Intel has distanced itself from some of its older iGPUs.

As detailed in a new thread on its Communities forum, Intel has moved its “6th – 10th Gen Intel Processor Graphics and related Intel Atom, Pentium, and Celeron processor graphics to a legacy software support model.” These products will no longer receive Day-0 game support, only software support in the form of “critical fixes and security vulnerabilities.”

11th Gen Core “Rocket Lake” and newer processors are not affected and will continue to receive the usual support, including Day-0 game updates.

Here is a list of all of the products that are impacted, per Intel:

  • 10th Generation Intel Core processors with Intel Iris Plus graphics (Codename Ice Lake)
  • 10th Generation Intel Core processors with Intel UHD Graphics (Codename Comet Lake)
  • 9th Generation Intel Core processors, related Pentium/Celeron processors, and Intel Xeon processors, with Intel UHD Graphics 630 (Codename Coffee Lake-R)
  • 8th Generation Intel Core processors, related Pentium/ Celeron processors, and Intel Xeon processors, with Intel Iris Plus Graphics 655 and Intel UHD Graphics 610, 620, 630, P630 (Codename Kaby Lake-R, Coffee Lake)
  • Intel Pentium and Celeron processor family (Codename Gemini Lake)
  • 7th Generation Intel Core processors, related Pentium/Celeron processors, and Intel Xeon processors, with Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640, 650 and Intel HD Graphics 610, 615, 620, 630, P630 (Codename Kaby Lake)
  • 6th Generation Intel Core, Intel Core M, and related Pentium processors with Intel Iris Graphics 540, Intel Iris Graphics 550, Intel Iris Pro Graphics 580, and Intel HD Graphics 510, 515, 520, 530 (Codename Skylake)
  • Intel Pentium Processor family and Intel Celeron Processor family (Codename Jasper Lake),
  • Intel Core Processor with Intel Hybrid Technology (Codename Lakefield)
  • Intel Atom, Pentium and Celeron processor family (Codename Elkhart Lake)

Intel launched its first 10th Gen Core “Comet Lake” processors in August 2019, which some critics have argued isn’t all that long ago. It is one of the last Intel desktop CPU lineups to be built on a 14 nm process.

The majority of these chips (non-F) featured an iGPU in the form of the UHD 630, the Core i9-10900K version of which is listed with a graphics base frequency of 350 MHz and graphics max dynamic frequency of 1.20 GHz by Intel.

Source: Intel

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3 comments

  1. Some of these products are less than 2 years old.

    Yeah it's not total driver support, but the fact that Intel hasn't really been able to get behind a unified driver architecture (or, at the very least, this news update is implying if they do, it's significantly lacking) is saying something.

    Can you imagine the uproar if nVidia announced they were going to stop driver support for the RTX 3070/80/90? Those were released at the same time as some of these 10th Gen products.
  2. Yep, that has been my concern as well. This has become common at Intel. A few years ago they even pulled all the existing updates for end-of-life products from their site.

    I don't expect indefinite feature updates, but products should enter a maintenance phase after some predefined length of time and from then on receive bug fixes and security updates. I think most consumer cards from Nvidia and AMD receive about ~10 years of support in the way of driver updates.

    One nice thing about Linux (or open source in general) is that the community can pick up the slack when the manufacturer no longer provides support, though that doesn't work so well with Nvidia.

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