Image: Visceral Games

Eric Baptizat has updated his LinkedIn page to confirm that he’s the game director for the Dead Space remake. He recently announced he’d left Ubisoft to join EA Motive to work on a then-unannounced game. The former Assassins’ Creed Valhalla director is now working alongside a veritable who’s-who of game developers who worked on notable games such as Batman: Arkham Origins, the Mass Effect series, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and Star Wars Squadrons.

Image: Ubisoft

Baptizat had worked at Ubisoft for 16 years, most notably as the director of Valhalla, and the lead designer for other Assassin’s Creed entries including Origins, and Black Flag.

Source: Eric Baptizat (via VGC)

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Peter Brosdahl

As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my...

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7 Comments

  1. And that’s why it is impossible to trust game developers, it’s a terrible industry in terms of fluctuation. No loyalty whatsoever. Game designers move around all the time, so when one company makes a good game by the next project half or more of the key people who worked on it are gone.

  2. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 38736, member: 1298″]
    And that’s why it is impossible to trust game developers, it’s a terrible industry in terms of fluctuation. No loyalty whatsoever. Game designers move around all the time, so when one company makes a good game by the next project half or more of the key people who worked on it are gone.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah.

    I’d say that’s more on the publishers not providing enough incentive to keep talent than it is any indication of loyalty of the developers/designers – especially given how prevalent it is in the industry.

    You see an awful lot of talent break away from the big names to start their own shops – and more often than not they put out one or two mediocre titles there and then you never hear from them again. I am assuming because they realize it’s easy to come up with big ideas, but it’s hard to pay for them, so they probably end up going back to the big names again where they can keep getting their paychecks signed.

  3. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 38738, member: 96″]
    I’d say that’s more on the publishers not providing enough incentive to keep talent than it is any indication of loyalty of the developers/designers – especially given how prevalent it is in the industry.
    [/QUOTE]
    Well, I see that as an ego problem, if their salary was enough incentive for them before their game got famous why isn’t it enough later? I don’t think game developers are different than anyone else, they are doing a job. If I got a raise after every project I successfully completed I’d be swimming in money.

  4. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 38740, member: 1298″]
    Well, I see that as an ego problem, if their salary was enough incentive for them before their game got famous why isn’t it enough later? I don’t think game developers are different than anyone else, they are doing a job. If I got a raise after every project I successfully completed I’d be swimming in money.
    [/QUOTE]
    I think it’s more a matter of creative license – the developers want to make “their” game, publishers want them to make what sells. Those are usually at odds.

  5. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 38742, member: 96″]
    I think it’s more a matter of creative license – the developers want to make “their” game, publishers want them to make what sells. Those are usually at odds.
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s still an ego problem. We saw “star” designers put out bad games too often when given free reign. Just think daikatana, or the hubris of bioware thinking “dylan” will be the most successful game ever made.

  6. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 38759, member: 1298″]
    That’s still an ego problem. We saw “star” designers put out bad games too often when given free reign. Just think daikatana, or the hubris of bioware thinking “dylan” will be the most successful game ever made.
    [/QUOTE]
    Sure, but you also will never get a new or unique game if your just cranking out Flavor of the Month titles and sequels to satisfy your shareholders.

    It’s a double-edged sword.

  7. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 38770, member: 96″]
    Sure, but you also will never get a new or unique game if your just cranking out Flavor of the Month titles and sequels to satisfy your shareholders.

    It’s a double-edged sword.
    [/QUOTE]
    They aren’t making new games anyway. Almost everything is an nth iteration of the same tired ip, or worse a remake or reboot. There are maybe 1 new ips to 20 re-hashes, or less in the AAA industry, and even the new ip’s end up chasing trends instead of being something unique.

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