Image: Polyphony Digital

Is Gran Turismo finished? That’s doubtful based on the level of critical acclaim that the franchise has won over the years, but the controversy that its latest installment has attracted certainly isn’t doing the series any favors, as indicated by the latest numbers on Metacritic derived from players who have sounded off regarding Gran Turismo 7’s microtransactions and other deficiencies.

Gran Turismo 7 currently has a shockingly low user score of 2.2/10 on Metacritic, the worst one yet for a game from PlayStation Studios, Sony Interactive Entertainment, SCEA, or SCEJ on the decades-old review aggregation site. While the game has a strong Metascore of 87 from critics on PlayStation 5, users are evidently in total disagreement, having blasted Gran Turismo 7 with reviews that drag the title below previous disappointments such as World of Warriors (2.9) and NBA 10 The Inside (3.0).

Image: Metacritic

Adding to the controversy, Gran Turismo 7 was offline for over 24 hours between March 17 and 18 last week, rendering it nearly unplayable due to the amount of content that requires an internet connection to access. Gran Turismo 7 producer Kazunori Yamauchi has promised in a new blog post that additional content, race events, and features will be introduced to improve the game.

“In GT7 I would like to have users enjoy lots of cars and races even without microtransactions,” Yamauchi wrote. “At the same time the pricing of cars is an important element that conveys their value and rarity, so I do think it’s important for it to be linked with the real world prices. I want to make GT7 a game in which you can enjoy a variety of cars lots of different ways, and if possible would like to try to avoid a situation where a player must mechanically keep replaying certain events over and over again.”

“We will in time let you know the update plans for additional content, additional race events and additional features that will constructively resolve this,” he added. “It pains me that I can’t explain the details regarding this at this moment, but we plan on continuing to revise GT7 so that as many players as possible can enjoy the game. We would really appreciate it if everyone could watch over the growth of Gran Turismo 7 from a somewhat longer term point of view.”

Gran Turismo 7 now has Sony’s lowest user score ever on Metacritic (VGC) (via Eurogamer)

Gran Turismo 7 now has Sony’s lowest user score ever on review aggregation site Metacritic, following recent downtime and criticism of the game’s microtransactions.

At the time of publishing, the PS4 and PS5 racer has a user score of 2.5/10, which appears to put it below every game in Metacritic’s 27-years of tracked games from PlayStation Studios, Sony Interactive Entertainment, SCEA, SCEE and SCEJ.

The vast majority of GT7’s user reviews were posted on or after March 17, when developer Polyphony Digital released a controversial patch reducing payouts from the game’s races, thus making it harder to unlock new cars without spending on microtransactions.

GT7 was also offline for more than 24 hours between the 17th and 18th, which made it nearly unplayable due to the significant amount of content it requires an internet connection to access.

Even before the latest patch, VGC reported that some of Gran Turismo 7’s cars cost as much as eight times what they did on Gran Turismo Sport, if purchased using real money.

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4 comments

  1. Gran Turismo 7 was offline for over 24 hours
    Actually it was down for over 36 hours in the end.

    Kaz is completely out of touch with reality at this point. He is trying to imitate the real world scarcity of cars in the game. Well, duh that's exactly why we want to drive them in a videogame , because they are unattainable IRL. Making them unattainable in game as well defeats the purpose of the game.

    I'm willing to believe the argument that the intent was not to push people towards microtransactions, because if somebody wants to buy the newly unlocked McLaren F1 in the game, they'd have to pay around $200 for it in real world money. I don't think he reasonably expected anyone to pay that much.

    But the microtransactions and low payouts of the game are not even half of the issues. There are other things that irk people who wanted a good old GT a'la 1-2-3-4-5-6,.

    First that the campaign is completely linear and very short, there is no way to get off the beaten path. If someone plays all day they can beat the whole campaign in a 3-4 days. There is a serious lack of content here. GT Sport which is not even supposed to be a single player game, now has more single player content than GT7, and more in tune with what people expect from Gran Turismo too.

    And the wonky physics. Something just doesn't add up with the game's physics, it not just calculated PP (performance points) incorrectly, but the cars behave very oddly too. They are way too twitchy, and tail happy, and seem to have no grip at all. Some aspects are outright defying physics. Like the fact that cars spin easier in higher gear, when the engine is not in the power band, than when it is in the peak power band.

    Nerfing race payouts even further was the straw that broke the horse's back. Without doing that the game would probably still be sitting around 6 on metacritic, which of course is far from great for such an iconic first party title, but still easier to explain than 2.2.
  2. Yea they shot themselves in the foot on this one. It is a self inflicted wound 100% if they just made the cars hard to obtain in game with no out of game option that would have been enough.
  3. if they just made the cars hard to obtain in game with no out of game option that would have been enough.
    No, it would not have, the game would still suck. I don't think they realistically thought anybody would pay $200 for an in-game car. They just wanted to make them unobtanium for the sake of it.
  4. No, it would not have, the game would still suck. I don't think they realistically thought anybody would pay $200 for an in-game car. They just wanted to make them unobtanium for the sake of it.
    There are idiots out there that spend hundreds to thousands on skins for Fortnite and PUBG. There are idiots that will spend $200 for an in game car.

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