Image: AMD

It doesn’t appear as if AMD plans on selling consumer-oriented (e.g., non-PRO) versions of its Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5000 WX-Series processors any time soon, but SkatterBencher, a YouTuber and extreme overclocker, has provided a glimpse at the overclocking potential that enthusiasts might expect in the flagship model if it were to ultimately surface.

As documented in the extensive and in-depth video below, SkatterBencher was able to overclock an engineering sample of AMD’s unreleased Ryzen Threadripper 5990X chip to 4.82 GHz across all of its 64 cores—an impressive feat that was achieved with a combination of PBO tuning, use of AMD’s Curve Optimizer, and, most effectively, manual overclocking.

One chart shared by SkatterBencher reveals a 50% gain in the AI Benchmark, 58% gain in Cinebench R23, and more than an 80% performance uplift in 3DMark’s CPU Profile benchmark versus stock. The overclocked Ryzen Threadripper 5990X was also able to hit 100,000 points in Cinebench R23, a new record, with the package power reaching a maximum of 691 watts.

An AMD representative has clarified that its Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5000 WX-Series processors are unlocked for overclocking following some coverage that suggested otherwise. A blog post that AMD shared last month can also confirm that select WRX80 motherboards from its ODM partners will support “both memory and CPU overclocking for users looking to push the limits of their workstation even further.”

AMD officially announced its Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5000 WX-Series processors in March. The family is headlined by the Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5995WX, a 64C/128T chip that features a boot/base frequency of up to 4.5/2.7 GHz, total cache of 288 MB, support for up to 128 PCIe 4.0 lanes, and a TDP of 280 watts. They will be available to the DIY community “later this year.”

Image: SkatterBencher

In today’s video, we overclock the unreleased AMD Ryzen Threadripper 5990X 64-core processor up to 4825 MHz with the ASUS ROG Zenith II Extreme Alpha motherboard and EK-Quantum custom loop water cooling.

To be more precise, though, we’re overclocking an early engineering sample CPU that we assume was supposed to end up being the successor to the Ryzen Threadripper 3990X. But as you undoubtedly know, AMD did not end up releasing the consumer versions of the Zen 3 Threadripper processors.

Since this is an early engineering sample of an unreleased CPU, I’ll try to cover the overclocking challenges as comprehensively as possible. This is undoubtedly the most powerful system I’ve ever laid my hands on, so I hope you enjoy the video!

Source: SkatterBencher (via Tom’s Hardware, Wccftech)

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