Image: ASUS

The options for OLED displays that can be used more comfortably up close are growing.

As spotted by TFT Central, which had the privilege of demoing the new hardware at the manufacturer’s recent Apex event, ASUS has launched the ROG Swift PG42UQ, a relatively smaller OLED display. The monitor is available for pre-order now in select regions, including the UK, where it can be found at retailers such as Overclockers UK for £1,398.95 alongside its bigger brother, the PG48UQ, which has been listed for £1,498.99.

ASUS is calling its ROG Swift OLED PG42UQ the “world’s first 42-inch OLED gaming monitor,” although somewhat similar alternatives, such as LG’s C2 42-inch evo OLED TV, have already been readily available on the market.

ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG42UQ highlights:

  • 41.5-inch 4K (3840×2160) OLED panel
  • Up to 138 Hz refresh rate (OC)
  • 0.1 ms response time
  • HDR10 support
  • Display Stream Compression (DSC) technology and HDMI 2.1 with full 48 Gbps bandwidth
  • DisplayPort 1.4 DSC (x1), HDMI 2.1 (x2), (HDMI 2.0) (x2)
  • USB hub (x4 USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A)
  • NVIDIA G-SYNC compatible
  • Anti-glare micro-texture coating for reducing reflections
  • Three stereo speakers

ASUS ROG initially detailed its ROG Swift OLED PG42UQ and PG48UQ monitors in January 2022, claiming that they deliver “a gaming experience that typical OLED TVs just can’t match.”

These expansive displays will depict gaming worlds in glorious detail with their 4K resolution. Not only do they deliver deep, inky blacks and dazzling highlights, but they also offer true 10-bit color, covering 98% of the wide DCI-P3 color gamut for vibrant, lifelike images. They’re tuned for accurate colors, as well, as they’re factory-calibrated to achieve a ΔE of less than 2 right out of the box. Whether you’re playing the latest game or kicking back with a movie, you’ll experience your favorite content just as its creator intended.

Both displays also feature a custom heatsink for lower temperatures, which “prevents” image burn-in, according to ASUS, although it’s unclear how this is possible based on the nature of OLED technology.

Source: ASUS

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11 comments

  1. Why, why oh why on Earth do these displays (not specific to Asus) include speakers? RAH! Internet rage triggered level 11!
    I never understood that either. My XG438Q does as well, and it is a complete waste.

    I actually blocked the module that supports the GPU sound from loading in Linux just so I don't accidentally switch to it as an output device. In Windows I have it disabled in device manager.
  2. I'm not going to lie though, speakers aside (what an annoyance) this looks like it would be an awesome monitor (though I think I might prefer FreeSync instead these days now that FreeSync is actually decent, and works with any GPU, that way my monitor doesn't lock me in to Nvidia only.

    The only reason I don't go out and buy somthing like this today is because I am concerned my 8 hours a day of Word/Excel/Outlook are going to burn in...

    I can't justify having a separate monitor just for gaming. I already have two 74" long desks in an L shape in th ecorner of my office. There just isn't enough space for more stuff.

    Edit:

    Actually, it says "G-Sync compatible". Is that the modern codeword for "It's actually FreeSync2 but has been validated for use with Nvidia GPU's"?
  3. I don't think I'd be comfortable purchasing a high-end monitor from Asus, if only for fear (justified or not) of having to deal with their RMA service.

    I haven't done so well at keeping up with with the evolution of displays since my last purchase, so shopping for a new one is going to be quite the adventure, and that's something I hope to do within the next year. Monitors may also be the closest thing one can get to a "dumb" TV, so if you don't want your TV watching you...

    There's also a 48-inch model of the panel from the title: https://rog.asus.com/us/monitors/above-34-inches/rog-swift-oled-pg48uq-model/

    Regarding FreeSync2, I think that new displays should instead advertise AMD FreeSync Premium Pro instead, as AMD rebranded its VRR technology a couple of years ago:
    In January 2017, AMD announced the second generation of FreeSync known as FreeSync 2 HDR. In January 2020, AMD Announced FreeSync 2 HDR was rebranding to FreeSync Premium Pro.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FreeSync

    From the same article:
    AMD FreeSync technology is split up into three tiers known as AMD FreeSync, AMD FreeSync Premium, and AMD FreeSync Premium Pro.
  4. I don't think I'd be comfortable purchasing a high-end monitor from Asus, if only for fear (justified or not) of having to deal with their RMA service.
    I think it's six of one half dozen of the other.

    On the one hand, I keep hearing that Asus has poor RMA service, but on the other, I've never actually had to use their RMA service, as their stuff has been absolutely bulletproof for me. I've had tons of stuff go bad on me, but every component I've ever owned from Asus has just worked and never quit.

    I've also never had a screen die on me, except my old Panny Plasma TV I used in my home theater, and that was an easy fix, by just replacing the power board in it.

    Personally I wouldn't hesitate to buy anyhting Asus. In fact, these days they are my most trusted brand in most markets they are in.
  5. On the one hand, I keep hearing that Asus has poor RMA service, but on the other, I've never actually had to use their RMA service, as their stuff has been absolutely bulletproof for me. I've had tons of stuff go bad on me, but every component I've ever owned from Asus has just worked and never quit.
    I had a bad experience dealing with their warranty process for an issue that developed on a new-at-the-time monitor from their business line. Without going into detail, I opted to workaround the issue rather than invest any more time attempting to communicate with Asus.

    Maybe my experience was atypical. Maybe they've changed. I can't say I'd have fared any better with XYZ Corp., but the experience was unpleasant enough that I first look to competitors. That said, I haven't ruled them out entirely.
    I've also never had a screen die on me, except my old Panny Plasma TV I used in my home theater, and that was an easy fix, by just replacing the power board in it.
    My LCD displays absolutely refuse to die, which is actually becoming annoying as I feel less of an excuse to upgrade. ;)
  6. Maybe my experience was atypical. Maybe they've changed. I can't say I'd have fared any better with XYZ Corp., but the experience was unpleasant enough that I first look to competitors. That said, I haven't ruled them out entirely.
    Yeah - Asus stuff is generally good.

    But the RMA process is ~that~ bad. If you need it, you are better off just writing it off. I've had to use it three times: a motherboard, a GPU, and a chromebook, and you'd have thought I would have learned my lesson the first time. I severely regretted even opening the claim each time.
  7. Yeah - Asus stuff is generally good.

    But the RMA process is ~that~ bad. If you need it, you are better off just writing it off. I've had to use it three times: a motherboard, a GPU, and a chromebook, and you'd have thought I would have learned my lesson the first time. I severely regretted even opening the claim each time.

    I had 2 experiences with Asus RMA and both times it went fine (so were the ones I had with intel and Samsung also) .

    Most hardware I got from Asus always worked fine other then a DOA motherboard which was replaced by the store, but I do on occasion watch some repair channels on YT and their laptops seem to die in droves, now ofc if I see how some people handle their machines that should be no surprise and could be they have to repair more of them due to their bad RMA dept. (or reputation of them) compared to other brands, who knows?

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