Image: GeIL

GeIL has shared a press release detailing its new EVO V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory, the world’s first DDR5 memory to feature active cooling in the form of dual RGB fans to help tame high temperatures. The unique dual-fan cooling heatshield can provide approximately 45% more thermal dissipation than traditional designs, the company claims. Available in frequencies from 4800 MHz to 6600 MHz at 1.10 V to 1.35 V and in capacities of 32 GB and 64 GB, GeIL’s new EVO V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory will reach retailers beginning in July in titanium gray and glacier white color themes.

“Gamers and Computer enthusiasts have expected more from GeIL to improve their gaming experience, and our answer is the EVO V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory,” said Jennifer Huang, VP of GeIL Memory. “The EVO V has established a new standard in heat shield design, as we have created an active dual-fan ‘FANtastic’ cooling system to keep EVO V within an ideal thermal range. The RGB illumination and fans are part of a one-piece heat spreader design that enhances overclocking performance and builds an eye-catching system.”

Image: GeIL

GeIL EVO V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory offers unparalleled memory performance and stability to meet the intensive demand of hardcore gamers and overclockers across Intel’s latest platforms. GeIL has crafted a break-through cooling solution for EVO V modules that integrates a stunning RGB light bar and two micro cooling fans into a single molded alumnum heatshield. Most importantly, the physical height of the heat spreader allows it to be compatible with most CPU coolers on the market without any mechanical interference.The heat spreader comes in two color options, titanium gray and glacier white,perfectly matching the most popular color themes of high-end motherboards and desktop PC components.Two cooling fans are located in the heatshield’s upper right and left corners and provide extra airflow to keep the modules operating in an ideal thermal range. The dual-fan cooling heatshield can provide approximately 45% more thermal dissipation than traditional.

The exceptional architecture of the DDR5 memory is based on locked/unlocked PMIC (Power Management Integrated Circuit), which can provide threshold protection, synchronized voltage monitoring, smart voltage control, and power management to achieve a more comprehensive voltage control under normal and overclocked conditions. Additionally, the on-chip ECC function enables active error correction to improve data integrity and enhance memory performance and stability.The GeIL EVO V supports the latest Intel XMP 3.0 profiles for precision and stability to auto overclocking, giving users more accessible access to customize and tweaking memory performance. Each module uses strictly sorted ICs and memory chips to offer excellent signal integrity and system performance reliability.

Source: GeIL

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15 comments

  1. Imagine that actively cooled memory sticks that will be a thing for 6 months then completely forgotten about.
    Probably. We've seen active cooling and even waterblocks on memory kits early on with a new memory generation. Primarily because of the voltages that are required to run higher end modules at their rated XMP speeds using early IC's. Then all that crap fades into obscurity as everything moves to passive heat sinks and yields, IC's, etc. all imrpove.

    It's the same old story every generation. You can pretty much apply the list below to virtually every generation from RDRAM and DDR onward.
    • Early on you get a lot of JEDEC spec memory with no heatsinks on it.
    • First generation modules rarely attain performance that beats the legacy standards cheap, yet upper end modules.
    • First generation modules that are actually faster than the outgoing standard are always extremely hard to come by and prohibitively expensive when you do find them.
    • First generation modules that do have good performance often rely on gimmicky cooling that probably isn't needed in a lot of cases so long as there is adequate airflow. This is due in part to the higher voltages generally required to clock the new RAM high enough to actually outperform the old stuff.
    • First generation XMP is a crap shoot. Compatibility is usually a massive headache on all the first generation chipsets that support the new platform. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that modules come out at a breakneck pace with latencies dropping, clocks increasing and a lot of revisions to the IC's themselves.
    Not everything in the above pattern applies to the earliest generations, but from roughly DDR2 onward, it does.
  2. Probably. We've seen active cooling and even waterblocks on memory kits early on with a new memory generation. Primarily because of the voltages that are required to run higher end modules at their rated XMP speeds using early IC's. Then all that crap fades into obscurity as everything moves to passive heat sinks and yields, IC's, etc. all imrpove.

    It's the same old story every generation. You can pretty much apply the list below to virtually every generation from RDRAM and DDR onward.
    • Early on you get a lot of JEDEC spec memory with no heatsinks on it.
    • First generation modules rarely attain performance that beats the legacy standards cheap, yet upper end modules.
    • First generation modules that are actually faster than the outgoing standard are always extremely hard to come by and prohibitively expensive when you do find them.
    • First generation modules that do have good performance often rely on gimmicky cooling that probably isn't needed in a lot of cases so long as there is adequate airflow. This is due in part to the higher voltages generally required to clock the new RAM high enough to actually outperform the old stuff.
    • First generation XMP is a crap shoot. Compatibility is usually a massive headache on all the first generation chipsets that support the new platform. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that modules come out at a breakneck pace with latencies dropping, clocks increasing and a lot of revisions to the IC's themselves.
    Not everything in the above pattern applies to the earliest generations, but from roughly DDR2 onward, it does.
    Exactly my point. :)
  3. I've got the early generation Corsair Dominator DD2 with heatsinks and clip on fan frame that reinforces the "active cooling every generation" cycle.
  4. I've got the early generation Corsair Dominator DD2 with heatsinks and clip on fan frame that reinforces the "active cooling every generation" cycle.
    I have both a DDR3 and a DDR4 set like that too. Again, both are early generation kits.
  5. I'm thinking that they just half-arsed the heatsinks.

    There's really no reason for them to get as hot as they do otherwise, even using a bit more power we're still talking <10W per DIMM, right?

    I'm pretty sure the G.Skill 5600 C36 kit that I'm running at 6200 (with active cooling) would run just peachy at its 5600 XMP settings.
  6. When I move to a DDR5 system, I'm gonna grab some of these, and pretend those fans are turbochargers electrically kept spooled up, delivering boost to my RAM's performance. If the RAM gets hotter and the fans spin up more, that's just the custom ECU tune to deliver more boost on the high-end. Only thing missing is the turbo whine and wastegate sounds. I hope I can use some kind of software monitoring to see the fan speeds. That will act as the boost gauge. How many people can say each of their DIMMs is twin-turbocharged? Surely that is worth whatever the asking price is.

    I know these are turbos cuz if they were superchargers, they would steal power from the RAM before adding back more performance than they stole. And clearly they would be centrifugal superchargers, not roots or twin-screw. Regardless, this RAM makes boost, so back the f*ck off me son. You can't handle this. If we benchmark our machines, you're gonna be going home without yours.

    EDIT:
    Guys, help me get this campaign going: Active Cool The World.
    Everything in the PC needs to be actively cooled. HDD, SSD, optical drive, RAM, sound card, parts of the motherboard besides the northbridge, not just a liquid cooling unit's radiator but also the waterblock itself and the water tubes, both sides of a graphics card, both top and bottom of PSUs, and let's also actively cool the things that are doing the active cooling. So fans on top of fans. Leave nothing in your PC without active cooling. Why run naturally aspirated? Boost gives you a rush you will not believe.
  7. Yea what is it with hat's being insulators instead of heat transfer? Do i need spikes on my hat to make good contact with my skull to facilitate proper heat transfer with a radiator mounted to the rear of the hat and a solar powered fan pushing air through it to cool my skull so I can overclock my brain?
  8. I've still got a set of 2133 MHz DDR3 G. Skill ram that came with fans. Never used them even once but I didn't try to overclock them either. They're still working in my old X79 rig. I took the fans out of the mounts and repurposed them in my HAF X case for the AMD rig.
  9. There's really no reason for them to get as hot as they do otherwise, even using a bit more power we're still talking <10W per DIMM, right?
    For a single chip, ~5W seems to be right at about the limit where you need active cooling.

    Now, on a DIMM, you have more than one chip, so ... maybe? If a dinky 80mm fan is the difference between running clean and memory errors in corner cases, I'll take the fan. Since we can't seem to have ECC.
  10. For a set of G.Skill 5600 C36 with Samsung ICs, running at 6200 C36, I'm seeing the below (also, actively cooled):

    1653092856629.png

    Timings section:
    1653092910071.png

    Power usage as shown by HWINFO64 can get a little higher than 5W, but that is for each DIMM, single-rank, so eight ICs. Not sure what dual-rank runs at because that's currently death for DDR5 speeds, as are the half-capacity ICs used in 2x 8GB kits.

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