Conclusion

Overall, our experiences testing the BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE were extremely positive. Everything just worked despite the platform’s relatively short time since it was launched. Everything from network to integrated audio performed precisely as you would hope they would. The UEFI implementation is excellent and there’s nothing about the layout that would be a cause for concern.

The motherboard seems generally well built and it was utterly reliable in our testing. The active fan cooling on the VRMs is the key to making sure enthusiast-class Intel CPUs are not bottlenecked or held back by VRM throttling. That means this tiny mini-ITX motherboard, with a big fat Intel Z590 chipset can run the latest Rocket Lake CPUs, all the way up to the fastest versions. The heat is managed well, and the small form factor won’t cramp your CPU. You will also be able to fully benefit from PCI-Express 4.0 GPUs and M.2 NVMe SSD. This really is a small powerhouse for the gamer looking for a tiny build.

Final Points

If you are looking for a Z590 chipset-based mini-ITX form factor motherboard for an SFF build, then the BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE has a lot to offer. Exquisite stability, solid features, and enthusiast-grade VRM’s. The biggest issue here is the fact that at the time of this writing, this board is hard to find in terms of availability. If you do find one, the MSRP should be around $359 US. If you can find it in stock and if you want a mini-ITX, LGA1200 socket motherboard, the BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE is certainly worth consideration. It’s a fantastic board that does everything well.

Given our absolutely flawless testing experiences, we are giving the BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE our silver award. Our time with this motherboard was basically perfect. From unboxing, to set up to stress testing it did everything well. The only thing holding it back is availability and a high price point due to tariffs, though that could change.

Discussion

The FPS Review Silver Award
BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE

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8 Comments

  1. Another good review of the mobo by FPS.

    Personally tho, my experience with Biostar from back in the day make me shudder still
    It’s good to see they can produce a decent board these days.
    I however would be hard pressed to spend $350 on a Biostar when there are better to be found.

    Of course, this is all personal preference on my part.

  2. BIOSTAR has actually been making good motherboards for close to ten years now. That being said, I’ve always reviewed their higher end or more enthusiast centric options. I haven’t worked with their bargain basement stuff since the early 2000’s. My experiences with that stuff were few and far between and not really all that bad to tell you the truth.

    When I think of cheap, shitty motherboards I think of ECS, FIC, or PC Chips. There are also many others that died off like M-Tech, Soyo, and QDI. Not to say that those were all terrible, they weren’t necessarily. Although, they all did have some awful models. Soyo being the exception out of that list as it generally had good PR and absolutely horrendous motherboards.

    EDIT: It seems PCChips died off sometime around the socket 478 / S754 era. FIC actually left the PC business entirely and transitioned to making electronics for the automotive industry. I think Soyo, M-Tech and QDI flat died off the same way ABIT did.

    1. PC Chips merged with ECS, who still does ODM work. I think their last notable consumer board was NZXT’s Z370.

  3. Nice review. I have used a few Biostar motherboards in budget builds with no issues. I remember Soyo back in the day, with their Dragon series motherboards being the most popular. I was mostly into ABIT and Epox boards back then, but found the Epox quality lacking after a while.

  4. [QUOTE=”Niner51, post: 38402, member: 106″]
    Nice review. I have used a few Biostar motherboards in budget builds with no issues. I remember Soyo back in the day, with their Dragon series motherboards being the most popular. I was mostly into ABIT and Epox boards back then, but found the Epox quality lacking after a while.
    [/QUOTE]

    Epox quality was lackluster to start with. ABIT at that time had their own issues but they straightened them out. Unfortunately, by the end of their run as a company their motherboards were mediocre at best. The Soyo’s were always popular, and I can’t understand why. I saw a lot of failures on those.

  5. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 38405, member: 6″]
    The Soyo’s were always popular, and I can’t understand why.
    [/QUOTE]

    I honestly think it was mostly their name and color scheme back then (black and purple). I remember all those jumpers on their boards as well. A past friend of mine loved those boards, but he would have all types of issues at LAN parties. Epox had cap bursting issues which I experienced. Never really had an issue with Abit besides one NF2 board dying on me, but that was overclocking a 2500+ to a 3200+ which was popular back in the day. Thanks for the trip down memory lane Dan..(y)

  6. [QUOTE=”AKBrian, post: 38765, member: 120″]
    PC Chips merged with ECS, who still does ODM work. I think their last notable consumer board was NZXT’s Z370.
    [/QUOTE]

    I didn’t know that. Although, I do know the NZXT Z490 boards are made by ASRock.

  7. I have a B550 Biostar board with a 3900x, no issues and one of the few board I’ve ever owned that has zero problems going to sleep and back. Now the VRMs on that board I would say is shaky but I am not OCing. With two (one super cheap and the other kinda cheap) Biostar boards, they purred with no real issues plus actually had frequent bios updates for a long period of time.

    Very nice review Dan, to me the price seems high but today everything seems to be way high.

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