NVIDIA Is Following Up on Reports of Melted RTX 4090 16-Pin Power Adapters

Image: NVIDIA

NVIDIA is following up on reports from multiple RTX 4090 owners who claim their 16-pin power adapters melted while gaming. The first was reported on by Tom’s Hardware yesterday who then later updated that another had come forward. This claim was made by Redditor user NoDuelsPolicy who said they had a similar experience while playing Black Desert with their ASUS TUF Gaming RTX 4090. They said the screen went black, fans spun up, and they quickly powered down the system to investigate. Upon closer examination, it could be seen that the card and adapter were both damaged.

Image: NoDuelsPolicy on Reddit

This image does share a similarity with those from the previous user in that the two corner connectors/pins in the row next to the 4-pin power-sense connectors are the most damaged while the row furthest away is largely unscathed. Tom’s Hardware reached out to NVIDIA who said they are now investigating these reports.

“We are investigating the reports. We are in contact with the first owner and will be reaching out to the other for additional information.” —Nvidia’s Bryan Del Rizzo

Multiple companies have addressed possible re-orientation for connecting to the new 12VHPWR connector and even provided guides for using the new adapter. It has been said that users should avoid bending the adapter cable within 35mm of the connector. CableMod most recently release a right-angle adapter to allow owners the means of a cleaner approach to cable management vs bending the included stock adapter/cable that comes with graphics cards. EVGA announced the PowerLink 41s power adapter, which included power filtering components, with 4x 8-pin connectors, for its RTX 3090 Ti that featured the 12VHPWR connector. One manufacturer, Zotac, has gone so far as to state that the 4x 8-pin-to-12VHPWR cable for its GeForce RTX 4090 graphics cards has a limited service life of 30 connect/disconnects. Regardless of the outcome of NVIDIA’s investigation, it does appear that owners of high-powered graphics cards using the new connector should pay close attention to how they are installed.

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Peter Brosdahl
As a child of the 70’s I was part of the many who became enthralled by the video arcade invasion of the 1980’s. Saving money from various odd jobs I purchased my first computer from a friend of my dad, a used Atari 400, around 1982. Eventually it would end up being a lifelong passion of upgrading and modifying equipment that, of course, led into a career in IT support.

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