Image: Samsung Display

Samsung allegedly plans on ending its production of LCD displays in June, according to industry insiders. Previous reports had suggested that the display giant would continue manufacturing tried-and-true LCD panels for at least six more months, but sources with local outlet The Korea Times say that Samsung will close its liquid-crystal display business much earlier due to factors that include “rapid losses from falling LCD prices.” Samsung Display is now focusing its efforts on more advanced display technology, such as its new QD-OLED panels, which can already be found in select premium monitors that include Dell’s Alienware 34 Curved QD-OLED Gaming Monitor (AW3423DW). Samsung’s first QD-OLED TVs also launched this month for home theater enthusiasts who are seeking alternatives to existing (e.g., LG, Sony) models.

Image: Samsung

According to Display Supply Chain Consultants (DSCC), a U.S. market research firm, the average price index of LCD panels, measured against 100 in January 2014, will fall to 36.6 in September of this year. The figure has dropped farther from the record low of 41.5 in April of this year, and 58 percent lower than the record high of 87 in June 2021.

Also factored in was Samsung Electronics, the largest buyer of Samsung Display products, partnering with overseas LCD suppliers, including BOE Technology Group, a Chinese electronic components producer and AU Optronics Corp. (AUO), a Taiwanese LCD panel maker.

The display affiliate initially sought to close its LCD business in late 2020, but the plan was delayed at the request of its parent company, Samsung Electronics, due to a sudden spike in LCD prices amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Source: The Korea Times

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13 comments

  1. Seems premature to get rid of LCDs (I'm still a big fan of IPS panels), but we definitely need more manufacturers making OLED (or whatever other non-LCD tech is coming) in order to bring prices down. But I do indeed look forward to a world where LCDs are a thing of the past.
  2. With supply chain being such a PITA from gathering raw materials to being able to make parts. Cutting out parts that are low income relatively low volume to take those same materials and apply them to making OLED makes a lot of sense to me. You cut the production cost and open up more materials to making OLED parts and help bring down their cost at the same time. To me this sounds like a smart business move.

    If only graphics cards makers would realize that they can stop making 80 variants of each card and people will save the 40 dollar difference to get the slightly more expensive card.
  3. That's been there plan for a couple years now. Neo-QLED and QD-OLED are stop-gap production until they improve micro-LED.

    If you haven't seen one of their Micro-LED TV's on display you are missing out. It makes QD-OLED look like a CRT from the 80's. It's just stupidly complex and expensive to produce right now.
  4. Seems premature to get rid of LCDs (I'm still a big fan of IPS panels), but we definitely need more manufacturers making OLED (or whatever other non-LCD tech is coming) in order to bring prices down. But I do indeed look forward to a world where LCDs are a thing of the past.
    Samsung didn't make IPS panels - no one does except LG, depending on how you define 'IPS'.

    And I'm still a fan of IPS too. I'd rather have fast response times and color accuracy at more than one seating position, if that, than deal with the many shortcomings of VA, and Samsung's PLS technology that followed. But that's more me being a snob and having a few bad examples on hand too.

    I'd rectify that if Samsung wasn't also notorious for their Q/A, or lack thereof, as well as after-purchase support (or lack thereof).
  5. That's been there plan for a couple years now. Neo-QLED and QD-OLED are stop-gap production until they improve micro-LED.

    If you haven't seen one of their Micro-LED TV's on display you are missing out. It makes QD-OLED look like a CRT from the 80's. It's just stupidly complex and expensive to produce right now.
    These are all 'LCDs'.

    Yes, they're better to various degrees, but they're still not up to per-pixel lighting level. As OLEDs of various makes improve in brightness, panel size and format, and connectivity options, the reasoning behind LCD production will cease to exist.

    Granted, I'm not sure I can semantically distinguish between a potential per-pixel backlit micro-LED implementation and OLED. I doubt any marketing surrounding the topic will provide clarity either, as most LCD makers have been banking on a lack of clarity to sell their products for the last decade.
  6. These are all 'LCDs'.

    Yes, they're better to various degrees, but they're still not up to per-pixel lighting level. As OLEDs of various makes improve in brightness, panel size and format, and connectivity options, the reasoning behind LCD production will cease to exist.

    Granted, I'm not sure I can semantically distinguish between a potential per-pixel backlit micro-LED implementation and OLED. I doubt any marketing surrounding the topic will provide clarity either, as most LCD makers have been banking on a lack of clarity to sell their products for the last decade.
    Their Micro-LED is not LCD. It's not a crystal or organic panel at all. There's no filter layer. It's literally micro RGB LED's that are about 50 um. It can be configured in any size, shape, whatever. It's ridiculously brighter than LCD and OLED, with much higher levels of contrast. There's no decay, no burn in and over 100,000 hour life.

    It's where TV's are going. OLED is a stop gap.
  7. That's been there plan for a couple years now. Neo-QLED and QD-OLED are stop-gap production until they improve micro-LED.

    If you haven't seen one of their Micro-LED TV's on display you are missing out. It makes QD-OLED look like a CRT from the 80's. It's just stupidly complex and expensive to produce right now.
    Given how long it's taken OLED to go from stupidly complex and expensive to mainstream affordable (You can make a very valid case that it isn't even there yet), I am not going to hold my breath on micro-LED.

    I 100% agree that micro-LED will put OLED to shame, once we can get it at an efficiency and scale that it's affordable.
  8. Hmm.

    If no one is going to be making LCD's anymore, what are people going to be using for static displays where burn-in is a risk?

    I've been really tempted by a 42" LG C2 as my main monitor, and while people keep telling me OLED has gotten better, I need a monitor I can leave an MS Office or Browser window open on in the same position on my screen for 16 hours a day, ~300 days a year.

    From what I have seen, while better, we aren't there yet.
  9. Hmm.

    If no one is going to be making LCD's anymore, what are people going to be using for static displays where burn-in is a risk?

    I've been really tempted by a 42" LG C2 as my main monitor, and while people keep telling me OLED has gotten better, I need a monitor I can leave an MS Office or Browser window open on in the same position on my screen for 16 hours a day, ~300 days a year.

    From what I have seen, while better, we aren't there yet.
    Still plenty of LCD manufacturers - Samsung hardly had that market cornered. They just were fairly prolific with the VA panels you saw in various monitors.

    Still plenty of LCD to go around. TN will never die, it seems.
  10. Their Micro-LED is not LCD. It's not a crystal or organic panel at all. There's no filter layer. It's literally micro RGB LED's that are about 50 um. It can be configured in any size, shape, whatever. It's ridiculously brighter than LCD and OLED, with much higher levels of contrast. There's no decay, no burn in and over 100,000 hour life.

    It's where TV's are going. OLED is a stop gap.
    Seems I got it mixed up with the LCD backlight technique of using 'lots' of backlight zones.

    I agree, Micro-LED seems like a much better solution in terms of tackling both brightness and longevity issues, and I'm looking forward to the technology passing into the sub-stratospheric pricing range!

    From what I have seen, while better, we aren't there yet.
    Nope.

    And then you have both major OLED manufacturers (that is, Samsung and LG) using a TV-focused sub-pixel layout that is arsetastic for text rendering. I have two VA panels (the other major mortal sin somewhat endemic to that technology, but for no apparent reason) that have BGR layouts instead of RGB, and well, you have to run desktop scaling to get sharp text. 1:1 (or 100%) ranges from annoying to barely readable.

    Samsung appears to have borked this up more than LG (as always...), but it's still an issue on top of everything else. And the less blind your are and more you depend on working with text, the worse it is.
  11. Seems I got it mixed up with the LCD backlight technique of using 'lots' of backlight zones.

    I agree, Micro-LED seems like a much better solution in terms of tackling both brightness and longevity issues, and I'm looking forward to the technology passing into the sub-stratospheric pricing range!


    Nope.

    And then you have both major OLED manufacturers (that is, Samsung and LG) using a TV-focused sub-pixel layout that is arsetastic for text rendering. I have two VA panels (the other major mortal sin somewhat endemic to that technology, but for no apparent reason) that have BGR layouts instead of RGB, and well, you have to run desktop scaling to get sharp text. 1:1 (or 100%) ranges from annoying to barely readable.

    Samsung appears to have borked this up more than LG (as always...), but it's still an issue on top of everything else. And the less blind your are and more you depend on working with text, the worse it is.

    I have this problem on my current Asus XG438, but amusingly enough, under Linux Mint Cinnamon edition, I can set BGR subpixel smoothing, so it looks good there. It's only under Windows it looks like *** due to RGB being the only option for ClearType.

    Strangely enough Windows even looks pretty good in a VM under Linux. It is only native Windows that looks like ***.

    I have heard rumored that if you mount the screens upside down, and then flip the image in the OS, they essentially become RGB screens and thus the subpixel smoothing works. I haven't read enough into this to determine if it is true or not.
  12. Samsung didn't make IPS panels
    Yeah I know they didn't, wish they had though. My previous long-term primary monitor was a Dell U2410 with an LG IPS panel in it, that sold me on IPS. My current Dell S2721DGF monitor also has an LG IPS panel. I've seen a lot of other IPS panels including in HDTVs, always works out really well. I did mess around with VA for a while, like I had a Samsung C27HG70 monitor for a little bit. Loved the contrast ratio and the deep black levels, but hated everything else. IPS is the panel type for me. Never could stand TN panels, never liked LCD until VA and especially IPS came along. My 2009 Samsung LN37B650 HDTV also has a VA panel. So long as an LCD panel is no worse than VA then I am happy. I just want TN to f*cking die.

    LG made an early investment in IPS and then OLED, and both paid off well. So good job LG.

    I'd rectify that if Samsung wasn't also notorious for their Q/A, or lack thereof, as well as after-purchase support (or lack thereof).
    I also hate their panel lotteries.

    TN will never die, it seems.
    Yeah, unfortunately.

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