Image: Intel

Intel has shared a new Q&A video about its Arc A-series desktop GPUs, and it includes a slide that can confirm four total SKUs, along with their specifications.

  • Similar to Core processors, Intel’s A-series desktop GPUs are split into multiple performance tiers.
  • Arc 3 is aimed at “enhanced gaming,” while Arc 5 and Arc 7 are aimed at “advanced” and “high-performance” gaming, respectively.
  • Arc A770 and A750 are the most powerful of Intel’s A-series GPUs, with the former featuring 32 Xe cores and up to 16 GB of GDDR6 memory.
  • The clock speeds listed are not a fixed frequency, but the average frequency that these GPUs run at “across various heavy and light workloads.”
  • Intel’s A770 Limited Edition GPU features 16 GB of GDDR6 memory, double the amount of “most” AIC models, hence the dual specification.
  • Supported features include HDR, variable refresh rate, AI-powered upscaling with XeSS, ray tracing, customizable performance and broadcasting (via Arc Control), and dedicated video encoding hardware for popular codecs that include AV1.
  • Intel hasn’t shared a launch date for its Arc 5 and Arc 7 models yet, but the A380 is already available.
Image: Intel
Image: Intel

From the Intel Arc site:

The Intel Arc A770 and A750 GPUs comprise the top tier with 32 and 28 Xe cores respectively. In the middle, the Arc A580 GPU has 24 Xe cores, and the budget-friendly Arc A380 with 8 Xe cores makes our entry-level desktop card.

These specs are all important ingredients in rasterization and ray tracing recipes, particularly the graphics clock speed. It’s not a fixed frequency, rather it’s the average frequency these chips run at across various heavy and light workloads.

These specs are straightforward enough, except for the VRAM size on the Intel Arc A770 GPU. What’s up with the two numbers shown there? When our add-in card (AIC) partners build their own versions of Arc A770 cards, most will come with 8 GB of GDDR6 memory. The Intel-branded card (IBC) — our special A770 Limited Edition GPU — features double that.

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8 comments

  1. I don't think anyone cares any more in the enthusiast arena.

    I think it depends on where they are priced.

    The A770 could have merit.

    If it scales with cores and clock speed, it should be 4.2 times faster than the A380, which would place it somewhere between a 3070ti and a 3080, which isn't terrible for a first attempt at an arch.

    Sell it for $500 and it will be a decent value, at least until next gen hits (which is soon) After that it will need to be cheaper.

    It will mostly be competing with Nvidia's 40 series though, so it may just be getting to market too late.
  2. It will mostly be competing with Nvidia's 40 series though, so it may just be getting to market too late.
    Yup.

    I think Intel was counting heavily on endless, unlimited sales to miners. That boom has busted, at least until the next cycle. Intel is about a year too late to the party.

    Even if you ignore the upcoming GPU generation which is poised to drop any moment now, both AMD and nVidia are pushing heavily to clear current inventory of current gen products - prices are dropping (yay~!) and will probably continue to do so until inventory starts to clear.

    It's probably the absolute worst time for Intel to be introducing a new product. Intel will have to get uncomfortably skinny on margin if they want people to look past the newness, the driver issues, the performance, etc. But, if I had to take a guess based on what Intel has done in the past - they will stick to their guns, overprice the product relative to the competition - market the bejesus out of Intel Inside, throw these things to every influencer on Twitch and Youtube that they can possibly convince to run one, and strongarm every OEM they can into carrying these on prebuilts -- and hope to god they make it out the other end and survive long enough to push Gen 2.
  3. Doesn't matter what the specs are if they can't produce drivers that are worth a ****.

    I haven't had any experience with their drivers for their discrete cards, but their iGPU drivers have always been good. Very stable and functional.

    They were a little limited on the feature side, but that's largely because the hardware was rather limited. No need to throw a full on "gaming driver" at something that can't run games.

    I presumed they would be adding more features to their discrete drivers. Is that not the case?

    As far as drivers go, I hear a lot of people heaping praise on AMD's drivers these days. I'll agree, they are better than back in the Catalyst Control Center days, but honestly, I think they are trying to do too much. The drivers are quite bloated. I would much rather have something lighter weight.

    IMHO, the Nvidia drivers hit the sweet spot, as long as you don't install GeForce Experience. They have all the settings, and none of the bloat.
  4. I think it depends on where they are priced.

    The A770 could have merit.

    If it scales with cores and clock speed, it should be 4.2 times faster than the A380, which would place it somewhere between a 3070ti and a 3080, which isn't terrible for a first attempt at an arch.

    Sell it for $500 and it will be a decent value, at least until next gen hits (which is soon) After that it will need to be cheaper.

    It will mostly be competing with Nvidia's 40 series though, so it may just be getting to market too late.
    Apparently the A770 runs between a RTX3060 and 3060Ti, maybe faster in some games.

    Also the "mid-low end" 30 series should remain for a while, so technically ARC will be competing with ampere.
  5. Apparently the A770 runs between a RTX3060 and 3060Ti, maybe faster in some games.

    Also the "mid-low end" 30 series should remain for a while, so technically ARC will be competing with ampere.

    Yeah, the "assuming linear scaling" bit is always a bit iffy, as it assumes ideal circumstances. I only use it when I have no other data. I have not seen any numbers for anything but the A380 Arc cards.
  6. I haven't had any experience with their drivers for their discrete cards, but their iGPU drivers have always been good. Very stable and functional.

    They were a little limited on the feature side, but that's largely because the hardware was rather limited. No need to throw a full on "gaming driver" at something that can't run games.

    I presumed they would be adding more features to their discrete drivers. Is that not the case?

    As far as drivers go, I hear a lot of people heaping praise on AMD's drivers these days. I'll agree, they are better than back in the Catalyst Control Center days, but honestly, I think they are trying to do too much. The drivers are quite bloated. I would much rather have something lighter weight.

    IMHO, the Nvidia drivers hit the sweet spot, as long as you don't install GeForce Experience. They have all the settings, and none of the bloat.
    GN has done a few videos on the A380 and A750 around the drivers. They're complete trash. Hopefully Intel will fix them.

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