Image: NVIDIA

NVIDIA began shipping a revised lineup of GeForce RTX 30 Series graphics cards in May with a tweaked ETH hash rate that reduces their mining performance by 50 percent. Carrying the LHR (lite hash rate) designation, they were released in an attempt to secure more graphics cards for gamers rather than miners, many of whom have apparently been buying up significant amounts of GPUs.

Unfortunately for NVIDIA (and gamers), the new anti-mining measures implemented in the GeForce RTX 30 Series (sans GeForce RTX 3090) may no longer be an effective deterrent.

As indicated in a recent changelog, the developers behind a piece of software called NBMiner have figured out a way to get around NVIDIA’s LHR clamp and restore around 70 percent of the ETH mining performance that the original GeForce RTX 30 Series graphics cards are capable of. 

While it isn’t clear how the developers behind NBMiner managed to sidestep NVIDIA’s restrictions, miners may use the software to boost the hash rate of LHR GPUs and adjust it via various parameters. The developers have advised setting the tuning value to 68, as that value has been tested to be stable one most systems.

Image: NBMiner

NBMiner 39.0

  • feature: ethash New LHR mode for ETH mining on RTX 30 series LHR GPUs, supports Windows & Linux, able to get ~70% of maximum unlocked hashrate.
    • This mode can be tuned by argument -lhr, only works for ethash right now.
    • -lhr default to 0, meaning even if -lhr is not set, LHR mode with -lhr 68 will be applied to LHR GPUs if certain GPUs are detected.
    • Tune LHR mode by setting -lhr <value>, a specific value will tell miner try to reach value percent of maximum unlocker hashrate, e.g. -lhr 68 will expect to get 68% of hashrate for same model non-LHR GPU.
    • Higher -lhr value will results in higher hashrate, but has higher possibility to run into lock state, which will leads to much less hashrate.
    • A good start tuning value is 68, which has been tested to be stable on most rig configurations.
    • -lhr value can be set for each GPU by using comma separeted list, -lhr 65,68,0,-1, where -1 means turn off LHR mode.

Source: GitHub

Don’t Miss Out on More FPS Review Content!

Our weekly newsletter includes a recap of our reviews and a run down of the most popular tech news that we published.

Join the Conversation

10 Comments

  1. Mining is dead where it was a boss at, in China, ME and S. Asia.

    It’s barely alive in the States but recent reports states that Cali, etc. are cracking down hard on mining due to extreme energy consumption.

    Mining will never turn back to what it was late 2020 / 1H21.

    These reports are mostly from crooks that are hoping for another gpu scalping frenzy. e.g. crooked AIB partners, Newegg, etc.

  2. I wouldn’t call it dead. I’m still making $35-40 a day on my rig. Though all of my cards have long since paid for themselves 7x over, and electricity is cheap in NC.

  3. I use all my old cards(long since paid off and mostly retired), and at one time I couldn’t give away, for occasional mining. It’s not much but brings in around $20 a day when I can. Meanwhile we also just got solar to offset the power draw and reduce our AC bill(I don’t mine on hot days btw). Meanwhile, even at current rates a few days a month is enough to help pay for the new system, and come winter will help heat the house(lol).

    It does bum me when people find an end run for LHR. I do believe there should be two separate products so gamers are not screwed in the process. I am not at all happy with what became of the market in recent years.

  4. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 39657, member: 4″]
    I wouldn’t call it dead. I’m still making $35-40 a day on my rig. Though all of my cards have long since paid for themselves 7x over, and electricity is cheap in NC.
    [/QUOTE]
    That is literally your only consideration? People always whine about the “nanny state” but then when left to their own devices this crap happens. No regard for tomorrow whatsoever. Zero fs given.

  5. I’m surprised it took them this long. When there is money and motivation on the line these things generally go much faster.

    This was never going to be anything but a gesture on Nvidias part. They get paid either way, whether it is miners or gamers buying their product, so they don’t [I]really [/I] care.

  6. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 39684, member: 1298″]
    That is literally your only consideration? People always whine about the “nanny state” but then when left to their own devices this crap happens. No regard for tomorrow whatsoever. Zero fs given.
    [/QUOTE]

    Not quite sure wtf your whining about.

  7. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 39700, member: 203″]
    I’m surprised it took them this long. When there is money and motivation on the line these things generally go much faster.

    This was never going to be anything but a gesture on Nvidias part. They get paid either way, whether it is miners or gamers buying their product, so they don’t [I]really [/I] care.
    [/QUOTE]
    If NVIDIA did it right though, they would get paid a lot more selling cards to miners.

  8. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 39738, member: 1041″]
    If NVIDIA did it right though, they would get paid a lot more selling cards to miners.
    [/QUOTE]

    From my understanding they were. So were AIB’s. Both were unloading product directly to chinese mining card manufacturers and mining farms at 10-20% above average pricing. Not only were they making a higher percentage on the sale, they saved a ton of money by not having to ship product all over the world.

  9. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 39765, member: 4″]
    From my understanding they were. So were AIB’s. Both were unloading product directly to chinese mining card manufacturers and mining farms at 10-20% above average pricing. Not only were they making a higher percentage on the sale, they saved a ton of money by not having to ship product all over the world.
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s thinking small. Probably could have gotten 100%-200% over msrp.

Leave a comment