Image: Apple

Apple has implemented new App Store guidelines that may result in the removal of apps or games that haven’t been updated in two years. One of the first potential victims of the new ruleset is Protopop Games, whose free title, Motivoto, is in danger of being dropped from the App Store for going years without an update. The developer has claimed that Apple’s new guidelines are unfair to indie devs.

“This is not cool,” the developer tweeted in response to an email warning him that his game will be removed from the App Store unless an update is submitted within 30 days. “Console games from 2000 are still available for sale. This is an unfair barrier to indie devs.”

“I’m sitting here on a Friday night, working myself to [the] bone after my day job, trying my best to scrape a living from my indie games, trying to keep up with Apple, Google, Unity, Xcode, MacOS changes that happen so fast my head spins while performing worse on older devices,” he added.

Apple says apps that haven’t been updated in two years will be “removed from sale” (Eurogamer)

The change comes as part of Apple’s App Store improvement scheme which aims to make the online shop easier to use and ensure customers “find great apps that fit their needs” that are compatible with newer iOS devices.

Apple confirms that the changes affects all applications, not just games, and should Apple staff encounter any issues with apps on the store, they’ll get in touch with the developers.

As Apple explained in its email to developers, even if a favourite app or game of yours is removed from the store, you should not encounter any issues using it, including microtransactions.

A support page relating to Apple’s new App Store Improvements can be found here. The company has clarified that it has set up new rules to ensure that apps on the App Store are functional and up-to-date, but apps that are removed will still remain fully functional for current users.

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7 comments

  1. Makes sense to me.

    From what I understand - if you own this stuff, you can still get it. It just won't show as available for sale any longer. It wouldn't take much to keep an app "updated" if a Dev wants to keep it on the storefront - 2 years is a long time, and you only need to bump it with any random change at all - could just be updating the copyright year for all that it matters.
  2. Makes sense to me.

    From what I understand - if you own this stuff, you can still get it. It just won't show as available for sale any longer. It wouldn't take much to keep an app "updated" if a Dev wants to keep it on the storefront - 2 years is a long time, and you only need to bump it with any random change at all - could just be updating the copyright year for all that it matters.
    as long as it is still selling, otherwise it's going to cost more then bring in, apple does not check your apps for free from what I heard.
  3. as long as it is still selling, otherwise it's going to cost more then bring in, apple does not check your apps for free from what I heard.
    Actually it doesn't cost anything. You pay for your developer license / certificate ($99 US/year, free for education) - but apart from that, there is no cost per app, and no cost per update. That's part of what that 30% take pays for. And if your app is free - there is no posting fee.
  4. I could see vendors updating the APP with 'security reviewed date of xx/xx/xxxx'. It would feel good to end users and keep Apple happy at the same time and possibly bump them up in the charts too.
  5. Microsoft: If it ain't broke, fix it until it is.
    Microsoft's motto should be:

    Users: We like that feature and use it often!
    Microsoft: Take it apart, hide it's functions, make it a pain to access, until they no longer use it! Then remove it due to lack of demand.

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