Image: Corsair

Corsair has launched its new K70 RGB TKL Optical-Mechanical Gaming Keyboard, a new option for users who are seeking a keyboard with a tenkeyless design. The black-aluminum keyboard features the company’s OPX optical-mechanical keyswitches, which boast a short actuation distance of just 1.0 mm, a detachable USB Type-C cable, as well as an 8,000 Hz polling rate via AXON Hyper-Processing technology for greater performance. Corsair’s K70 RGB TKL Optical-Mechanical Gaming Keyboard is available now for $149.99 from its network of authorized retailers and distributors in select regions. The product is backed by a two-year warranty.

Image: Corsair

Built for Champions CORSAIR Launches K70 RGB TKL Optical-Mechanical Gaming Keyboard (Corsair)

CORSAIR (NASDAQ: CRSR), a world leader in high-performance gear for gamers and content creators, today unveiled a new optical-mechanical version of the award-winning K70 RGB TKL CHAMPION SERIES Gaming Keyboard. Featuring the acclaimed K70 RGB TKL tournament-ready tenkeyless design and stylish aluminum build, while adding hyper-fast CORSAIR OPX optical-mechanical keyswitches to its arsenal, the K70 RGB TKL Optical-Mechanical sets the bar higher still for esports-caliber gaming keyboards.

A new addition to the CHAMPION SERIES, CORSAIR OPX optical-mechanical keyswitches boast an incredibly short 1.0mm actuation distance to swiftly register inputs. Their smooth linear motion is apt for high-level competitive gaming, and each switch is guaranteed for an extraordinary 150 million keystrokes. These premier keyswitches are housed in the iconic K70 aluminum frame renowned for its durability and portability, thanks to a compact tenkeyless profile and a detachable USB Type-C cable that makes it a snap to take on-the-go and connect to any system. Sturdy PBT double-shot keycaps, precision-molded to resist wear and fading, keep your keys looking and feeling like new even after years of use.

The K70 RGB TKL Optical-Mechanical Gaming Keyboard epitomizes competition-level keyboard performance. CORSAIR AXON Hyper-Processing enables 8,000Hz hyper-polling, transmitting keystrokes up to 8x faster than standard gaming keyboards, so your commands register and reach your PC faster than ever before. To adhere with strict tournament guidelines, the innovative tournament switch located on the back of the keyboard instantly locks backlighting to a static color and disables macros to ensure your keyboard is prepped for battle.

Everything that makes the K70 RGB TKL a hit with competitive gamers is present in the new optical-mechanical version, including per-key RGB backlighting vastly customizable via CORSAIR iCUE software, dedicated media keys with a solid aluminum volume roller, and onboard storage for saving up to 50 profiles to take on the go. With CORSAIR OPX keyswitches sending inputs to your PC quickly and reliably, the K70 RGB TKL Optical-Mechanical keyboard is built for champions like you.

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8 comments

  1. What is the deal with the elimination of 10 key?
    Yeah, what gives? I like the 10-key

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    Also, I would like to note, a typical number pad is actually 17 keys ><
  2. What is the deal with the elimination of 10 key?
    So, basically - ergonomics. Especially for gaming, with the typical WASD + mouse setup, which keeps your forearms straight.

    Yeah, what gives? I like the 10-key
    I keep a separate numpad, typically on the right side of my mouse. But before that, practicing on laptops that lack a numpad, those being all the nice ones, made the transition less painful than it would have been.
  3. I really don't understand who tenkeyless keyboards are for. I guess the keyboards are more portable, which is handy if you carry it around with a laptop or something. It doesn't even really save that much desk space, and if it does for you, then you got bigger problems with the available space on your desk. I have a keyboard tray, and while the numpad area does overlap the mouse pad, it barely makes a difference, and doesn't interfere with my mouse usage.

    So, basically - ergonomics. Especially for gaming, with the typical WASD + mouse setup, which keeps your forearms straight.
    When I game, my forearms are straight using my full-size K70 and mouse. Each arm and elbow rests on an armrest of my chair. The left arm goes straight to where WASD is, and the right arm goes straight to the mouse. I don't see how this would change if I didn't have the numpad area of my keyboard.

    I keep a separate numpad, typically on the right side of my mouse.
    Ah, that's pretty cool. So at least you still have a numpad solution. Does it wire into the keyboard, or directly to the PC? If the latter, does it show up as a separate device on your PC? I don't think I am familiar with the practice of using a separate numpad.

    You keep it on the right side of your mouse huh? Interesting. That wouldn't work for my keyboard tray, cuz it would change the mouse's position to no longer be in an ideal place for my right hand/arm.

    But before that, practicing on laptops that lack a numpad, those being all the nice ones, made the transition less painful than it would have been.
    I can't even stand laptop keyboards as it is, ones without numpads just piss me off all the more.


    Also, I would like to note, a typical number pad is actually 17 keys ><
    Haha yeah. I never understood the naming either.
  4. Of course it's 250 bucks.
    GOOD GAWD. And I thought $100 for a keyboard was absolutely insane. I got my K70 as a gift, but before that I probably never spent more than $20 on a keyboard. Actually that may not be true, cuz I used to have a Logitech G15 (original version). I don't remember what those things cost when new. I got mine in the mid-2000s when I built my dual-core overclocked Opteron165 system on an nForce 4 board. I don't recall which crapped out first, the G15's backlighting or the screen, but those things didn't last.
  5. GOOD GAWD. And I thought $100 for a keyboard was absolutely insane. I got my K70 as a gift, but before that I probably never spent more than $20 on a keyboard. Actually that may not be true, cuz I used to have a Logitech G15 (original version). I don't remember what those things cost when new. I got mine in the mid-2000s when I built my dual-core overclocked Opteron165 system on an nForce 4 board. I don't recall which crapped out first, the G15's backlighting or the screen, but those things didn't last.
    Actually have an original orange-backlit G15 that I need to refurbish someday. Still works, mostly! But the screen absolutely still works with say HWINFO64 for showing system statistics, if coarsely.

    As for keyboard pricing... wait until you hear about custom keyboards, bespoke keycaps, switches, and various customizations folks do. I'm typing on a keyboard with switches that we (wife and myself) lubed that we also installed a foam pad into to dampen some of the noise.

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