Image: EA/Respawn

The future is looking bright for single-player games in the Star Wars universe.

During yesterday’s Q3 earnings call, EA COO/CFO Blake Jorgensen revealed that Respawn Entertainment’s Jedi: Fallen Order has managed to sell far better than anticipated. The action-adventure game performed so well that the publisher is expecting 10 million copies sold by the end of March, a 2 million increase from initial estimates.

“Sales of Star Wars: Jedi Fallen Order significantly beat our expectations. We had forecast 6 million to 8 million units for the fiscal year, but hit the high end of that in the third quarter, and we now anticipate selling around 10 million units in the fiscal year, a very strong result for a single-player action game.”

Those figures fall short of your average AAA multiplayer title (the latest Star Wars: Battlefront games have sold over 30 million copies), but Jorgensen’s ending statement does pave the way for more solo, story-driven games in EA’s future. With these being less of a gamble, a sequel to Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order, in particular, seems quite assured.

Respawn’s Brand Strategy Director Charlie Houser has already confirmed his team’s willingness to continue Cal Kestis’s story. That may be of little surprise, since Fallen Order’s ending implied that the Jedi’s adventures were far from over.

“We’ve had an absolute blast [making Fallen Order]. For a new team thats come together at Respawn, its been a lot of learning to pull this off. Pending player reaction and feedback, and how everyone’s feeling about it, we would love to continue making awesome experiences and stories and keep telling that story in Star Wars.”

New job listings spotted in December (a Senior Character Artist, Level Designer, and Senior Software Engineer) also revealed that Respawn was seeking additional hires for its “Star Wars team,” which is already hard at work on a “third person action/adventure game.”

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8 Comments

  1. These types of things are always entertaining. So much for “vote with you wallet” right? Consumerism is quite comical these days, complain about things when they aren’t right, but never actually follow up to teach companies a lesson, be it games or anything else.

    1. WTF are you even talking about? Fallen Order is a great game and people “voted with their wallets”.

      Hopefully the sequel will be even better and sell even more copies.

      1. I didn’t mention anything about the quality of the game, merely commenting on the fact that EA is allowed to get away with a slap on the wrist given their continued bullshit because consumers are too impulsive to teach them a real lesson by not buying their products, if even for one or two titles.

  2. Hopefully this will lead EA to invest more into their singleplayer titles.

    I still havent played Fallen Order, but it’s definitely on my ‘to do’ list.

  3. [QUOTE=”Captindecisive, post: 9869, member: 338″]
    I didn’t mention anything about the quality of the game, merely commenting on the fact that EA is allowed to get away with a slap on the wrist given their continued bullshit because consumers are too impulsive to teach them a real lesson by not buying their products, if even for one or two titles.
    [/QUOTE]

    Well, two schools of thought here.

    A) You don’t like what the company is doing, so boycott everything the company does

    B) You don’t like what the company is doing with specific things, so boycott only those specific things.

    I agree that EA does a lot of things poorly and I do generally stay away from their titles. But for me, personally, if they put out a decent product I won’t ~not~ buy it just because it was published by EA. Punish bad behavior, but reward good.

  4. [QUOTE=”Captindecisive, post: 9856, member: 338″]
    These types of things are always entertaining. So much for “vote with you wallet” right? Consumerism is quite comical these days, complain about things when they aren’t right, but never actually follow up to teach companies a lesson, be it games or anything else.
    [/QUOTE]

    I’m not sure what you are going on about. People DID vote with their wallets. EA only approved the title to show people that there was no money in single player games. Clearly, that was false. The public voted and clearly told EA: [I]”If you make a quality single player game, we will buy it.”[/I] It’s that simple. The game was a success because it was well made. It used a popular franchise license to great effect. It told a good story. It wasn’t too short and it wasn’t too long. It was the kind of Star Wars game we’d been wanting for more than a decade now.

  5. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 9894, member: 96″]
    Well, two schools of thought here.

    A) You don’t like what the company is doing, so boycott everything the company does

    B) You don’t like what the company is doing with specific things, so boycott only those specific things.

    I agree that EA does a lot of things poorly and I do generally stay away from their titles. But for me, personally, if they put out a decent product I won’t ~not~ buy it just because it was published by EA. Punish bad behavior, but reward good.
    [/QUOTE]

    Rewarding good behavior [I]is [/I]a good thing, but this “good” behavior is driven by greed and the not the intent to actually be fair or truthful to its customers; how are they going to prove that they’re trying to be better towards their customers? Maybe a good start is not hiring psychiatrists to implement features that prey on addictions and impulses? By not having random chance loot boxes and instead offering direct items to buy? There are several things they could do to continue making money through microtransactions that don’t involve shady and downright vile practices that prey on human psychological weakness/impairments; so I pick option A until they show some concrete, verifiable proof that they are actually trying to be better. This title was a step in the right direction, but not enough to show that they’ve learned a lesson and are trying to be better.

    IF they can continue the trend they’ve done with this game, then maybe I would consider an EA title again at some point, but 1 or 2 titles later is not the time. I really do hope EA makes changes, and I’ll just have to be ok with the fact that the changes are made out of greed and not out of good nature or fairness to their customers.

    [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 9900, member: 6″]
    I’m not sure what you are going on about. People DID vote with their wallets. EA only approved the title to show people that there was no money in single player games. Clearly, that was false. The public voted and clearly told EA: [I]”If you make a quality single player game, we will buy it.”[/I] It’s that simple. The game was a success because it was well made. It used a popular franchise license to great effect. It told a good story. It wasn’t too short and it wasn’t too long. It was the kind of Star Wars game we’d been wanting for more than a decade now.
    [/QUOTE]

    If it was said this was approved only to show people that there was no money in single player games, someone lied. First, Respawn makes quality games that, so far, have been polished and work as intended, at least more-so than a lot of other studios these days. Second, it’s a Star Wars single player game, people who are fans of the franchise have been waiting for this for a LONG time. If they were going to try to make a power move to prove that single player games aren’t worth making, why use this combo?

    This is purely speculation, but personally I say this was a power move all together. EA knew they were on thin ice with its customers, so if the title didn’t do well out of people insisting they won’t partake in EA titles, the game fails and they stop focusing on single player at all; on the other hand, it’s a beloved franchise using a quality studio, regardless of the outcome, they win. Either people boycott with their wallets and the game fails as well as single player prospects from EA, or impulsiveness wins because its Star Wars and single player.

    I’m glad it was a good title, I’m glad Respawn lived up to their reputation, and I’m glad EA kept their promise to keep it microtransaction free. Hopefully they can keep this type of behavior a standard, and hopefully they finally learned a simple fact, if you make a quality game, it sells itself.

  6. Obviously, EA hoped it would do well but they’ve been singing the mantra that single player only games aren’t profitable for years. I think it’s one of those cases where they couldn’t exactly lose. If the game was successful, then EA made money. If the game wasn’t, it would be proof that there was no money in single player games and it would use it as an example of why they don’t do single player games anymore.

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