Overclocking & Power

Overclocking

Overclocking with the BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE was relatively easy. The UEFI makes the overclocking process relatively simple as it’s easy to find all of the relevant settings and it provides enough options to satisfy most people’s needs. Now, it does allow for per-core overclocking, which is really the way to go with today’s CPUs. Our all-core overclock results indicate that overclocking in that way is rarely beneficial. That being said, there is thermal headroom to go further than we did, but I wasn’t able to dial in viable settings which would achieve complete stability.

Increasing the CPU voltage to 1.45v wasn’t sufficient for stability, but it got us in the ballpark. Increasing the CPU load-line calibration to level 4 was all that was needed to get us a maximum stable all-core overclock of 5.1GHz at temperatures that did not exceed 81c. Temperatures usually hovered in the 78-79c range meaning there is room for more. With additional time, I think 5.2GHz is certainly possible on this particular 11900K. The VRM implementation of the BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE is certainly capable enough of handling such an overclock given that its power stages are 90A each.

When it comes to memory clock, the DDR4 3733MHz result is actually beyond what that RAM is rated for. Normally it’s spec’ed for DDR4 3600MHz from G.Skill. However, I’ve found that it normally can reach 3733MHz at 1.36v in most cases. The IMC of our sample 11900K and the BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE made duplicating this result rather easy. I have no doubt you can push well beyond this with faster-rated memory.

Power Consumption

Power consumption is measured at the wall using a Kil-A-Watt device. We also used HWiNFO to figure out how close the results were, and within a reasonable margin of error, the results can be considered accurate. Do keep in mind that two water pumps and the GPU are part of the equation, but our testing configuration is lean on things like storage. Only the test system is plugged into the Kil-A-Watt, and as a result, peripherals like the monitor aren’t being measured here.

Results were obtained at idle on a fresh boot of the system. We let the system idle for five minutes before checking idle power consumption. Load testing was conducted using Cinebench to simulate a heavily multi-threaded workload. During the duration of the run, load power is observed and the readings are recorded.

BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE Motherboard Power Testing
BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE Motherboard Power Testing Overclocking

Idle, our Intel Core i9-11900K equipped BIOSTAR Z590I VALKYRIE only consumed around 101w. Under load, it consumed a whopping 446w. However, overclocked our idle power changed to 109w but actually improved under load coming in at 368w.

The reason for this is likely that the Rocket Lake architecture is rather efficient at 5.1GHz or lower, which is where our CPU was clocked at. When pushing the boost clocks past that, the CPU becomes rather inefficient. CPUs do tend to do this when pushed to the limits of what they are capable of in terms of clock speed. We’ve seen this time and time again from processors coming out of both AMD and Intel.

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8 Comments

  1. Another good review of the mobo by FPS.

    Personally tho, my experience with Biostar from back in the day make me shudder still
    It’s good to see they can produce a decent board these days.
    I however would be hard pressed to spend $350 on a Biostar when there are better to be found.

    Of course, this is all personal preference on my part.

  2. BIOSTAR has actually been making good motherboards for close to ten years now. That being said, I’ve always reviewed their higher end or more enthusiast centric options. I haven’t worked with their bargain basement stuff since the early 2000’s. My experiences with that stuff were few and far between and not really all that bad to tell you the truth.

    When I think of cheap, shitty motherboards I think of ECS, FIC, or PC Chips. There are also many others that died off like M-Tech, Soyo, and QDI. Not to say that those were all terrible, they weren’t necessarily. Although, they all did have some awful models. Soyo being the exception out of that list as it generally had good PR and absolutely horrendous motherboards.

    EDIT: It seems PCChips died off sometime around the socket 478 / S754 era. FIC actually left the PC business entirely and transitioned to making electronics for the automotive industry. I think Soyo, M-Tech and QDI flat died off the same way ABIT did.

    1. PC Chips merged with ECS, who still does ODM work. I think their last notable consumer board was NZXT’s Z370.

  3. Nice review. I have used a few Biostar motherboards in budget builds with no issues. I remember Soyo back in the day, with their Dragon series motherboards being the most popular. I was mostly into ABIT and Epox boards back then, but found the Epox quality lacking after a while.

  4. [QUOTE=”Niner51, post: 38402, member: 106″]
    Nice review. I have used a few Biostar motherboards in budget builds with no issues. I remember Soyo back in the day, with their Dragon series motherboards being the most popular. I was mostly into ABIT and Epox boards back then, but found the Epox quality lacking after a while.
    [/QUOTE]

    Epox quality was lackluster to start with. ABIT at that time had their own issues but they straightened them out. Unfortunately, by the end of their run as a company their motherboards were mediocre at best. The Soyo’s were always popular, and I can’t understand why. I saw a lot of failures on those.

  5. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 38405, member: 6″]
    The Soyo’s were always popular, and I can’t understand why.
    [/QUOTE]

    I honestly think it was mostly their name and color scheme back then (black and purple). I remember all those jumpers on their boards as well. A past friend of mine loved those boards, but he would have all types of issues at LAN parties. Epox had cap bursting issues which I experienced. Never really had an issue with Abit besides one NF2 board dying on me, but that was overclocking a 2500+ to a 3200+ which was popular back in the day. Thanks for the trip down memory lane Dan..(y)

  6. [QUOTE=”AKBrian, post: 38765, member: 120″]
    PC Chips merged with ECS, who still does ODM work. I think their last notable consumer board was NZXT’s Z370.
    [/QUOTE]

    I didn’t know that. Although, I do know the NZXT Z490 boards are made by ASRock.

  7. I have a B550 Biostar board with a 3900x, no issues and one of the few board I’ve ever owned that has zero problems going to sleep and back. Now the VRMs on that board I would say is shaky but I am not OCing. With two (one super cheap and the other kinda cheap) Biostar boards, they purred with no real issues plus actually had frequent bios updates for a long period of time.

    Very nice review Dan, to me the price seems high but today everything seems to be way high.

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