Test Setup

Please read our testing methodologies and benchmarks article for a background on our testing methods and benchmarks generally speaking.  Our CPU testing platform has evolved, and now contains the following hardware listed below.

System Setup Table

We are using an ASUS TUF GAMING X570-Plus Wi-Fi motherboard for testing, this is an AMD X570 chipset-based motherboard, with VRM cooling. We have reviewed the motherboard here. We are using BIOS version 4021 which is dated 8/17/2021 and is the latest BIOS at the time of testing. It uses AMD AM4 AGESA V2 PI 1.2.0.3 Patch C. The CPUs are being cooled by a 280mm AIO, the NZXT Kraken X63 on its Performance profile, and “Turbo” fan speeds.

For memory, we are using two 8GB sticks of G.SKILL Trident Z Neo 16GB total at 3600MHz with timings of 16-19-19-39-85-1T (CL-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tRC-CR). This frequency and timing are the same on both CPUs and D.O.C.P. is enabled.

We are also using the latest AMD Chipset Drivers version 3.09.01.140 dated 9/13/2021.

We have the Performance and Sleep slider set to Performance in Windows settings on the Ryzen 7 5800X, and for the Ryzen 7 3700X, we are utilizing the AMD Ryzen High-Performance power profile.

As stated earlier, we have enabled Precision Boost Override (PBO) for overclocking the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X CPU by +200MHz. This is indicated in our graphs with “PBO” on the title bar. The one without PBO is stock default operation with PBO disabled.

Ryzen 7 3700X

Ryzen 7 5800X

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Brent Justice

Brent Justice has been reviewing computer components for 20+ years, educated in the art and method of the computer hardware review he brings experience, knowledge, and hands-on testing with a gamer oriented...

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10 Comments

  1. I built 4 systems for people using the 3700X. I was really hoping there would be a 5700X. Or they could drop the price on the 5800X, that would work too. 3700X and 5800X are both good CPUs, but the superiority of Zen 3 really shines through. I wasn’t expecting an article like this, nice surprise, thanks Brent.

  2. I’m on a 5800x for my gaming PC. Very happy. I came from a 3800x. Which seems silly, but who cares. HAHA

  3. Cool to see a side by side between the two. I had considered upgrading to a 5800X, but think I’ll hold on to my 3700X for a couple more years. At 1440P the gaming difference is probably 2-5%, so it really doesn’t make sense.

    Curious, why was PBO not enabled for the 3700X?

  4. So basically for gaming at ultra / 4K it is worthless to upgrade, thanks for that, now my itch to replace my 3700x is completely gone.

  5. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 42250, member: 1298″]
    So basically for gaming at ultra / 4K it is worthless to upgrade, thanks for that, now my itch to replace my 3700x is completely gone.
    [/QUOTE]

    My thoughts exactly.

  6. It was a very nice incremental upgrade. The biggest benefits IMO were better RAM compatibility / higher RAM clocks, but the higher power envelope and clock speeds were nice.

    I wouldn’t see it as a necessary upgrading coming from Zen2+ either, but if you were on anything older (Haswell, for me), it was a very nice boost.

  7. I made the change from the 3700X to the 5800X and have enjoyed every single bit of improvements so far.

  8. [QUOTE=”MadMummy76, post: 42250, member: 1298″]
    So basically for gaming at ultra / 4K it is worthless to upgrade, thanks for that, now my itch to replace my 3700x is completely gone.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah.. That’s why I left my 3700X at home, and went with the upgrade for the work machine. I am noticing a good performance boost for my work applications for sure.

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