Image: Tesla

Did you happen to buy a new Tesla this past week? Consider yourself lucky in the savings department, as the company has implemented substantial price increases throughout its entire range of EVs. They include the entry-level Model 3, which now costs $2,000 more, making $46,990 the minimum price that someone has to pay to get into the Tesla family, and the Model X, the standard version of which now includes a $10,000 premium. Tesla CEO Elon Musk hinted at the price increases over the weekend, tweeting that Tesla and SpaceX are facing “significant recent inflation pressure.”

  • Model 3 Rear-Wheel-Drive: $46,990 (+$2,000)
  • Model 3 Dual Motor All-Wheel Drive: $54,500 (+$2,500)
  • Model 3 Performance: $61,990 (+$3,000)
  • Model Y Long Range: $62,990 (+$2,000)
  • Model Y Performance: $67,990 (+$3,000)
  • Model S: $99,990 (+$5,000)
  • Model S Plaid: $135,990 (+$5,000)
  • Model X: $114,990 (+$10,000)
  • Model X Plaid: $138,990 (+$12,500)

Tesla increases prices throughout whole lineup, its cheapest electric car now starts at $47,000 (Electrek)

  • Things started calm in 2022, but last week Tesla implemented its first price increase of the year, charging $1,000 extra for all of the vehicles equipped with long-range battery packs. Now this new price update includes more significant price increases.
  • All those price increases throughout the lineup apply only to new orders being placed today and going forward. For most versions, Tesla is guiding a delivery timeline of at least a few months – up to the end of the year for the cheapest versions.
  • As we reported last week, Tesla is seeing a massive surge in orders recently that appears to be linked to the increased interest in electric cars due to the surge in gas prices.

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7 comments

  1. This is just pushing EV adoption out further and further. With new more eco friendly sedans coming that have better range and faster refill though perhaps more costly depending on the region...

    I guess inflation is just inflation and you need to stay profitable. If the market will bare the higher cost charge it.

    I live in texas. Driving an hour to get somewhere is not out of the usual. 100 miles in a day is not unusual. (if driving.) So I don't see EV's being the huge cost differntiator that they claim especially with battery life being an issue.

    Of course my car is near 10 years old with almost 150 K on it. I have a feeling I'd be looking at a healthy capacity loss on my Tesla if I'd had one as long and driven as much.
  2. This is just pushing EV adoption out further and further. With new more eco friendly sedans coming that have better range and faster refill though perhaps more costly depending on the region...

    I guess inflation is just inflation and you need to stay profitable. If the market will bare the higher cost charge it.

    I live in texas. Driving an hour to get somewhere is not out of the usual. 100 miles in a day is not unusual. (if driving.) So I don't see EV's being the huge cost differntiator that they claim especially with battery life being an issue.

    Of course my car is near 10 years old with almost 150 K on it. I have a feeling I'd be looking at a healthy capacity loss on my Tesla if I'd had one as long and driven as much.

    You won't need those miles anyways. You're better off sitting around a rest stop waiting for your car to charge.

    At least that's what Tesla owners say.
  3. I guess inflation is just inflation and you need to stay profitable. If the market will bare the higher cost charge it.
    Yup. It's ridiculous. Pick anything and the cost is going nuts or the supply is out of whack, for "reasons".
  4. You won't need those miles anyways. You're better off sitting around a rest stop waiting for your car to charge.

    At least that's what Tesla owners say.
    With 300+ miles per charge on a Tesla, he could drive that 100 miles per day and still stay in the 50-80% charge Sweet spot for battery longevity just by charging at home. Slap some Solar panels on the roof and he gets to save all the fuel costs associated with 100 miles per day too. Of course, at 100 miles per day, his 150k miles on a 10 year old car doesn’t line up, but let’s not focus on that for the moment.
  5. I don't understand why they are keep on talking about the mass adoption of EVs, even in the land of promise it is expensive.

    Here halfway between the first and the third world the average person can't even afford a budget ice sedan. A new one, I mean. The median age of private cars is somewhere around 15 years, and it keeps getting older every year. It was 10 years in 2007. Which means people are getting poorer, or cars are becoming more expensive. One or the other.

    Manufacturers only really started the push of EVs in the 2020s, which means mass adoption can happen at the earliest by 2035.
  6. I don't understand why they are keep on talking about the mass adoption of EVs, even in the land of promise it is expensive.

    Here halfway between the first and the third world the average person can't even afford a budget ice sedan. A new one, I mean. The median age of private cars is somewhere around 15 years, and it keeps getting older every year. It was 10 years in 2007. Which means people are getting poorer, or cars are becoming more expensive. One or the other.

    Manufacturers only really started the push of EVs in the 2020s, which means mass adoption can happen at the earliest by 2035.

    The issue is the cost of living the cost of the vehicle and the stagnation of income. Not to mention the great unemployment boom. Many factors lead into this.

    With 300+ miles per charge on a Tesla, he could drive that 100 miles per day and still stay in the 50-80% charge Sweet spot for battery longevity just by charging at home. Slap some Solar panels on the roof and he gets to save all the fuel costs associated with 100 miles per day too. Of course, at 100 miles per day, his 150k miles on a 10 year old car doesn’t line up, but let’s not focus on that for the moment.

    Yes I could but that's not all I drive. And Covid has really slowed down the amount I drive as I can work from home most of the time currently.

    Yet as a single income paying for two cars, a house, and all associated expenses of a a significant other with regular high doctors bills. The idea of a new car let alone a new expense EV is too high. Not to mention the concept of 'just throwing some solar panels on' is clearly not in my mind. I priced those out a few years ago at 40k. Now unless they have come down a LOT I won't be just 'throwing' those on either.

    So no I've not driven 365 thousand miles. Nor have I driven 260 thousand miles. (100 miles a day 5 day working week.) I have the good fortune to be able to work from home more often. As of late near 100% of the time. (late being since march 2020.)

    So yes the 'math' might not work for you. But it works for me.

    Oh and I got my car used too... so it had 33k miles on it to start in 2015 when I bought it.

    I hope that makes things more understandable.

    Now talk to me again about the 22k battery replacement issue.

    Also note I'm not AGAINST getting one. Just doesn't work for my use case currently.

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