Image: NVIDIA

NVIDIA released a revised assortment of GeForce RTX 30 Series graphics cards last year with a reduced hash rate in an attempt to increase their availability for gamers and other general enthusiasts, but these so-called Lite Hash Rate (LHR) GPUs have now been fully unlocked for anyone who wishes to maximize their potential for mining cryptocurrency. This has been made possible by the folks at NiceHash, who have presented new software today that fully unlocks NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 30 Series LHR cards, which include the GeForce RTX 3080, RTX 3070, and RTX 3060 Ti. The software is called QuickerMiner (Excavator) and can be found here.

Image: NiceHash

The LHR cards were meant to lower the performance of NVIDIA RTX 30 cards for Ethereum and other alternative cryptocoins mining with GPUs by up to 50%. Interestingly, the NVIDIA LHR algorithm was first unlocked by NVIDIA themselves, after the company accidentally published the non-LHR driver. NVIDIA quickly has patched LHR algorithm and released a second version of its RTX 3060 GPU. Since then, all RTX 30 cards have shifted to LHR variants, with an exception to RTX 3090 series.

Source: NiceHash (via VideoCardz)

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4 comments

  1. The only thing surprising about this is how long it took.
    I think it was you that had mentioned before -- if someone had cracked it earlier, they weren't likely to leak it to the general public; they'd keep it in house to take better advantage of it.

    Seems that could very well have been the case here - it didn't leak out until there really wasn't a huge need for it anymore. I think it's more likely it was developed a year or more ago, and has been in use by some large mining front; just kept hidden behind closed doors.
  2. I think it was you that had mentioned before -- if someone had cracked it earlier, they weren't likely to leak it to the general public; they'd keep it in house to take better advantage of it.

    Seems that could very well have been the case here - it didn't leak out until there really wasn't a huge need for it anymore. I think it's more likely it was developed a year or more ago, and has been in use by some large mining front; just kept hidden behind closed doors.
    That is very true.

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