Conclusion

Overall, we can see solid improvement in the Ryzen 5000 over the earlier 3000 series. The Ryzen 9 5900X’s improvements are evident in most applications we saw. It’s been a year since the Ryzen 9 5900X was launched, and with new BIOS updaters, AGESA updates, and driver updates it is operating at its full potential today. This is a different context than it would have been a year ago.

AMD has done a wonderful job at removing some of the internal latencies that caused issues with the older generations of Ryzen processors in certain applications. Going to a higher core count CCDs is a godsend on that front. AMD claims a 19% performance uplift over previous generations. This was accomplished by unifying the CCX/CCD complexes and doubling the L3 cache over the earlier generation. On top of that, AMD did increase the base and boost clock speeds slightly over the previous generation.

Final Points

Ultimately, the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X is an excellent CPU with solid availability at this point. Its availability for a very long time was awful, with price gouging making them cost-prohibitive. Today, AMD has reduced the price of the 5000 series in order to make the series more enticing in light of recent releases. At present, the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X costs around $480 on Amazon.com.

The AMD Ryzen 9 5900X is certainly a bargain compared to its introductory price and represents a solid upgrade for anyone who already has an AM4 system. It’s a great upgrade from the Ryzen 9 3900X. And of course, you can still use the vastly cheaper and far more available DDR4 RAM with it. Additionally, if you are gaming at GPU limited resolutions, it may be a compelling option over Intel’s offerings as well given board maturity, memory prices, and ultimately, the similar performance you’d get going either direction.

Discussion

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6 Comments

  1. You’re missing (or mislabeled) the 3900x “Max” and “Min” on the first Ghost Recon Breakpoint chart.

    Also, though I hate to be a turd, but those FPS charts don’t work at all for me. I’d much rather see one line going across with the min, avg and max color coded on it. It makes things too unnecessarily busy when there’s a separate line for each. Again, just my opinion.

  2. [QUOTE=”Grimham, post: 44543, member: 169″]
    You’re missing (or mislabeled) the 3900x “Max” and “Min” on the first Ghost Recon Breakpoint chart.

    Also, though I hate to be a turd, but those FPS charts don’t work at all for me. I’d much rather see one line going across with the min, avg and max color coded on it. It makes things too unnecessarily busy when there’s a separate line for each. Again, just my opinion.
    [/QUOTE]
    Most likely mislabeled. The graph format will also be changing in the future for these.

  3. Thanks [USER=6]@Dan_D[/USER] , awesome article!

    I’m loving these comparison articles. For those of us with the older chips it’s nice to see what the real gains could be. I’m still going to hold onto my 3700x for a bit but that other article you did on it vs the [URL=’https://www.thefpsreview.com/2021/10/06/amd-ryzen-7-5800x-vs-ryzen-7-3700x-performance-review/’]5800x[/URL] was a bit of an eye opener.

  4. [QUOTE=”Peter_Brosdahl, post: 44610, member: 87″]
    Thanks [USER=6]@Dan_D[/USER] , awesome article!

    I’m loving these comparison articles. For those of us with the older chips it’s nice to see what the real gains could be. I’m still going to hold onto my 3700x for a bit but that other article you did on it vs the [URL=’https://www.thefpsreview.com/2021/10/06/amd-ryzen-7-5800x-vs-ryzen-7-3700x-performance-review/’]5800x[/URL] was a bit of an eye opener.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, the Ryzen 5000 series offers quite a bit over the 3000 series performance wise. Although, whether or not that’s enough to justify the price of an upgrade is debatable.

  5. Since this is a “now that Zen3 has been out for a while” type of article, was there any significant difference between performance upon initial release versus now when things have matured a bit?

  6. [QUOTE=”Brian_B, post: 44618, member: 96″]
    Since this is a “now that Zen3 has been out for a while” type of article, was there any significant difference between performance upon initial release versus now when things have matured a bit?
    [/QUOTE]
    Unfortunately, that’s a question I can’t really answer. We didn’t have the 5900X until somewhat recently. The availability was so bad that we didn’t get sampled by AMD when these were released and we had to buy this CPU retail. And again, retail availability was horrible so it took us a really long time to get one.

    The answer should be “yes.” By how much? I couldn’t say unfortunately.

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