Image: Microsoft

Microsoft has shared a new blog post to explain away concerns that enthusiasts have had over the minimum system requirements of its upcoming and increasingly controversial operating system, Windows 11. In its blog post, Microsoft explained that the reason why it is being so strict with Windows 11’s CPU requirements is so it can ensure support for various new security protections, which require chips with an embedded TPM and secure boot, VBS, and specific VBS capabilities. Microsoft is testing devices with 7th Gen Intel Core processors and first-generation AMD Ryzen processors to see if they qualify for Windows 11 support, however. Microsoft has also pulled its PC Health Check app so it can improved with a better level of detail and accuracy.

  1. Security. Windows 11 raises the bar for security by requiring hardware that can enable protections like Windows Hello, Device Encryption, virtualization-based security (VBS), hypervisor-protected code integrity (HVCI) and Secure Boot. The combination of these features has been shown to reduce malware by 60% on tested devices. To meet the principle, all Windows 11 supported CPUs have an embedded TPM, support secure boot, and support VBS and specific VBS capabilities.
  2. Reliability. Devices upgraded to Windows 11 will be in a supported and reliable state. By choosing CPUs that have adopted the new Windows Driver model and are supported by our OEM and silicon partners who are achieving a 99.8% crash free experience.
  3. Compatibility. Windows 11 is designed to be compatible with the apps you use. It has the fundamentals of >1GHz, 2-core processors, 4GB memory, and 64GB of storage, aligning with our minimum system requirements for Office and Microsoft Teams.

Using the principles above, we are confident that devices running on Intel 8th generation processors and AMD Zen 2 as well as Qualcomm 7 and 8 Series will meet our principles around security and reliability and minimum system requirements for Windows 11. As we release to Windows Insiders and partner with our OEMs, we will test to identify devices running on Intel 7th generation and AMD Zen 1 that may meet our principles.

Source: Microsoft

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8 Comments

  1. Not a very good explanation IMHO.

    I want them to explain EXACTLY what TPM2 and Secureboot are going to be used for.

    If it winds up being used for DRM, or to restrict third party operating systems from being installed on any device, the pitchforks are going to come out.

    It’s a fine line to walk. They can extole the virtues of security as much as they want, but at the same time if it is used in any way at all to block anything at all I used to want to do on MY computer, or enforce buying certain software through the Microsoft Store, I am going to be livid.

  2. As much as I would like to give it a shot, I’m not jumping thru upgrade hoops. The APU’s I’d want are expensive and hard to get. The 2400G box is up for experimenting, but the other systems will stay safely at 10.

    I honestly believe there is no real reason why a 2400G isn’t compatible and it’ll work, or will eventually work, or it’s just not meant to be. My own honest desire to run 11 is curiosity alone. As mentioned before, every other MS OS is trash. I held out on XP till 7, then moved up to 10.
    7 was my favorite so far, but advances in science and all that….

  3. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 36851, member: 203″]
    If it winds up being used for DRM, or to restrict third party operating systems from being installed on any device, the pitchforks are going to come out.

    It’s a fine line to walk. They can extole the virtues of security as much as they want, but at the same time if it is used in any way at all to block anything at all I used to want to do on MY computer, or enforce buying certain software through the Microsoft Store, I am going to be livid.
    [/QUOTE]
    Any restrictions along this line would be new; I already run multiple OSs (including four or five Linux distros) on TPM-enabled machines. One is a Dell XPS 15 which should have TPM 2.0 with Secure Boot.

  4. [QUOTE=”hubaduba, post: 36903, member: 1423″]
    Microsoft’s definition of security is very different from my definition.
    [/QUOTE]
    They want all of their Telemetry data protected behind TPM2.0, as well as preparing an environment where you NEED Microsoft in order to do anything with the hardware you “own”. Pretty secure for Microsoft if they can pull it off.

  5. mS has been dealing in confusion since win10 launched, if everybody is confused they can gaslight us pretty easily.

  6. Well I took the plunge to try it out. Gaming machine can deal with a potential reformat if needed to get back to a clean Win 10 install. So far no issues but I have only used it for about an hour.

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