Image: AMD

AMD has confirmed that it will release refreshed versions of its Ryzen 5000 Series processors with 3D V-Cache technology in early 2022. The technology brings a larger amount of cache to the Zen 3 chips, enabling up to a 15 percent uplift in gaming performance. Benchmarks from AMD show a 1.25x improvement in titles such as Capcom’s Monster Hunter World on a 12-core 3D chiplet prototype versus the Ryzen 9 5900X at 4 GHz.

From AMD:

Join John Taylor, AMD Chief Marketing Officer, and Robert Hallock, Director of Technical Marketing, as they reflect on how AMD Ryzen processors have repeatedly shocked the industry with its power and performance, as well as look ahead at what the future brings for these powerhouse processors.

AMD has also confirmed that its AM5 platform will launch in 2022. The new platform will feature support for both PCIe 5.0 and DDR5 memory.

Source: AMD

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17 Comments

  1. I’m glad to see this! I haven’t gotten around to upgrading my 2700X yet despite it being in near continuous use, and now I can wait a bit and time it with the stacked vCache refresh in a few months.

    It also seems that you’ve scooped all the other sites around – haven’t seen this bit of news anywhere else.

  2. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 42440, member: 215″]
    I didn’t see mention of existing am4 socket or will this move to the next am generation?
    [/QUOTE]
    100% the refresh is still AM4

  3. Nice! My 3700x is still doing the job but I’ve been itching to upgrade my 4 year old X370 motherboard, PSU and AIO cooler. This would be a great excuse to do just that without the hassle of waiting another year or so for the AM5 chips.

  4. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 42454, member: 215″]
    This could be the cpu refresh I’ve been waiting for.
    [/QUOTE]
    [ATTACH type=”full”]1281[/ATTACH]

  5. Nice! But I think the odds of getting a bios update for my old Asrock x470 mobo is unlikely. 2700x still going stong

  6. I might bite the bullet on one of these as a last ditch upgrade to my X570 platform. Get a few more years out of it.

  7. Waiting for more info. The fact that they are only talking about gaming benchmarks is… interesting.

    I mean, it shouldn’t be ~worse~ than current gen, but a cache upgrade refresh is only going to have very limited benefits, and gaming in CPU bound situations happens to be one of them. But I can see ~most~ use cases being about the same, or maybe a few percent better based on slightly better binning or clocks.

    I think this is mostly just a play to have ~something~ announced in the wake of Alder Lake and keep Intel from having all the press to themselves, since it appears Zen4 won’t quite be ready yet (although nice news on that too with PCI5 and DDR5). Not saying there’s anything wrong with that necessarily, so long as it doesn’t regress any and prices are relatively tame.

  8. It gives those of us a Rev or two behind with am4 cpus a target to upgrade to to scratch that itch so to speak. I haven’t hit any walls with my 3900x performance wise. But if I can get a 5900xt+ or whatever as the last am4 cpu why not?

  9. Wow, Nice.

    I wasn’t expecting them to move so fast on the next update after the 5xxx series.

    This is good news as it shows they have some tricks up their sleeves to respond top Intel with.

    Pat Gelsinger may have to eat his only week-old statements.

    I wonder if this is why the Zen3 Threadripper was delayed, they wanted it to jump right to the new V-Cache.

  10. I also wonder how this will compare to Intel’s Crystalwell. Crystalwell was aimed primiarly at boosting IGP performance, but the big L4 cache was shared between the IGP and CPU, so it also yielded some interesting CPU boosts.

  11. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 42472, member: 215″]
    It gives those of us a Rev or two behind with am4 cpus a target to upgrade to to scratch that itch so to speak. I haven’t hit any walls with my 3900x performance wise. But if I can get a 5900xt+ or whatever as the last am4 cpu why not?
    [/QUOTE]
    Call me when you’re ready to sell that 3900x 🙂

  12. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 42461, member: 96″]
    Waiting for more info. The fact that they are only talking about gaming benchmarks is… interesting.

    I mean, it shouldn’t be ~worse~ than current gen, but a cache upgrade refresh is only going to have very limited benefits, and gaming in CPU bound situations happens to be one of them. But I can see ~most~ use cases being about the same, or maybe a few percent better based on slightly better binning or clocks.

    I think this is mostly just a play to have ~something~ announced in the wake of Alder Lake and keep Intel from having all the press to themselves, since it appears Zen4 won’t quite be ready yet (although nice news on that too with PCI5 and DDR5). Not saying there’s anything wrong with that necessarily, so long as it doesn’t regress any and prices are relatively tame.
    [/QUOTE]

    Maybe they’re just focusing on the gaming benchmarks because that’s the one spot that Intel was still a pretty solid competitor. Ryzen always ran off and left them in productivity and other tasks and this new version should be no different. Just a guess tho.

  13. [QUOTE=”MacLeod, post: 42554, member: 261″]
    Maybe they’re just focusing on the gaming benchmarks because that’s the one spot that Intel was still a pretty solid competitor. Ryzen always ran off and left them in productivity and other tasks and this new version should be no different. Just a guess tho.
    [/QUOTE]

    That, and it also probably has to do with the market they play in.

    Even today Intel owns more of the OEM market. If you look at Dells desktop and all-in-one offerings, they have 44 Intel based models, and 6 AMD based models.

    AMD is probably more of a player in the DIY market, and unfortunately the non-gaming DIY market has mostly evaporated. Probably 95+% of those building PC’s themselves are doing so for games. It has been this way for a good 10 years.

    When I was working for the [H] I remember posting [URL=’https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/288093′]this news story about MSI[/URL] and how their CEO realized the future in PC components was in gaming, and in 2012 essentially announced that going forward MSI was a gaming company, and if you disagree, you know where the door is. That pivot essentially saved the company, and that was almost 10 years ago. PC Gaming has only become bigger and bigger since. In that news post I also ran a companion link to a business analysis that Gaming was essentially driving the entire PC market today (meaning 2017).

    It seems funny in retrospect considering how we who appreciated games were downplayed, belittled, and ostracized over the years. I remember being ashamed to admit that I played games in certain circles as recently as 15 years ago. Sometimes I still am. But gaming today is a big part of the PC market, and an overwhelmingly huge part of the individual PC component market and it makes complete sense for AMD to tout it’s gaming performance.

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