Image: Samsung

Samsung has announced that the Odyssey Ark, the world’s first 55-inch 4K rotating curved gaming screen, is now available for purchase for $3,499.99. It can be found at a number of popular retailers, including Samsung, Amazon, and Best Buy.

Image: Samsung

From the Samsung Newsroom:

Samsung’s Odyssey Ark, the world’s first 55-inch 4K rotating curved gaming screen, is now available for purchase. Odyssey Ark combines premium 4K gaming features like Samsung’s Quantum Matrix Mini LED display technology, 165Hz refresh rate, 1ms response time with immersive surround sound for an unparalleled cinematic gaming experience.

The Odyssey Ark available to purchase for $3,499.99 on Samsung.com, Amazon.com, and Best Buy – at select retail stores nationwide and BestBuy.com. For more information, please visit Samsung.com.

Samsung has also shared the following infographics that illustrate the Odyssey Ark’s specifications and some of its unique features, including rotation of the screen to Cockpit Mode and Ark Dial accessory for adjusting screen size and ratio.

Image: Samsung
Image: Samsung

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10 comments

  1. I admit that I've been fortunate to have been able to spend a bit more than planned for my rigs in the last 5-7 years but even then, yeah, no. The $1500 I spent for the LG C42 for my main rig still feels like a good value with a significant "Wow!" experience and conversely the $300 for the MSI 21.9" for the laptop, but this seems bonkers. I'll give them credit for continually finding new niches within a niche market though.
  2. I will say having three of these in the tall orientation would be crazy immersive in a game.. like.. bigger than life size. But you can do the same thing with a projector setup and not have to drive 3 4k monitors or spend 10k in displays.
  3. I remember reading complaints here about built-in speakers on premium displays. Well, this one has "60W 2.2.2 channel (4 speakers, 2 woofers)" Sound Dome Technology.

    That would make a triple-monitor setup what? 6.6.6 channel audio? :devilish:
  4. I remember reading complaints here about built-in speakers on premium displays. Well, this one's got "60W 2.2.2 channel (4 speakers, 2 woofers)" Sound Dome Technology.

    That would make a triple-monitor setup what? 6.6.6 channel audio? :devilish:

    What kind of notation is that 2.2.2 Wouldn't it be 4.2? Or is it different speakers for different orientations, as your left and right become top and bottom when you rotate it?

    Could they be used as a form of ghetto Atmos? :p

    Yeah, I'm one of the people that prefer my computer displays (and home theater screens) to not have speakers, as I will never use them, and they just become a constant nuisance, as they are accidentally enabled once you unplug your normal speakers, or your mother in law doesn't understand and accidentally enables them on the home theater setup.

    My philosophy when it comes to tech is that if you are not going to use a feature, it ideally should not exist at all in your hardware/software, or at the very least it should be able to be disabled separate from the OS/software in some sort of BIOS or hardware configuration.
  5. Could they be used as a form of ghetto Atmos?
    Yep. I'm seeing more and more of these types of speaker layouts. They sort of started with sound bars and now it seems like the display manufacturers are tinkering with it more as well. I can't remember which ones but from minimalistic to wtf over-the-top I've read some interesting specs in the last year or two for various TVs. Granted even before spatial audio we saw some similar things with PC speaker kits in the 90s and early 2000s like 4.1, 2.1, and such but it's really gotten wacky now. Atmos opened the gates for an anything-goes approach.

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