Transient Testing

For those of you that are curious as to some of the reasoning and equipment behind our PSU testing program here at TheFPSReview, we have put together an introduction for you that shares a lot of the behind the scenes of the program. This program is based on what the author developed at [H]ardOCP and utilizes the equipment bequeathed to the author by Kyle Bennett. The testing we are conducting today is exactly as described in that document and will continue with our Transient Testing.

Transient Test 1

Loaded/Unloaded

12v/5v

Test #1 is equal to approximately 25% of the rated capacity of the SilverStone NJ700 at 45c. This makes Test #1 equal to 185W by loading the 12v rail to 13a, the 5v rail to 2a, the 3.3v rail to 1a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.3a before the addition of the transient load. The results of Test #1 show a ~330mV drop on the 12v rail and ~50mV drop on the 5v rail when each is directly loaded. At the same time that the load was being triggered on the 12v rail, the 5v rail measured a ~40mV drop.

Transient Test 2

Loaded/Unloaded

12v/5v

Test #2 is equal to approximately 50% of the rated capacity of the SilverStone NJ700 at 45c. This makes Test #2 equal to 327W by loading the 12v rail to 24a, the 5v rail to 3a, the 3.3v rail to 2a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.3a before the addition of the transient load. The results of Test #2 show a ~340mV drop on the 12v rail and ~100mV drop on the 5v rail when each is directly loaded. At the same time that the load was being triggered on the 12v rail, the 5v rail measured a ~50mV drop.

Transient Load Testing Summary

The Transient Load Tests results for the SilverStone NJ700 are passing and generally good. In today’s testing, the NJ700 saw the loaded 12v rail post a peak change of ~340mV, and the loaded 5v rail post a peak change of ~100mV. The unloaded 5v peak change during the 12v load was ~50mV. Those numbers are, in an absolute sense, decent to generally good. In a relative sense, when we consider that this unit is a fanless product, they are good as well. Indeed, they were mixed with the Antec NEO ECO GOLD ZEN 700W and Cougar BXM 700. Let’s move on now to see how this unit does in the DC Output Quality aspect of our testing!

Paul Johnson

Paul is a long time PC hobbyist and tech enthusiast having gotten his start when he broke his first C64 quickly followed by breaking his first IBM XT. Most notably however, for 12 years, he served as the...

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14 Comments

  1. Good review. I think for me, once you mention Seasonic the rest is pretty well known. I hope they keep it up and other OEMs take note.
  2. WHATS OPP ON THIS? :ROFLMAO:


    Batman-Slapping-Robin-Meme-Explained.jpg

    I don’t want to have to get the load tester repaired any more than neccesary.

  3. haha I’m just busting chops.

    I gotcha. But, destructive testing of a power supply results in unexpected events. Each time I have to get the load tester repaired and recalibrated and certified it starts a $2k. So, not something I like to do.

  4. I gotcha. But, destructive testing of a power supply results in unexpected events. Each time I have to get the load tester repaired and recalibrated and certified it starts a $2k. So, not something I like to do.

    Well, in my opinion, OPP testing should not be destructive. Unless the PSU is malfunctioning or you just really wanted it to be and juiced it hard (like 480V 3p).

    Hitting a PSU with some overload, 125-150%, shouldn’t cause it to explode and should gracefully trigger OPP. Most of our industrial tests are to 150% of rated.

  5. Well, in my opinion, OPP testing should not be destructive. Unless the PSU is malfunctioning or you just really wanted it to be and juiced it hard (like 480V 3p).

    Hitting a PSU with some overload, 125-150%, shouldn’t cause it to explode and should gracefully trigger OPP. Most of our industrial tests are to 150% of rated.

    But, like I said before, there is not a spec. And without some sort of definition we have no idea where it is and where a catastrophic load will happen. So, until it is defined somewhere we can’t do a legitimate test for it.

  6. But, like I said before, there is not a spec. And without some sort of definition we have no idea where it is and where a catastrophic load will happen. So, until it is defined somewhere we can’t do a legitimate test for it.

    Ask the manufacturer, if they advertise the feature, it has a setpoint.

    That, or treat it like overclocking and just step it up slowly.

  7. Ask the manufacturer, if they advertise the feature, it has a setpoint.

    That, or treat it like overclocking and just step it up slowly.

    This is on the list of expensive things I’d like to see.

    Just note that they’re expensive, and as @Paul_Johnson notes above, prohibitively so.

    I’ll also say for the sake of perspective – while you want to know how a PSU behaves close to its limit, that’s your ‘reserve’. You’d usually want to leave say a 20% or more bit of ‘on paper’ headroom. Base your estimates on how hard you want to push the system and what components you expect, and add up the power draw, then leave some headroom above that.

    If you’re pushing a PSU close to its limit, you’ve made a.. miscalculation somewhere along the line :).

  8. Ask the manufacturer, if they advertise the feature, it has a setpoint.

    That, or treat it like overclocking and just step it up slowly.

    Well see, that is the problem. Most of the "manufacturers" are not manufacturers and don’t know (though SilverStone is not one of those that does not know). Also, I would have to have not just what they set it to but how they designed the protection. Then write a specific test for each and every unit that caters to their exact design. That means there would be no standardization to be able to compare units to. And without some sort of standardized definition we have no idea where a catastrophic load will happen. So, until it is defined somewhere we can’t do a legitimate test for it.

  9. What? You don’t like ground dwelling birds for your power supplies?

    Birds wouldn’t have been my first choice, but knowing that it is a bird name makes a lot more sense than some sort of jar one uses at night.

    My mind was drawn in the direction of chamber pots!

  10. My mind was drawn in the direction of chamber pots!

    Somehow – I blame Hunger Games – the name pattern sounded like a bird name. But like so many other names that are nominally English coming from countries where it isn’t a first language, I pretty much just accept stuff as it comes. I read plenty a pre-2000 motherboard manual too.

    So ‘chamber pot’ is fair game, IMO!

    On the other hand, with Gigabyte’s fiery ordeal still shaking out and questions on how such occurrences might be prevented, the ‘fanless’ nature of this Silverstone unit just now caught my eye.

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