Application & Synthetic Testing Continued

V-Ray

Unsurprisingly, the ASUS Prime X299 Edition 30 with the 10980XE turns in the highest performance we’ve seen to date in this test with a result of 33,635 K samples overclocked and 28,457 K samples at stock speeds.

Cinebench R20 – Multithread

Cinebench is a nice test for comparing multi-threaded workloads that takes advantage of the CPU’s newer instruction sets. It scales very well with core counts as well. Again, it is no surprise that the ASUS Prime X299 Edition 30 does well here at both stock and overclocked speeds.

Cinebench R20 – Single Thread

In the single-threaded Cinebench test, we see things come down to raw IPC and clock speeds primarily. Although, cache design and size comes into play as well. Amazingly, most of our test systems are all in the same general ballpark here. The 3900X does the best, but the Intel offerings aren’t all that far behind. However, the Ryzen 7 2700X is really starting to show its age here.

Blender

In both stock and overclocked form, the 10980XE equipped Prime X299 Edition 30 is again ahead of the other test systems.

Gooseberry

Another good showing for the Prime X299 Edition 30 and the 10980XE.

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9 Comments

  1. For a 750 dollar board I am also surprised by the BIOS. Space isn’t cheap in that arena and they could have designed a nice color pallet in the Bios to resemble the motherboard.

    It’s especially damning when my 170 dollar motherboard has twice the size bios storage.

  2. I’d love a HEDT board with excellent VRM’s (and cooling), but forgo all RGB and built-in NIC(s), Audio, Video, etc… a basic quality (8+ layers) board with PS2 and USB plus M.2 port or two – even memory slots limited to 4 slots and surface mounted – nothing else other than direct cpu connected slots for add-in cards. Asus was almost there with Apex x299 – That’s a board I’d pay extra for.

  3. No Power and Temp measurements? Nice review, and if I had the money and a nuclear reactor, would be something I’d like to build one of these days..

  4. We’ve never actually had power measurements in our motherboard reviews. That even goes back to the HardOCP days. Largely, it’s dependent on the CPU and figuring out exactly what the motherboard does is a bit tricky. That said, power is the same as it was in the 10980XE review. 617w when overclocked.

    As for temperatures, I normally cover what the VRM heat sink reads at. An oversight on my part. These reviews are getting more complex and its easy to miss something like that. However, I did note it and the VRM heat sink was a mere 102F.

  5. It’s one of the nicest motherboards I’ve ever reviewed. That’s saying something given that I’ve been doing this for over 14 years.

  6. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 10047, member: 6″]
    We’ve never actually had power measurements in our motherboard reviews. That even goes back to the HardOCP days. Largely, it’s dependent on the CPU and figuring out exactly what the motherboard does is a bit tricky. That said, power is the same as it was in the 10980XE review. 617w when overclocked.

    As for temperatures, I normally cover what the VRM heat sink reads at. An oversight on my part. These reviews are getting more complex and its easy to miss something like that. However, I did note it and the VRM heat sink was a mere 102F.
    [/QUOTE]
    Thank you Dan!

  7. [QUOTE=”Dan_D, post: 10052, member: 6″]
    It’s one of the nicest motherboards I’ve ever reviewed. That’s saying something given that I’ve been doing this for over 14 years.
    [/QUOTE]

    For the price I would be surprised if it were anything other than top notch.

    I can understand the history with Intel. Still odd that they chose this route, given that X299 is due to be overhauled… Then again, when all that’s on the horizon is Skylake ++++ and you aren’t jumping to PCI 4.0, I guess there is no real ~need~ to overhaul it (not that that has ever stopped Intel in the past).

  8. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 10066, member: 96″]
    For the price I would be surprised if it were anything other than top notch.

    I can understand the history with Intel. Still odd that they chose this route, given that X299 is due to be overhauled… Then again, when all that’s on the horizon is Skylake ++++ and you aren’t jumping to PCI 4.0, I guess there is no real ~need~ to overhaul it (not that that has ever stopped Intel in the past).
    [/QUOTE]

    For that price, you do expect a great board. However, GIGABYTE’s X58-UD9 was $700 back in the day and I hated it. It was one of the quirkiest boards I’d worked with at the time. As for Intel, they cycle through the mainstream chipsets too quickly and not fast enough on the HEDT side.

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