Image: Netgear

The first products to feature the next generation of wireless technology, Wi-Fi 7, will be released in 2023.

Semiconductor company MediaTek shared that date in a press release published today that elaborates on the company’s world’s first live demo of Wi-Fi 7 (IEEE 802.11be) technology, which is designed to show key customers and industry collaborators that the new wireless standard is capable of hitting the speeds advertised by the Wi-Fi Alliance. According to that group, Wi-Fi 7 features a maximum throughput of at least 30 Gbps.

“The rollout of Wi-Fi 7 will mark the first time that Wi-Fi can be a true wireline/Ethernet replacement for super high-bandwidth applications,” said Alan Hsu, corporate vice president and general manager of the Intelligent Connectivity business at MediaTek. “MediaTek’s Wi-Fi 7 technology will be the backbone of home, office and industrial networks and provide seamless connectivity for everything from multi-player AR/VR applications to cloud gaming and 4K calls to 8K streaming and beyond.”

“Faster broadband Internet access and more demanding applications such as higher resolution video streaming and VR gaming are driving demand for Wi-Fi 6, Wi-Fi 6E, and soon Wi-Fi 7,” said Mario Morales, group vice president, Semiconductors at IDC. “Wi-Fi 7’s advances in channel width, QAM, and new features such as multi-link operation (MLO) will make Wi-Fi 7 very attractive for devices including flagship smartphones, PCs, consumer devices and vertical industries like retail and industrial; as service providers begin to deploy a wider spectrum of hotspots across these market segments.”

“Today’s consumers want an always-connected, reliable and fast Wi-Fi connection for many applications such as video calls, 4K/8K TV entertainment, real-time gaming, and others,” said Moon Ho Lee, president at Korea Mercury. “MediaTek’s Wi-Fi 7 technology can fulfill the current need for all the applications consumers enjoy today and also open the door for future AR/VR applications which we can’t even imagine today.”

In addition to the increased speeds, Wi-Fi 7 will improve upon its predecessors with reduced latency/jitter, additional bands, up to 320 MHz channel sizes, and 4096-QAM modulation. Naturally, it will be backward compatible with older-generation devices.

Source: MediaTek

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39 Comments

  1. Honestly, I’m still on 802.11ac, and haven’t felt a need to make any changes.

    I don’t really do any heavy lifting over WiFi. All of that is wired.

    Oh, and this is where I reiterate how much the new naming scheme annoys me. I much prefer the old IEEE chapter reference method.

  2. Main thing that newer technologies are helping with – despite all the ‘faster than wired ethernet!’ marketing hype – is better spectrum utilization to further limit congestion.

    And I’m good with the naming scheme so long as it’s backed up by the associated IEEE specification that can be used to hold these manufacturers accountable when they inevitably try to ship something that falls short.

  3. I just got an email from Verizon telling me WiFi is dead because 5G is now here!

    Will be interesting to see how these two start to really compete with each other

  4. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 47174, member: 96″]
    Will be interesting to see how these two start to really compete with each other
    [/QUOTE]
    I’d like to see the radios themselves converge – i.e., instead of having cellular, WiFi, Bluetooth, and whatever close-range high-bandwidth thing we wind up with all as separate radios, just have radios that can do all of them simultaneously, switching connections between bands and antennas as necessary.

    Bit forward thinking to be sure, but software-defined radios are already a thing.

  5. WiFi is fine for tablets, phones and such in our home. As mentioned above, heavy traffic is wired here.
    It’s nice we have new tumor creators coming out soon.

  6. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 47174, member: 96″]
    I just got an email from Verizon telling me WiFi is dead because 5G is now here!

    Will be interesting to see how these two start to really compete with each other
    [/QUOTE]

    Of course they want all of your devices to connect via 5G directly. That way they can better harvest your internet history to track you and sell for ad purposes :p

    It means the difference between getting an entire household worth of TLD’s all mixed together, and getting them by device so you can figure out who is who!

  7. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 47184, member: 203″]
    Of course they want all of your devices to connect via 5G directly. That way they can better harvest your internet history to track you and sell for ad purposes :p

    It means the difference between getting an entire household worth of TLD’s all mixed together, and getting them by device so you can figure out who is who!
    [/QUOTE]
    Wasn’t IPv6 supposed to do that as well? Whatever happened to that anyway

  8. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 47188, member: 96″]
    Wasn’t IPv6 supposed to do that as well? Whatever happened to that anyway
    [/QUOTE]

    It’s slowly being rolled out.

    Most mobile internet is already all IPV6.

    Many home internet providers have also started to make IPV6 available.

    And yes, part of the motivation of IPV6 (in addition to simply dealing with address space exhaustion) is to provide enough address space that NAT becomes obsolete, because there is enough address space that any device can connect to any other device 1:1.

    The security and tracking aspects of this have been raised, and the IETF responded by including measures that allow you to rotate IP addresses frequently. Because there are so many ip addresses, the envisioned setting is that each subscriber would get a large block of block of addresses. The most common size is a /64 or /56 block.

    If I have understood it properly:

    A /64 block means the first 64 bits of the address are fixed, meaning the remaining 64 (out of 128bits in total) are yours to use, so you get 64bits or 2^64 or 1.8×10^19 addresses just to yourself.

    A /56 block then means the first 56 bits of the address are fixed, and you get 72bits to yourself, so 2^72, or 4.7×10^21 addresses to yourself.

    So, the way they reduce tracking per device is to have the DHCP rotate the addresses on the device on a regular basis. How often this occurs is configurable.

    This certainly helps a little, but it is far from perfect.

    As much as it makes the authors of the IPV6 standard foam at the mouth, I think I intend to use NAT66, in other words IPV6 to IPV6 network translation, similar to how your router today does NAT44, or IPV4 to IPV4 address translation.

    IPV6 evangelists HATE this, as they see the whole purpose of IPV6 as getting rid of NAT once and for all, but IMHO it makes the most sense to me for my network.

    I’d much rather have everything enter and exit my local network on one mixed garbled IP address (and tunnel that IP address through a anonymous VPN service)

    I think I read somewhere that Verizon is starting to roll out IPV6 on FiOS by now, but I am not sure if it has hit my area yet.

    I’ll probably put off transitioning my network to IPV6 for as long as possible. Right now I ahve it set up and it works. I ahve no need to change anyhting, until the day I start not being able to access sites because they have moved to IPV6, but I feel like that is quite a long ways away.

  9. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 47188, member: 96″]
    Wasn’t IPv6 supposed to do that as well? Whatever happened to that anyway
    [/QUOTE]
    Problem is ipv6 is a jumbled mess to figure out. With the humber of sections and the number of possible combinations in each section.. its just hard to mentally understand. It so much easier to know your ip is 10.0.27.234 than whatever the fudge ipv6 address is. And heaven forbid you want to assign static addresses thst are easily understood.

  10. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 47190, member: 215″]
    Problem is ipv6 is a jumbled mess to figure out. With the humber of sections and the number of possible combinations in each section.. its just hard to mentally understand. It so much easier to know your ip is 10.0.27.234 than whatever the fudge ipv6 address is. And heaven forbid you want to assign static addresses thst are easily understood.
    [/QUOTE]
    I haven’t seen anything use it yet for actual network traffic, other than some random stuff will fail (like printer discovery) if you try to disable it.

  11. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 47190, member: 215″]
    Problem is ipv6 is a jumbled mess to figure out. With the humber of sections and the number of possible combinations in each section.. its just hard to mentally understand. It so much easier to know your ip is 10.0.27.234 than whatever the fudge ipv6 address is. And heaven forbid you want to assign static addresses thst are easily understood.
    [/QUOTE]

    I agree. That’s what you get when computer scientists develop anything.

    They failed to understand just how unnatural anything hexadecimal is and how unnatural their multi-colon based shortcut structure is to just confuse things even further.

    Add to that they also are under the impression that everyone should be using DNS for everything, being willfully blind to the vast number of small local networks that are managed by simy memorizing IPV4 addresses, something that is almost impossible with IPV6 addresses.

    IPV6 is a huge fail. They were so traumatized by IPV4 address exhaustion that they went total overkill with an 128bit address space no one asked for. We don’t need enough IP addresses for every atom on the planet. Not now, not ever.

    They should have just kept it simple. Added another octet to IPV4 making it 40 bit and called it a day. The 1.099 trillion addresses that would have resulted in would have been more than adequate for a hundred years to come, and would have been WAY more human readable and usable than the disaster IPV6 became. They could even have reserved the first octet for an area code or country code or something like that, allowing it to be voluntarily omitted for domestic addressing, making even fewer digits used, and things easier to remember.

    I wish we could just throw it out and start over.

  12. My understanding is that IPv6 is intended to allow for the ‘addressing’ of everything, and without NAT –

    …and the security side of my brain is screeching in terror at the idea. For now, I disable it for all personal stuff, even though it’s fully routable through Spectrum.

    I’ll go so far as to say that I [I]like[/I] the idea of NATs – the inherent security of putting a whole network layer that has to process stuff by design is comforting.

  13. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 47210, member: 1367″]
    My understanding is that IPv6 is intended to allow for the ‘addressing’ of everything, and without NAT –

    …and the security side of my brain is screeching in terror at the idea. For now, I disable it for all personal stuff, even though it’s fully routable through Spectrum.

    I’ll go so far as to say that I [I]like[/I] the idea of NATs – the inherent security of putting a whole network layer that has to process stuff by design is comforting.
    [/QUOTE]

    The counter-argument to that is that just because you are giving up NAT, doesn’t mean that you don’t have a firewall between your LAN and your WAN just like you did before, that by default rejects incoming connections (unless you open them up on a per port basis).

    That and NAT really isn’t a security measure anyway. At least not a very good one.

    Either way, I feel you, I like having my little network with a single interface to the rest of the world

  14. We’d say, “security through obscurity isn’t security… but it still helps”.

    NAT means that there must be a translator between the networks – it’s not going to stop a determined attacker, it just stops short of posting a public map 😉

  15. Hmm.. the more I think about it.

    NAT is nice because it’s free to use, and it is nice just having one address to remember to get back to all your devices. You need to set up port forwarding and recall specific ports, or tunnel in via a VPN, but I think that’s easier than recalling entire addresses (especially v6). And being a single interface, it’s easier to lock down

    But I can see the computer scientists’ point: DNS is a lot more flexible, and you can make names as memorable as you want, and it solves the “holy shit how do you remember all this hexadecimal mess”. But registration isn’t free, and it requires a DNS service running someplace, and DNS itself can be a vector for attack.

    Neither is perfect, and since the benefits don’t clearly outweigh the negatives, so I stick with the devil I know. And that’s probably why IPv4 hasn’t died out.

  16. I swear that Netgear image looks like the engineers were paying a bit too much attention to those old Maxi-pads “It has wings” ads from a while back.

  17. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 47174, member: 96″]
    I just got an email from Verizon telling me WiFi is dead because 5G is now here!
    [/QUOTE]
    Yep and meanwhile the news on TV has been going off all week about the Airlines wanting 5G use restricted, at least until further testing is done. For the last year or so where we live its been a real crapshoot with them and AT&T replacing the transmitters in their towers. One day you got bars, the next no so much.

  18. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 47233, member: 87″]
    I swear that Netgear image looks like the engineers were paying a bit too much attention to those old Maxi-pads “It has wings” ads from a while back.
    [/QUOTE]

    You know, consumer routers keep getting more extravagant looking, in some sort of attempt to make them LOOK like they perform better.

    You know, stupid shit like the dead upside down spider from Asus:

    [ATTACH type=”full” width=”461px”]1426[/ATTACH]

    Then they all get outperformed by something that looks like this, and is designed to blend in with an office ceiling panel.

    [ATTACH type=”full”]1425[/ATTACH]

    That’s how you know it’s all for show, and has no functional value at all.

    It just serves to try to get people to overpay for the “extreme gamer” aesthetic.

    I’m surprised they don’t put disco RGB LED’s on them.

  19. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 47240, member: 52″]
    I heard RGB improves WiFi signal attenuation by 10-15%!
    [/QUOTE]
    Sound quality is improved, too.

  20. [QUOTE=”Nanobot, post: 47245, member: 73″]
    Sound quality is improved, too.
    [/QUOTE]

    Not to mention K/D ratio!

  21. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 47238, member: 203″]
    I’m surprised they don’t put disco RGB LED’s on them.
    [/QUOTE]
    Well… actually…
    [ATTACH type=”full”]1427[/ATTACH]
    I have one of these… works fine… but yes it has the disco lights. 😉

  22. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 47240, member: 52″]
    I heard RGB improves WiFi signal attenuation by 10-15%!
    [/QUOTE]
    I heard it gets even better when you add an NFT to the purchase.

  23. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 47254, member: 215″]
    Well… actually…
    [ATTACH type=”full” alt=”1642711423032.png”]1427[/ATTACH]
    I have one of these… works fine… but yes it has the disco lights. 😉
    [/QUOTE]
    You know that reminds me. It could be an interesting niche market if they used iconic shapes from tv/movies. I mean like, the original Cylon head with the light or KITT from the original Knightrider.

  24. Guess I’ll keep rocking my Unifi for a while longer. I don’t really see the need for such high bandwidth wireless in the home, or even in a business, for general purpose device use.

  25. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 47313, member: 4″]
    Guess I’ll keep rocking my Unifi for a while longer. I don’t really see the need for such high bandwidth wireless in the home, or even in a business, for general purpose device use.
    [/QUOTE]

    Yeah, as has been mentioned earlier in the thread, the biggest use case is probably for very dense office areas or public places, where you have a very large number of devices in a very compact space. Then presumably one of these AP’s can serve a greater number of users/devices by sharing the greater amount of bandwidth.

    Still, wireless networking will always play second fiddle to the real wired stuff to me.

  26. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 47329, member: 203″]
    Yeah, as has been mentioned earlier in the thread, the biggest use case is probably for very dense office areas or public places, where you have a very large number of devices in a very compact space. Then presumably one of these AP’s can serve a greater number of users/devices by sharing the greater amount of bandwidth.

    [/QUOTE]
    Yep, that’s what I did in Dec 2020 at our office that has roughly 10-20+ mobile devices connected to it at anytime using video apps. I thought about a mesh but decided to just hit it with one big hammer instead with a model that has large coverage, bandwidth, and decent security features. I can’t remember what it is off the top of my head but it is one of these kinds of things. It’s worked out great.

  27. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 47338, member: 87″]
    Yep, that’s what I did in Dec 2020 at our office that has roughly 10-20+ mobile devices connected to it at anytime using video apps. I thought about a mesh but decided to just hit it with one big hammer instead with a model that has large coverage, bandwidth, and decent security features. I can’t remember what it is off the top of my head but it is one of these kinds of things. It’s worked out great.
    [/QUOTE]
    Where I work I have to provide WiFi for over 250-300 people at a time during our busiest times. UniFi HD’s have worked great for them.

  28. [QUOTE=”Space_Ranger, post: 47350, member: 52″]
    Where I work I have to provide WiFi for over 250-300 people at a time during our busiest times. UniFi HD’s have worked great for them.
    [/QUOTE]
    For a long time I was a proponent of the Cisco Aironet and Catalyst access points. But, for the money, it’s really hard to beat Unifi.

  29. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 47354, member: 4″]
    But, for the money, it’s really hard to beat Unifi.
    [/QUOTE]
    Only real annoyance is the need to run the controller. I run it on a Pi 4 alongside pihole, but in more commercial installations you’d want something a bit more robust, I’d imagine.

  30. [QUOTE=”LazyGamer, post: 47356, member: 1367″]
    Only real annoyance is the need to run the controller. I run it on a Pi 4 alongside pihole, but in more commercial installations you’d want something a bit more robust, I’d imagine.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah.. I’ve got an OLD Dell PowerEdge 2950 running pfSense, the controller, and a couple of VMs for the public wifi network.

  31. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 47354, member: 4″]
    But, for the money, it’s really hard to beat Unifi.
    [/QUOTE]

    It is. I’ve been very disappointed in the direction they are going through.

    I think my current Unifi AP’s are probably my last. I’ve been planning on swapping them out for some time, possibly for Ruckus units, but haven’t gotten around to it yet.

  32. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 47360, member: 203″]
    It is. I’ve been very disappointed in the direction they are going through.

    I think my current Unifi AP’s are probably my last. I’ve been planning on swapping them out for some time, possibly for Ruckus units, but haven’t gotten around to it yet.
    [/QUOTE]
    I can’t find a reason for me to swap my AP-AC-LR’s. They both have been going strong for 6 years, never need maintenance. Every once in a blue moon when I actually start the controller I’ll update their firmware’s. The controller doesn’t have to be running. Really ever, unless you are pushing updates or want remote management capabilities.

    If there was some ground breaking reason to upgrade I’d do it.

  33. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 47366, member: 4″]
    If there was some ground breaking reason to upgrade I’d do it.
    [/QUOTE]
    I’m looking forward to 6GHz support and WPA3, someday.

    I’ll upgrade when I can get something about the level of my AC Pro.

  34. I will say this for the Asus routers. You get a free sub to Ai-Protect network signature based scanning. Is it the best thing out there… No. Is it better than nothing… YES. And it’s no additional cost and hasn’t impacted my latency or speed on my gigabit connection either.

  35. [QUOTE=”Zarathustra, post: 47189, member: 203″]

    A /64 block means the first 64 bits of the address are fixed, meaning the remaining 64 (out of 128bits in total) are yours to use, so you get 64bits or 2^64 or 1.8×10^19 addresses just to yourself.

    A /56 block then means the first 56 bits of the address are fixed, and you get 72bits to yourself, so 2^72, or 4.7×10^21 addresses to yourself.

    So, the way they reduce tracking per device is to have the DHCP rotate the addresses on the device on a regular basis. How often this occurs is configurable.
    [/QUOTE]

    and what is stopping them from associating the first 64 (or 56) bits of a block to you/your family/household/whatever?

    Them being “the trackers”

  36. [QUOTE=”Grimlakin, post: 47368, member: 215″]
    I will say this for the Asus routers. You get a free sub to Ai-Protect network signature based scanning. Is it the best thing out there… No. Is it better than nothing… YES. And it’s no additional cost and hasn’t impacted my latency or speed on my gigabit connection either.
    [/QUOTE]
    Or just get a real stateful firewall that drops all inbound traffic unless specific rules are created for it. UPNP is garbage, and third party control over it isn’t much better.

    That’s the cisco engineer in me talking.

  37. [QUOTE=”Riccochet, post: 47366, member: 4″]
    an’t find a reason for me to swap my AP-AC-LR’s. They both have been going strong for 6 years, never need maintenance. Every once in a blue moon when I actually start the controller I’ll update their firmware’s. The controller doesn’t have to be running. Really ever, unless you are pushing updates or want remote management capabilities.

    If there was some ground breaking reason to upgrade I’d do it.
    [/QUOTE]

    Eventually they will end support and stop patching them, like they did with my old green ring b/g/n model years ago.

  38. [QUOTE=”LeRoy_Blanchard, post: 47369, member: 137″]
    and what is stopping them from associating the first 64 (or 56) bits of a block to you/your family/household/whatever?

    Them being “the trackers”
    [/QUOTE]
    Exactly. That’s why it is of limited usefulness, but it is on the same level of associating your NATed public IP to your family.

    Currently I run all of my LAN traffic through a VPN. I’m not entirely sure how that works with IPV6.

    I guess you’d have to use a NAT66 to accomplish this, otherwise you’d need one VPN connection per LAN IP address.

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