Image: NVIDIA

NVIDIA has relied on Samsung to build its GeForce RTX 30 Series GPUs, but those ties are being cut for green team’s next exciting generation of graphics cards.

This is according to prominent leaker kopite7kimi, who has confidently stated that NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 40 Series will leverage an advanced process from the world’s most successful semiconductor foundry, TSMC. The GeForce RTX 40 Series is expected to be built on TSMC’s 5-nanometer process.

What’s also interesting is that NVIDIA will reportedly release its first GeForce RTX 40 Series graphics cards sooner than expected. Kopite7kimi claims that Ampere’s successors will “come out a little bit earlier,” which suggests that the GeForce RTX 40 Series might surface before September 2022. (NVIDIA began shipping its first GeForce RTX 20 Series and GeForce RTX 30 Series graphics cards on September 20, 2018 and September 17, 2020, respectively.)

NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 40 Series graphics cards are believed to leverage the new Lovelace architecture and maintain a traditional monolithic design. This is in contrast to AMD, whose Radeon RX 7000 Series will purportedly include radical models with a multi-chip module design.

Source: kopite7kimi

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28 Comments

  1. Hmm..

    4000 series and 3090 Ti Super Special Edition both within a month or two of each other?

    Nah…

  2. [QUOTE=”Auer, post: 40455, member: 225″]
    [SIZE=7][B]Expected to Launch Sooner than Expected[/B][/SIZE]
    [/QUOTE]
    [IMG]https://memegenerator.net/img/instances/71760538/i-never-learned-to-read.jpg[/IMG]

  3. Tip for Nvidia – stockpile for 6 months prior to release. In the mean time, rake in the cash from the 3k series.

  4. So, when was it expected to be expected and when to we expect to expect it? :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

  5. Its just that the date rumor is rumoured different than the initial rumor.
    These rumors and rumoring can be anything really.
    One thing is not a rumor, it will be fast, overpriced and unavailable.

  6. [QUOTE=”Auer, post: 40455, member: 225″]
    [SIZE=7][B]Expected to Launch Sooner than Expected[/B][/SIZE]
    [/QUOTE]

    I’m glad I’m not the only one that chuckled at that.

    It’s almost like it’s a recursive loop!

  7. Looking forward to it. Maybe I can run full everything at 144hz at 1440p. Without any kind of reverse lowering the image resolution bullshit required.

  8. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 40474, member: 215″]
    Looking forward to it. Maybe I can run full everything at 144hz at 1440p. Without any kind of reverse lowering the image resolution bullshit required.
    [/QUOTE]
    Depends on the game right?
    I always expect AAA titles that are released after the launch of a new GPU series to challenge the hardware, sometimes bringing it to it’s knees.
    Part of the fun isnt it? 🙂

  9. [QUOTE=”Auer, post: 40485, member: 225″]
    Depends on the game right?
    I always expect AAA titles that are released after the launch of a new GPU series to challenge the hardware, sometimes bringing it to it’s knees.
    Part of the fun isnt it? 🙂
    [/QUOTE]
    Yes it is. I normally get 1 step down from top of the line video card card I refresh just so I don’t pay the stupid high premium. Hence why I also game at 1440p. Then again in super slow on upgrading monitors.

  10. I can only barely even imagine how pointless this next release will be. Sure the performance will be through the roof but I honestly don’t see an end to scalping until people can easily buy what they want and according to NV the current supply issues will last until this ‘sooner than expected’ launch and I’m pretty sure even longer.

    My real questions are where are all these cards going? Between the mining crackdown in China, and the LHR versions, shouldn’t we be seeing more inventory? Granted the LHRs can be hacked but even then it’s not that impressive when done. So once again, where is all this supposed inventory going?

    Meanwhile BB had something like 12,000 cards(mostly FE from what I read) they sent to select stores last week as if 12,000 spread across the US should be anything meaningful. That’s not enough for one state let alone multiple ones. I was reading a post in a thread on the weekend how a writer for Tom’s went to one of the stores in Colorado and said the folks in those lines didn’t exactly seem to be the gaming variety either. Obviously shouldn’t judge a book by its cover but he said they looked pretty rough around the edges and not exactly the types who would answer questions on what they planned to do with the cards.

  11. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 40534, member: 87″]

    My real questions are where are all these cards going? Between the mining crackdown in China, and the LHR versions, shouldn’t we be seeing more inventory? Granted the LHRs can be hacked but even then it’s not that impressive when done. So once again, where is all this supposed inventory going?

    [/QUOTE]
    I’ve got a news article for you 😉

    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://forums.thefpsreview.com/threads/court-orders-nearly-half-million-gpus-returned-to-mining-operator.6615/[/URL]

    Basically, if 1 mining company is willing to buy 500,000 cards 4-5 years ago, before the crypto boom, then you better believe they are willing to buy 1m+ cards now.

    Since LHR cards can still be used for alt coins, I have no doubt the miners are still buying them up like mad. When Nvidia really figures how to limit mining to force miners to pay triple for their cards, then we will see inventory again. Right now, miners get the bulk of the supply, which in turn limits quantity available to the public. This allows the scalpers to scoop up the remaining inventory and sell the cards for 800-2500 depending on card type.

    MSRP will continue to be a myth (and shouldn’t even be used in real discussion) until the above supply situation is resolved.

  12. [QUOTE=”Auer, post: 40455, member: 225″]
    [SIZE=7][B]Expected to Launch Sooner than Expected[/B][/SIZE]
    [/QUOTE]

    -She said

  13. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 40534, member: 87″]
    I was reading a post in a thread on the weekend how a writer for Tom’s went to one of the stores in Colorado and said the folks in those lines didn’t exactly seem to be the gaming variety either. Obviously shouldn’t judge a book by its cover but he said they looked pretty rough around the edges and not exactly the types who would answer questions on what they planned to do with the cards.
    [/QUOTE]
    Much as I’ve thought about it, I don’t see a means for vendors to limit sales to consumers, let alone ‘gamers’. The only thing that separates miners from other consumers is how much they want the cards, and how much they’re willing to pay.

  14. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 40557, member: 1367″]
    Much as I’ve thought about it, I don’t see a means for vendors to limit sales to consumers, let alone ‘gamers’. The only thing that separates miners from other consumers is how much they want the cards, and how much they’re willing to pay.
    [/QUOTE]

    The issue is not who buy’s them as long as they can meet demand.

    They could also make cards that are better suited for mining making the gaming ones less desirable

  15. [QUOTE=”Denpepe, post: 40558, member: 284″]
    The issue is not who buy’s them as long as they can meet demand.

    They could also make cards that are better suited for mining making the gaming ones less desirable
    [/QUOTE]
    The problem is there is basically infinite demand from miners. Not only do they make money using the cards , but if they buy enough of them they can start to corner the “hash” market and keep an edge on payouts. Even if NVidia / AMD make more desirable mining cards, the miners will buy those and the gaming cards too. The only solution is to make the cards mine terribly (good luck detecting all the alt coins) or raise the price so much that miners don’t buy them given the long RoI.

  16. [QUOTE=”DrezKill, post: 40636, member: 230″]
    I really f*cking miss when cryptocurrency mining wasn’t even a thing that existed.
    [/QUOTE]
    I have enjoyed using my old cards to make some extra side change but I don’t even remotely think it’s worth the price of what we’re experiencing now. I agree with you. I’d be much happier if it didn’t and we could all enjoy our tech w/o all this insanity.

    On the flipside proof-of-stake for ethereum is around the corner. The major downside is that type will likely just make it so the rich get richer since those who have the most get the most and everyone else gets left behind. However, it’s difficult to say if another proof-of-work coin won’t move in to fill the void.

  17. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 40644, member: 87″]
    I have enjoyed using my old cards to make some extra side change but I don’t even remotely think it’s worth the price of what we’re experiencing now. I agree with you. I’d be much happier if it didn’t and we could all enjoy our tech w/o all this insanity.

    On the flipside proof-of-stake for ethereum is around the corner. The major downside is that type will likely just make it so the rich get richer since those who have the most get the most and everyone else gets left behind. However, it’s difficult to say if another proof-of-work coin won’t move in to fill the void.
    [/QUOTE]

    Honestly, I feel about crypto, the same way I felt about .com’s in the 90’s.

    Back then I thought the hype of .com’s was ridiculous. Sure I liked the tech, and saw that it had great promise, but saw straight through the facade, and realized that these companies might hvae a website but they weren’t using that technology for anything that created value, and that most of them were useless. The tech will surely be important somehow some day, but certainly not these fools, and something is going to have to change first.

    I hate to pat myself on the back but I think young teenager me hit it pretty spot on.

    Crypto feels the same way. The blockchain type tech is interesting, but most if not all of these cryptocurrencies are really not going to amount to anything, and great things are going to have to change if any of them will. Right now calling them “currencies ” is mostly a sham, as their value is just driven from hoarding due to FOMO.

    Something might change eventually, but all of this mining is just consuming tons of resources, and upsetting established markets for no good reason. It’s making some people some money, but that’s just because they are passing off the results to others before we all have a realization of how useless they all are, and the crypto-bubble bursts,

    It’s a real shame.

  18. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 40459, member: 1041″]
    Tip for Nvidia – stockpile for 6 months prior to release. In the mean time, rake in the cash from the 3k series.
    [/QUOTE]
    The first tape out on TSMC’s 5nm was back at the beginning of 2019. Apple’s new phones are using it, I believe. It is possible that NVIDIA have been stockpiling for a while now.

  19. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 40658, member: 180″]
    The first tape out on TSMC’s 5nm was back at the beginning of 2019. Apple’s new phones are using it, I believe. It is possible that NVIDIA have been stockpiling for a while now.
    [/QUOTE]

    That would help, but in all honesty, they could end the problem now if they wanted to.

    1.) AMD/Nvidia could require AIB’s to have no large volume sales other than to end retailers
    2.) As a condition of sale, a contract is signed with the retailer to achieve positive identification of all customers, and have a “max 3 units per customer” type of policy.

    Sure, miners could do the Ephedrine Smurf thing meth cookers used to do, but it likely would seriously cut into their profits and not be very effective. They are only cornering the supply today because they either outright sign mass volume deals directly with the AIB’s or they are buying up supply with bots. Have a positive customer identification scheme in place and you end the latter. The volume sales is a matter of choice. They either make it or they don’t, and thus far they have.

    In the end – however – the supply restriction is on the fab side, not on the video card side, so if they do this, they will likely just find themselves competing with others, maybe ASIC manufacturers for the same fab capacity at TSMC and Samsung and we may find us back here again with short supply as AMD and Nvidia can’t get fab supply.

    It takes 5-10 years and billions of dollars to get a cutting edge fab online, and it is really technically challenging (just look at what happened with Intel’s 10nm. If even Intel can screw it up, it is a real challenge) Globalfoundries and others have just given up on cutting edge fab tech, because it is too difficult.

    Unless something changes to reduce demand for mining (crypto crash?) and other purposes, I think this problem is unfortunately here for the long haul.

    The tech economy has gotten used to readily available latest node fab supply, but the explosion of mobile and IoT and crypto mining, as well as an increased demand for PC gaming parts in the last 5 -10 years has put a huge strain on this supply, at the same time as it is more difficult than ever to actually make these nodes work.

    The “Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors for America Act (CHIPS)” bill might be helpful in this regard if it passes, but it doesn’t seem like it is enough given the extreme expense and difficulty to develop fabs, and even if it passes, results from it are 10 years out.

  20. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 40668, member: 203″]
    That would help, but in all honesty, they could end the problem now if they wanted to.

    1.) AMD/Nvidia could require AIB’s to have no large volume sales other than to end retailers
    2.) As a condition of sale, a contract is signed with the retailer to achieve positive identification of all customers, and have a “max 3 units per customer” type of policy.

    Sure, miners could do the Ephedrine Smurf thing meth cookers used to do, but it likely would seriously cut into their profits and not be very effective. They are only cornering the supply today because they either outright sign mass volume deals directly with the AIB’s or they are buying up supply with bots. Have a positive customer identification scheme in place and you end the latter. The volume sales is a matter of choice. They either make it or they don’t, and thus far they have.

    In the end – however – the supply restriction is on the fab side, not on the video card side, so if they do this, they will likely just find themselves competing with others, maybe ASIC manufacturers for the same fab capacity at TSMC and Samsung and we may find us back here again with short supply as AMD and Nvidia can’t get fab supply.

    It takes 5-10 years and billions of dollars to get a cutting edge fab online, and it is really technically challenging (just look at what happened with Intel’s 10nm. If even Intel can screw it up, it is a real challenge) Globalfoundries and others have just given up on cutting edge fab tech, because it is too difficult.

    Unless something changes to reduce demand for mining (crypto crash?) and other purposes, I think this problem is unfortunately here for the long haul.

    The tech economy has gotten used to readily available latest node fab supply, but the explosion of mobile and IoT and crypto mining, as well as an increased demand for PC gaming parts in the last 5 -10 years has put a huge strain on this supply, at the same time as it is more difficult than ever to actually make these nodes work.

    The “Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors for America Act (CHIPS)” bill might be helpful in this regard if it passes, but it doesn’t seem like it is enough given the extreme expense and difficulty to develop fabs, and even if it passes, results from it are 10 years out.
    [/QUOTE]
    Both of those approaches will hurt NVIDIA’s bottom line, so they will never do that.

  21. [QUOTE=”Armenius, post: 40673, member: 180″]
    Both of those approaches will hurt NVIDIA’s bottom line, so they will never do that.
    [/QUOTE]

    Agreed.

    Unless they are playing the long game and want to build up goodwill with customers now for a time when we don’t have the same supply constrictions / extreme demand we do today. That seems highly unlikely though. They’d rather just pay lip service to the whole problem.

    My point was to show that they COULD do it if they wanted today, but they don’t want to. It is not in their interest.

  22. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 40677, member: 203″]
    Agreed.

    Unless they are playing the long game and want to build up goodwill with customers now for a time when we don’t have the same supply constrictions / extreme demand we do today. That seems highly unlikely though. They’d rather just pay lip service to the whole problem.

    My point was to show that they COULD do it if they wanted today, but they don’t want to. It is not in their interest.
    [/QUOTE]
    It’s in their interest to charge miners more than gamers, because miners will pay more. The interesting question will be how will they implement that.

    if Samsung is going to be making the 3 series for a while, NVidia can just start kicking out only 3060 leaving gamers a gen behind while they sell 4k cards to miners as CMP cards, or they could produce 4k cards at LHR and probably at the 4060 level and tell miners to keep buying 3090s.

  23. Maybe they can start selling cards trough the Valve or EGS store to people with an active account, valve already ships hardware, and limit to one per account.

    I haven’t heard much on Linus’s “scam” of selling cards to real gamers lately, but that was a decent idea though you are still not sure the cards don’t end up on fleabay.

  24. [QUOTE=”Endgame, post: 40679, member: 1041″]
    It’s in their interest to charge miners more than gamers, because miners will pay more. The interesting question will be how will they implement that.
    [/QUOTE]
    Well, to that end, if Person A is willing to pay $, and Person B is willing to pay $$$, for the exact (or near exact) same thing, why would you even bother with Person A?

    Miners will never pay more than gamers so long as gaming GPUs are capable of mining. GPUs will get sold for “market value”, be that by AIBs or scalpers or whomever, and if that’s too much for gamers, or anyone else, to justify, they will just have to do without.

    It does tick me off, there are a lot of things storefronts could do to alleviate the situation – but none of them, past public relations, are incentivized in the least to really implement any of them past a token attempt in the name of public relations. My righteous rage does nothing to change the situation, unfortunately.

    The problem right now is that crypto mining has the illusion of scaling with no ceiling. If each GPU can net you X amount of profit.. then 100 GPUs nets you 100x profit, and 1,000,000 GPUs nets you 1,000,000x profit. That’s a problem with the valuation of crypto right now, and it won’t be an indefinite condition – it can’t be, because there aren’t infinite resources in the world to fund all of that.

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