Image: EVGA

The demand for graphics cards has gotten so ridiculous that criminals are now raiding delivery trucks for GPUs. As revealed by a staff member on the manufacturer’s official forum yesterday, EVGA has lost a large and expensive shipment of NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 Series graphics cards due to a truck robbery. The truck was supposed to arrive at EVGA’s Southern California distribution center with various graphics cards ranging in price from $329.99 to $1,959.99 but never got there.

From EVGA_JacobF:

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on October 29, 2021, a shipment of EVGA GeForce RTX 30-Series Graphics Cards was stolen from a truck en route from San Francisco to our Southern California distribution center.

These graphics cards are in high demand and each has an estimated retail value starting at $329.99 up to $1959.99 MSRP.

PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that under state and Federal law:

  • It is a criminal and civil offense to “buy or receive” property that has been stolen. Cal. Penal Code section 496(a).
  • It is also a criminal and civil offense to “conceal, sell, withhold, or aid in concealing selling or withholding” any such property.

PLEASE TAKE FURTHER notice that:

  • If you are able to successfully register your product and see it under My Products, then your product is NOT affected by this notice, you can also check the serial number at the EVGA Warranty Check page to see if it is affected.
  • EVGA will NOT REGISTER or HONOR ANY WARRANTY or UPGRADE claims on these products.

If you have or receive any information relating to these products, please share that with us at stopRTX30theft@evga.com.

We appreciate your attention to this issue.

Thank you,
EVGA Management

The retail values given by EVGA suggest that the stolen shipment includes premium graphics cards such as the GeForce RTX 3090 FTW3 ULTRA HYDRO COPPER GAMING. None of the KINGPIN cards, which cost over $2,000, appear to have been on the truck.

Source: EVGA

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14 Comments

  1. I suspect it is an internal job, either EVGA or the carrier.

    Who else would know which truck contained this material?

  2. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 43421, member: 203″]
    I suspect it is an internal job, either EVGA or the carrier.

    Who else would know which truck contained this material?
    [/QUOTE]

    Why did they need to know? Maybe it’s just a coincidence, opportunity arose and they went for it.

  3. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 43421, member: 203″]
    I suspect it is an internal job, either EVGA or the carrier.

    Who else would know which truck contained this material?
    [/QUOTE]
    They steal trucks full of anything out here. Pistachio theft is a thing, believe it or not.

    That said, I also wouldn’t be surprised to hear it’s an inside job either.

  4. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 43426, member: 96″]
    They steal trucks full of anything out here. Pistachio theft is a thing, believe it or not.

    That said, I also wouldn’t be surprised to hear it’s an inside job either.
    [/QUOTE]
    Pistachios are expensive.

    [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 43429, member: 1298″]
    We live in a crazy world, where a shipment of GPUs is worth more than an armored truck.
    [/QUOTE]
    Pretty sure GPUs aren’t being transported by armored trucks.

    Manufacturers of high value items should have unique identifiers for these products so that when stuff like this happens they can trace it. Who am I kidding, that would be sensible.

  5. [QUOTE=”Nanobot, post: 43433, member: 73″]
    Pretty sure GPUs aren’t being transported by armored trucks.
    [/QUOTE]
    Who said they were? I meant that a shipment of gpus is more expensive than the contents of a money hauling armored truck.

  6. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 43438, member: 1298″]
    Who said they were? I meant that a shipment of gpus is more expensive than the contents of a money hauling armored truck.
    [/QUOTE]
    Sry, misread that.

  7. According to EVGA, they know every single serial # that was on that truck. They are not offering any warranty support, or upgrade credit for these stolen GPUs. You will find out that you have a stolen card once you register it with EVGA. They should have posted all the serial #’s to the public, so that an informed buyer can tell if they’re buying something stolen, and to assist with the police investigation when the seller gets reported for selling stolen goods.

  8. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 43450, member: 52″]
    According to EVGA, they know every single serial # that was on that truck. They are not offering any warranty support, or upgrade credit for these stolen GPUs. You will find out that you have a stolen card once you register it with EVGA. They should have posted all the serial #’s to the public, so that an informed buyer can tell if they’re buying something stolen, and to assist with the police investigation when the seller gets reported for selling stolen goods.
    [/QUOTE]
    Might still be considered priviledged and have something to do with financial reporting, since they will have to write all those off and they haven’t released make/models.

  9. Shouldn’t be surprised but I didn’t see this coming

    [URL unfurl=”true”]https://videocardz.com/newz/stolen-evga-geforce-rtx-30-cards-reportedly-discovered-in-a-vietnamese-store[/URL]

  10. It’s a lot easier to hijack a freight truck than an armored car for sure.

    Doesn’t say how big the shipment was, but if there were 100 high end cards in there, could still be a big haul.

    EVGA really should list all the serial numbers publically. While I’m not shopping for high end cards on ebay, I’m sure some people do. And it would be nice to know if what you’re buying is hot or not.

  11. [QUOTE=”Burticus, post: 46492, member: 297″]
    It’s a lot easier to hijack a freight truck than an armored car for sure.

    Doesn’t say how big the shipment was, but if there were 100 high end cards in there, could still be a big haul.

    EVGA really should list all the serial numbers publically. While I’m not shopping for high end cards on ebay, I’m sure some people do. And it would be nice to know if what you’re buying is hot or not.
    [/QUOTE]
    Did someone say [URL=’https://web.archive.org/web/20040609091937/http://www.hotornot.com:80/’]Hot or Not[/URL]?

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