Image: Sony

Sony has launched a new streaming service called Bravia Core that supposedly boasts the same level of video quality that’s offered by physical formats such as Ultra HD Blu-ray. As the company explains in its press release, Bravia Core’s higher streaming quality is enabled by a special technology called Pure Stream, which allows for streaming bit rates as high as 80 Mbps. The service is exclusive to BRAVIA XR TVs such as the BRAVIA XR MASTER Series A90J (4K OLED) and Z9J (8K LED).

BRAVIA XR TV owners who sign up for BRAVIA CORE can redeem movies from a selection of at least 300 titles including Venom, Peter Rabbit, Ghostbusters, Blade Runner 2049 and Jumanji: The Next Level using BRAVIA CORE credits. There are 10 movie credits included with the A90J and Z9J televisions and 5 with the rest of the BRAVIA XR models. Also, with BRAVIA CORE sign up, BRAVIA XR TV owners are subscribed to a separate, amazing selection of movies to stream any time and as many times as they like, in up to 4K HDR quality.

Sources: Sony UK, FlatpanelsHD

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9 Comments

  1. Tying it to their TVs is pretty much the best way to make sure no one uses it.

    Like… I’m very, very careful about the Sony products I buy. I currently own exactly one: a set of headphones that I purchased from their unofficial (or so I read) refurbished store on Amazon. Regular analog headphones don’t have complicated ICs or firmware for Sony to find some backward way to dick up.

    I hear the processing on their TVs is pretty good; LG’s seems to have gone downhill a bit with the jump to 4k. Still though, I know I can set the LG up for low-latency, high-refresh input with adaptive sync, and so far as I’ve read that’s a no-go on Sony TVs. Till they get that all figured, they can keep their LG + US$1000 pricetags.

  2. 80 Mbps is about the average combined bitrate of a UHD Blu-ray, so I believe them. But they can f right off with locking it down to Sony televisions. I’m sure they would get a multitude more customers if they opened it up to everybody.
  3. Tying it to their TVs is pretty much the best way to make sure no one uses it.

    Like… I’m very, very careful about the Sony products I buy. I currently own exactly one: a set of headphones that I purchased from their unofficial (or so I read) refurbished store on Amazon. Regular analog headphones don’t have complicated ICs or firmware for Sony to find some backward way to dick up.

    I hear the processing on their TVs is pretty good; LG’s seems to have gone downhill a bit with the jump to 4k. Still though, I know I can set the LG up for low-latency, high-refresh input with adaptive sync, and so far as I’ve read that’s a no-go on Sony TVs. Till they get that all figured, they can keep their LG + US$1000 pricetags.

    Sony is ideal if you only care about Movies, TV Shows, Sports etc. Gaming they are lagging behind and LG is probably your best bet. If Sony could just fix the gaming aspect of their TV’s, they would dominate. It doesn’t even seem that difficult so I’m not sure why they can’t get their **** together.

  4. It doesn’t even seem that difficult so I’m not sure why they can’t get their **** together.

    There’s an Onion parody of the company that contemporaries can absolutely relate to.

    But as a photographer, it’s this simple:

    • Be a photographer
    • Try to set up any Sony camera except the very last two releases

    Manufacturers should not let computer scientists design user interfaces, and Sony is one of the worst when it comes to actually courting their market. For reasons inexplicable.

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