases, and went so far as to have a special group for it. Seems like Kyle had some hand in that in his short stint over at Intel – but seems that group kinda dissolved once Intel started having financial troubles and the driver program seemed to have kinda went with it.

    So that leaves me with … reservations.

  8. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 36604, member: 1367″]
    Since I don’t want to end on a negative note: I do sincerely hope that AMD is able to redouble their efforts in the GPU space. Things do look a bit bleak, but we’re also in position for AMD to pull off another Radeon 9700 Pro too!
    [/QUOTE]

    The comment about Intel and AMD competing for fab capacity is very valid. Intel can afford to buy priority – I don’t know that AMD can, and AMD only has the benefit of foresight getting in bed with TSMC as soon as their contact with GF allowed them to, which was before a lot of other players.

    That said, the other part of this that should worry AMD, is that of the capacity they do have, they currently have to split it internally between CPU and GPU production. Which hurts even further when it comes to the GPU race.

    And that’s without mentioning Apple. Who may as well own TSMC now, and everyone, including Intel, are just getting whatever capacity is left over after Apple gets their choice of it.

    AMD really needs to diversify their process nodes and start spreading their various products around a bit, it’s a very critical Achille’s heel right now for them.

  9. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 36628, member: 96″]
    I don’t know if I would go that far. Their driver support cadence is… abysmal. And for a gaming card, those drivers have tweaks/updates with every major game release. Intel drivers are more like every other year. They are almost always very stable and mature, but they don’t get frequent updates.
    [/QUOTE]
    A will and a way, I think; it seems pretty silly to optimize AAA titles for Intel graphics when the hardware tops out at IGP level, and vise-versa for drivers on Intel’s side.

    Intel just has the resources and know-how (or resources to buy the know-how) to really keep up should they wind up with hardware on the shelves that’s worth buying, IMO.

    [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 36633, member: 96″]
    That said, the other part of this that should worry AMD, is that of the capacity they do have, they currently have to split it internally between CPU and GPU production. Which hurts even further when it comes to the GPU race.

    And that’s without mentioning Apple. Who may as well own TSMC now, and everyone, including Intel, are just getting whatever capacity is left over after Apple gets their choice of it.
    [/QUOTE]
    And Apple is coming after Microsoft – which is the only vibe I get from Windows 11. That Microsoft’s actually worried about Apple again.

    I think they’re right to be 🙂

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