Synthetic Testing Continued

SiSoftware Sandra

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X SiSoftware Sandra

In our Sandra memory bandwidth test, the Ryzen 9 5900X falls well short of the Core i9 11900K despite the clock advantage. This doesn’t totally surprise me as Intel often does very well in such tests. For all intents and purposes, the 3900X and 5900X score is about the same here. However, there is an obvious improvement in increasing memory clocks which isn’t unusual.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X SiSoftware Sandra

In this test we see huge improvements increasing the multicore clocks on our 5900X over stock values. However, we also see substantial increases in performance between CPU generations. Frankly, the 8c/16t Intel Core i9 11900K doesn’t compete at all here.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X SiSoftware Sandra

Once again, we see a marked improvement going from the 3000 series to the 5000 series Ryzens. The Core i9 11900K is left in the dust so to speak as it doesn’t score anywhere near the aging Ryzen 9 3900X, which is far outclassed by the Ryzen 9 5900X at both stock and overclocked speeds.

AIDA64 CPU Queen

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X AIDA64

Again, and unsurprisingly, the Ryzen 9 5900X achieves the best scores here. The improvement over the 3900X is solid, but not earth-shattering. Again, the 11900K falls well behind the two AMD test systems.

wPrime

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X wPrime

In our wPrime test, the 3900X is actually the fastest CPU in our test lineup. Why? I honestly don’t know but the test was run several times and always achieved the same result. That being said, the difference is relatively small.

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6 Comments

  1. You’re missing (or mislabeled) the 3900x “Max” and “Min” on the first Ghost Recon Breakpoint chart.

    Also, though I hate to be a turd, but those FPS charts don’t work at all for me. I’d much rather see one line going across with the min, avg and max color coded on it. It makes things too unnecessarily busy when there’s a separate line for each. Again, just my opinion.

  2. [QUOTE=”Grimham, post: 44543, member: 169″]
    You’re missing (or mislabeled) the 3900x “Max” and “Min” on the first Ghost Recon Breakpoint chart.

    Also, though I hate to be a turd, but those FPS charts don’t work at all for me. I’d much rather see one line going across with the min, avg and max color coded on it. It makes things too unnecessarily busy when there’s a separate line for each. Again, just my opinion.
    [/QUOTE]
    Most likely mislabeled. The graph format will also be changing in the future for these.

  3. Thanks [USER=6]@Dan_D[/USER] , awesome article!

    I’m loving these comparison articles. For those of us with the older chips it’s nice to see what the real gains could be. I’m still going to hold onto my 3700x for a bit but that other article you did on it vs the [URL=’https://www.thefpsreview.com/2021/10/06/amd-ryzen-7-5800x-vs-ryzen-7-3700x-performance-review/’]5800x[/URL] was a bit of an eye opener.

  4. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 44610, member: 87″]
    Thanks [USER=6]@Dan_D[/USER] , awesome article!

    I’m loving these comparison articles. For those of us with the older chips it’s nice to see what the real gains could be. I’m still going to hold onto my 3700x for a bit but that other article you did on it vs the [URL=’https://www.thefpsreview.com/2021/10/06/amd-ryzen-7-5800x-vs-ryzen-7-3700x-performance-review/’]5800x[/URL] was a bit of an eye opener.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, the Ryzen 5000 series offers quite a bit over the 3000 series performance wise. Although, whether or not that’s enough to justify the price of an upgrade is debatable.

  5. Since this is a “now that Zen3 has been out for a while” type of article, was there any significant difference between performance upon initial release versus now when things have matured a bit?

  6. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 44618, member: 96″]
    Since this is a “now that Zen3 has been out for a while” type of article, was there any significant difference between performance upon initial release versus now when things have matured a bit?
    [/QUOTE]
    Unfortunately, that’s a question I can’t really answer. We didn’t have the 5900X until somewhat recently. The availability was so bad that we didn’t get sampled by AMD when these were released and we had to buy this CPU retail. And again, retail availability was horrible so it took us a really long time to get one.

    The answer should be “yes.” By how much? I couldn’t say unfortunately.

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