Image: Atari

The Atari brand is celebrating its 50th anniversary today, a meaningful occasion for just about anyone who’s familiar with gaming history and the company’s numerous milestones, including the first video arcade game in a cabinet and the Atari 2600 game console, something that continues to revered by classic games enthusiasts. Commemorating today’s event is a 50th Anniversary Interview with CEO Wade Rosen and founder Nolan Bushnell shared by IGN, in which the latter reflects on the brand that he created decades ago in 1972 and how it left a lasting impact on the games industry. Atari’s troubles began when its home console and computer divisions had to be sold off due to the great video game crash of 1983, but the brand has continued to endure to some extent, with recent attempts of getting into other businesses that include cryptocurrency. Atari is even trying to develop hotels with a gaming theme.

“The story of the early days of Atari is, in many ways, the history of the birth of video games,” said Wade Rosen, Atari CEO. “I’m excited to share this very special conversation with founder Nolan Bushnell as we celebrate the tremendous impact of Atari on popular culture and the video game industry over the past fifty years.”

One of the world’s most iconic consumer brands and interactive entertainment producers — is marking the celebration of the company’s founding on June 27, 1972, with an exclusive video featuring a discussion between CEO Wade Rosen and founder Nolan Bushnell.

In a video available exclusively on IGN and Atari.com, CEO Wade Rosen and founder Nolan Bushnell sit down to discuss Atari’s legacy of creativity and innovation, its formative role in the development of the modern video game industry, the Atari brand’s sustained role in popular culture, and what will define the company as it pushes forward for the next 50 years.

Source: Atari

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6 comments

  1. You mean the ghosts of Atari's past? The current one is in name only.
    You mean nfET? ;)

    As mentioned in my BIO, I grew up with Atari. My first experience with them was pong at my grandparent's house in the late 70s. By the early 80s, I had my first console before it was called the VCS. It actually featured some dev tricks by flipping the switches are certain times to trigger dev modes with some games. Not long after that, I got the Atari 400 with which I learned Basic, Pascal, some Assembly, and machine code along with a little CP/M and of course DOS 1/2/3. Fun times back then. I remember being jealous of the STs when they came out and watching the battles between Commodore and Atari for ultimate home supremacy along with Apple/TRS/IBM/Dragon/Sinclair/Tandy to name a few.
  2. You mean nfET? ;)

    As mentioned in my BIO, I grew up with Atari. My first experience with them was pong at my grandparent's house in the late 70s. By the early 80s, I had my first console before it was called the VCS. It actually featured some dev tricks by flipping the switches are certain times to trigger dev modes with some games. Not long after that, I got the Atari 400 with which I learned Basic, Pascal, some Assembly, and machine code along with a little CP/M and of course DOS 1/2/3. Fun times back then. I remember being jealous of the STs when they came out and watching the battles between Commodore and Atari for ultimate home supremacy along with Apple/TRS/IBM/Dragon/Sinclair/Tandy to name a few.
    What no Amiga love? ;)
  3. I badly wanted an Amiga, but C64 was all we could afford. By the time I had disposable income the PCs had largely caught up.
    That's how I felt with everything in that gen. I was torn between the Amiga 1000(?) and a 1040 ST though but either was way too much money to upgrade to. I knew somebody who got a 130XE when it came out and had some fun using the built-in RAM disk option. As a teenager, even with some odd jobs, it was beyond what I could afford but with my dad's help, we just upgraded the 400 (started with a cassette drive>1st double sided-double density drive(RANA)>then another (Indus GT)>upgraded ram from 16K to 48K>upgraded membrane keyboard to mechanical, 1st color printer (Okidata) and rode it until he got me a Tandy 1000Ex for Christmas years later. I did a couple of upgrades to it and then bowed out of the scene for a bit until the early 2000s when I started tinkering with parts and rigs being handed down to me from friends and coworkers and then eventually fully got back into it all with a store-bought VPR Matrix from BB that I ended up completely rebuilding and maxing out over the next 5-7 years.

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