Image: NVIDIA

NVIDIA users who are using their GeForce RTX 30 Series graphics cards specifically for mining purposes may want to stay away from the latest driver. A new video shared by Portuguese YouTuber Juliano Caju has revealed that the GeForce Game Ready 512.95 WHQL driver, which green team released yesterday with support for Hitman 3’s new Year 2 update and the Early Access launch of My Time At Sandrock, restores the full power of the Lite Hash Rate cryptocurrency limiter, something that miners could sidestep thanks to recent developments that include NiceHash’s unlocker. Users who install the new GeForce Game Ready 512.95 WHQL driver will encounter a return to clamped hash rates, which could range from 50% to 70% of the GPU’s real potential. The good news is that NVIDIA’s LHR restoration only applies to its latest driver; users can simply roll back to the previous 512.77 driver to avoid reduced hash rates.

Lite Hash Rate was NVIDIA’s desperate attempt to discourage miners from buying their cards. Unfortunately, the cryptomining community was quick to crack LHR and 70% hashrate unlock came fairly quickly after the first LHR cards were released. However, the full LHR unlock has been available for only two weeks now.

The 512.95 mining lock has been confirmed by a YouTuber Juliano Caju. His RTX 3060 card is limited to 25 MH/s ETH hashrate with ‘nbminer’, which is a lot slower than 46 MH/s on the unlocked driver.

Source: Juliano Caju (via VideoCardz)

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16 comments

  1. I'm supportive of low hash rate implementations, but as long as the jackasses can work around it by just using an older driver, it is essentially worthless.

    They aren't playing games on these mining farms, so they don't care about having th elatest game optimized driver. As long as they have good compute functionality, the older driver will work just fine for them.
  2. I thought it was hardware
    If I had to guess, it is probably implemented in firmware.

    Once they came up with a workaround, the firmware would have to be reflashed in order to apply a fix. This is probably being done by the driver.
  3. I'm supportive of low hash rate implementations, but as long as the jackasses can work around it by just using an older driver, it is essentially worthless.

    They aren't playing games on these mining farms, so they don't care about having th elatest game optimized driver. As long as they have good compute functionality, the older driver will work just fine for them.
    Sure. For mining farms but not for your average everyday or every other day miner hustler plus creator/gamer. 😜
  4. Sure. For mining farms but not for your average everyday or every other day miner hustler plus creator/gamer. 😜

    The thing is, those people are not the problem. It's the mining farms who are. They are the ones going out and hogging pallets and pallets worth of GPU's for themselves.
  5. The thing is, those people are not the problem. It's the mining farms who are. They are the ones going out and hogging pallets and pallets worth of GPU's for themselves.
    Are they still? Prices have come down and stock has come up.
  6. Are they still? Prices have come down and stock has come up.

    Things have certainly eased off, but prices are still not where they should be. Firstly, keep in mind we are at the end of the generation. Everything always cools down at the end of a generation. Who wants to spend big bucks on a high end GPU, only for a badder faster GPU to be out for the same price in the near future?

    Wake me when the generational equivalent of a 3090 is $1,000 (the Old Titan price point) and the equivalent of a 3080ti is $750, AT LAUNCH with walk-in availability off the shelf on launch day, with no lines, and no shortages. Everyone who wants one can get one at these prices with no hassle. Only then will we have returned to normal.

    The anticipation of selling to mining farms made even the chipmakers MSRP's exaggerated over the last couple of generations.

    That, and as soon as there is another increase in whatever ****coin of the day, we will instantly be right back at square one.
  7. Things have certainly eased off, but prices are still not where they should be. Firstly, keep in mind we are at the end of the generation. Everything always cools down at the end of a generation. Who wants to spend big bucks on a high end GPU, only for a badder faster GPU to be out for the same price in the near future?

    Wake me when the generational equivalent of a 3090 is $1,000 (the Old Titan price point) and the equivalent of a 3080ti is $750, AT LAUNCH with walk-in availability off the shelf on launch day, with no lines, and no shortages. Everyone who wants one can get one at these prices with no hassle. Only then will we have returned to normal.

    The anticipation of selling to mining farms made even the chipmakers MSRP's exaggerated over the last couple of generations.

    That, and as soon as there is another increase in whatever ****coin of the day, we will instantly be right back at square one.

    Sorry. You won't see those prices ever again. The 3090 FE launched at $1500 MSRP. You can currently find AIB 3090's for $1600-1700, which is normal price for higher end versions of the card.

    Welcome to the new normal. $1200-1500 high end GPU's. The 4090 is probably going to launch at $1500-1700. You're living in a dream world if you think prices are going to be lower on the next gen cards. They don't have to be. People will pay the inflated prices. Maybe you won't, but the majority of people will.
  8. Sorry. You won't see those prices ever again. The 3090 FE launched at $1500 MSRP. You can currently find AIB 3090's for $1600-1700, which is normal price for higher end versions of the card.

    Welcome to the new normal. $1200-1500 high end GPU's. The 4090 is probably going to launch at $1500-1700. You're living in a dream world if you think prices are going to be lower on the next gen cards. They don't have to be. People will pay the inflated prices. Maybe you won't, but the majority of people will.

    I think people are only willing to pay these prices because they are desperate to get something, and they don't have any alternatives.

    Once there are options in the marketplace again, and the shortages in silicon production abate, I think it is perfectly reasonable to expect pricing to ease off. I couldn't tell you how much through, but I am hopeful.

    There is nothing intrinsic about this generation of GPU's that mean they should cost more. Complexity has increased over the years, which means it is unreasonable to expect 2001 pricing, when I bought the fastest GPU money could buy for $349 (GeForce 3 Ti500) to come back, complexity isn't all that much higher today than at any other time in the last decade. It kind of started tapering off a bit with the 600-700 series. Meaning, an equivalent to the 700 series is a perfectly reasonable cost expectation. Maybe even a little lower due to increased volumes.

    At the same time, GPU sales volumes have gone up significantly. They dropped briefly when Intel and AMD started putting basic GPU's in their CPU's, resulting in the destruction of the low end discrete GPU market, but ever since they have been growing. PC Gaming is a larger market today than it has ever been. This means you spread the R&D costs over more sales than ever before, resulting in lower costs. You also tend to get better benefits out of other economies of scale, being able to put, more pressure on suppliers, etc, further reducing costs.

    In other words, the fundamentals are good for lower pricing than we are currently seeing. The only things keeping prices high are fab capacity shortages compared to demand and a lack of competition in our AMD/Nvidia duopoly. You need at least 3 close competitors in order to have a market that favors the consumer. I am hopeful Intel can come in and start making this happen, in the mid to low end at first, but over time maybe even in the high end.

    Fab capacity won't be constrained forever. It should ease over time as more capacity is added. It will likely take a while though.

    My barometer is for when a top end Titan-like consumer product (3090?) hits the $1,000 price point again, once adjusted for inflation. That would be $1,249 if it happened today. A non-extreme high end product (like the 780ti, 2080ti or 3080ti should hit its $699 price point again, adjusted for inflation, so if that were today, it should be ~$869

    In a market with healthy competition, and no demand/supply mismatches on the silicon production end, prices should find themselves here naturally. Only if there is collusion between the GPU companies, or continued supply/demand mismatches should pricing stay as effed up as it is.

    And if there is collusion, I hope the DOJ stops being asleep at the switch and rips them a new one.
  9. I tend to think the highest end cards will go the LN2 folks and miners who can justify the ROI and some professional hobbiests who just like to have cutting edge. I'll stick with a 8 series meaning 4080 something or 7800xt series because that serves my purpose well when it comes time. I was going to say I will skip... but I know I won't.
  10. Wake me when the generational equivalent of a 3090 is $1,000 (the Old Titan price point) and the equivalent of a 3080ti is $750, AT LAUNCH with walk-in availability off the shelf on launch day, with no lines, and no shortages. Everyone who wants one can get one at these prices with no hassle. Only then will we have returned to normal.
    I don't even like the sound of those prices. But yeah in general I agree, only when there are no lines, no shortages, and launch day availability are we back to "normal."

    My barometer is for when a top end Titan-like consumer product (3090?) hits the $1,000 price point again, once adjusted for inflation. That would be $1,249 if it happened today. A non-extreme high end product (like the 780ti, 2080ti or 3080ti should hit its $699 price point again, adjusted for inflation, so if that were today, it should be ~$869
    Ugh, that still sounds terrible. Prosumer card prices sure, have at it, but gaming flagship I wish would go back down to $600, and that's still kinda too high. Although that's not as bad as the midrange cards being $500+ now.

    Welcome to the new normal. $1200-1500 high end GPU's.
    Yyyeeeaaahhh, fuuuuuuuck that. That sure as f*ck isn't what I consider to be normal, and never will.

    I think people are only willing to pay these prices because they are desperate to get something, and they don't have any alternatives.
    I feel the same.

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