Image: AMD

AMD has published an advisory warning early Windows 11 adopters that they may see performance degradation in various applications with select, compatible AMD processors.

One of the biggest impacts relates to gaming; AMD says that certain eSports titles may see reduced performance of up to 15 percent. Performance impacts of 3 to 5 percent have also been noted for select applications.

The performance variation in Windows 11 when running compatible AMD Processors is owed to potential increases in L3 cache latency, which may increase by up 3x. AMD hasn’t elaborated on the reason for this but has promised that it is working with Microsoft on a fix that is scheduled for release this month.

Per AMD:

AMD and Microsoft are actively investigating these known issues for resolution via software updates. This knowledge base article will be updated to include version numbers and delivery vehicle(s) when they are available. In the interim, customers using compatible AMD processors affected by these issues may continue to use a supported version of Windows 10.

AMD’s table also warns of an issue in which threads may not be scheduled properly, resulting in reduced performance in select applications. The degradation is more likely to be detected in processors with more than 8 cores and TDP of over 65 watts.

Microsoft’s official list of Windows 11-supported AMD processors can be found here.

Source: AMD

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12 Comments

  1. As I have said elsewhere, this is why you don’t rush to update to the latest versions of anything software (unless it is a critical security fix!)

    I only updated my Linux servers from 16.04 LTS to 18.04 LTS a few months ago when they finally lost security patching support (without paying extra for subscribed ESM). There are 7 newer Ubuntu server versions (one of them an LTS) than the ones I just installed [IMG alt=”😛”]https://static.xx.fbcdn.net/images/emoji.php/v9/t9f/1/16/1f61b.png[/IMG]

    Being an early adopter of software often has few if any benefits, and very many pitfalls. it’s not like hardware where you have to have the newest greatest thing. Just chill and let them work out the bugs on some other poor fools.

    I’m not saying I’ll wait until 2025 when Win10 loses support to move to Win11, but certainly waiting 6 months to a year isn’t a bad idea.

  2. I’ll probably get Windows 11 on my test bench relatively soon. It will be awhile before I do it on my personal computer.

  3. I was an early adopter from Vistas>7>8>8.1>10 just to get the graphics APIs for gaming but at the moment I don’t really have enough interest or time to tinker with 11. I’m thinking by spring I’ll get around to it but I do find it sad to see something like this happen. It harkens back to those horrible experiences I was seeing with Windows update for a while where you never know what was getting broken until after the fact. The last 12 months haven’t been so bad but there was a stretch of around 24 months that really got on my nerves for a while. Between them and borked NV drivers I really came to dread updates. A new OS, I’ll wait.

  4. There have actually been two so far. This one, which only affects AMD processors, and a second, which is from a virtualized security setting that is only enabled by default from a clean installation (if you upgrade from Win10 in place, it defaults off).

  5. Can’t speak for Ryzen, but I’ve been running Windows 11 Pro on my main PC with zero hits to gaming. I doubt it would affect AMD that much either.

  6. The game I mainly play, Hunt:Showdown, is playing the same as it did in Windows 10.

    I have Windows 11 installed on mine, my wife’s, and my daughter’s PC’s without issue.

    5900x, 5800x, 5600x .. B550 and 2 x X570 chipsets.

    My 12 year old daughter plays lots of games on her setup .. I don’t think she would notice/care about a possible 3-5% degradation in performance with Fortnite, Rocket League, Minecraft, Destiny 2, Forza 4 .. and more that I can’t think of right now.

    Still .. not a good look for AMD when trying to gain market share… even though they’ve been in bed with Microsoft for awhile now, you’d think something like this wouldn’t be a thing or would have been figured out by now. I guess all the XBox development doesn’t carry over to Windows .. ?

  7. [QUOTE=”ThreeDee, post: 42199, member: 164″]

    Still .. not a good look for AMD when trying to gain market share… even though they’ve been in bed with Microsoft for awhile now, you’d think something like this wouldn’t be a thing or would have been figured out by now. I guess all the XBox development doesn’t carry over to Windows .. ?
    [/QUOTE]
    And this is AMD’s doing how?

  8. [QUOTE=”ThreeDee, post: 42201, member: 164″]
    it doesn’t matter if it’s “AMD’s doing” or not
    [/QUOTE]
    This is true, but if it actually gets fixed this October no one will remember it by November.

    A slowdown isn’t what you want to have, but it’s a lot better than, say, your system crashes repeatedly or some data loss bug.

  9. Huh… I wonder if Intel tested on Windows 11 to get their performance advantage? Naaaa probably not right.

  10. Combine this with an Xbox One bluetooth controller and you will be rocking all your games at 10fps o_O

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