Patriot Viper Venom RGB DDR5 32GB (2x16GB) 6200MHz Memory Kit banner image

Introduction

Viper is a gaming brand established in 2007 by Patriot Memory which has been in business since 1985 producing high-performance memory modules, flash memory, mobile accessories, and gaming equipment. The brand targets the eSports, Gaming, and Entertainment audiences by producing products that perform well and often look good while doing so.

The specific kit that we are looking at today is the Viper Venom RGB DDR5 32GB (2x16GB) 6200MHz Memory Kit which stands at the top of Viper’s DDR 5 offerings with 32GB RGB kits also being offered at 6000MHz and 5600MHz. Patriot also offers the 32GB kits in a non-RGB flavor as well as 16GB (2x8GB) kits at 5600MHz and 5200MHz. At the time of publication, the Viper Venom RGB DDR5 32GB (2x16GB) 6200MHz was seen for about $260 in the e-tail wilderness.

Viper Venom RGB DDR5 32GB (2x16GB) 6200MHz Memory

The Viper Venom RGB DDR5 32GB (2x16GB) 6200MHz Memory comes in a box that shows off the RGB capabilities of the memory and has a sticker affixed to the front indicating the 32GB size, 2x16GB kit, PC5-49600 / 6200MHz. It also indicates that 16.8 million RGB colors are available for illumination. Flipping the box over, we see in several languages that the kit is XMP 3.0 Ready and carries a limited lifetime warranty. Viper also spells out a number of its social media handles in case you want to follow their cause (Ed: Did they still have their G+ handle listed?).

Inside the packaging, we found two 16GB modules labeled with the part number PVVR532G620C40K. The modules are clad in a black heat spreader which is accented by the Viper brand logo on a silver backing and the Viper logo located on the opposite side. The top of the memory is a translucent white color with the Viper brand name in red along the top.

The kits sport Hynix memory modules that have base timings of PC5-38400 (4800MHz) at 40-40-40-77 using 1.1V. Their tested (and marketed) frequency is PC5-49600 (6200MHz) at timings of 40-40-40-76 at 1.35V. They are equipped with a thermal sensor, on-die ECC, and support for RGB Sync with ASUS, ASRock, MSI, and GIGABYTE motherboards.

From a sizing perspective, the Viper Venom RGB DDR5 32GB (2x16GB) 6200MHz Memory measures in at 1.75” in height, which is shorter than the Corsair Dominator series that we’ve been working with on the test bench (that weights in at 2.25”). If you’re going with a large tower air cooler, these modules will give you a bit more clearance than other larger modules.

Installation and Configuration

We installed the Viper Venom RGB DDR5 32GB (2x16GB) 6200MHz Memory into our MSI MEG Z690 UNIFY motherboard that is paired with a 12900K processor. The RGB entered a default pattern that paired with the other RGB bling on our test rig.

By default, the modules load up the base timings described above which is PC5-38400 (4800MHz) at 40-40-40-77, but throwing the XMP switch bumped it up to PC5-49600 (6200MHz) at timings of 40-40-40-76. We were able to boot into Windows 11 and start benchmarking without an issue.

Viper RGB Software

Viper publishes a Viper RGB Software application that can control the RGB functionality of the memory. It has an RGB color selector for each of the LEDs that are installed in the kit, you can apply the settings to all sticks of memory or to specific sticks, as well as select the lighting effect that you want. All in all, it’s a fairly routine RGB app setup, though, Viper does warn it could conflict with other RGB programs that may also try to control the looks of your memory.

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David Schroth

David is a computer hardware enthusiast that has been tinkering with computer hardware for the past 25 years.

5 comments

  1. Ohhhh.. DDR5 reviews... Just in time for gaining knowledge on what to get when AM5 / Zen4 stuff starts rolling out. I've been reading that CL isn't the end-all-be-all value to OC on with DDR5. CL40 is faster than CL36, as the frequency gains (6200 @ CL40 vs 5600 @ CL36) outweigh the latency.

    Buildzoid has a great video on the subject:
  2. CL40 is faster than CL36, as the frequency gains (6200 @ CL40 vs 5600 @ CL36) outweigh the latency.
    BuildZoid's video certainly is informative, and it's also important to mention that it's not just the frequency gains, but also being able to tighten all of the timings that come after the '6200-40-40-40' primaries.

    It's also worth mentioning that DDR5 is currently very strongly stratified by manufacturer, and if looking to push performance, out of Micron, Samsung, and Hynix, one should try to find modules with Hynix DRAM ICs if at all possible. Additionally, I'd recommend paying attention to module cooling if pushing performance as well!
  3. Ohhhh.. DDR5 reviews... Just in time for gaining knowledge on what to get when AM5 / Zen4 stuff starts rolling out. I've been reading that CL isn't the end-all-be-all value to OC on with DDR5. CL40 is faster than CL36, as the frequency gains (6200 @ CL40 vs 5600 @ CL36) outweigh the latency.
    Well, as with prior generations, Intel vs AMD platform architecture will probably make a difference here in performance. If you go back to the DDR1 days looking at the Athlon vs P4 Northwoods, the former cared a LOT about latency while the latter did not. Thus, I wouldn't extrapolate the observed performance generalities on Alder Lake to Zen4 until testing is done.
  4. Thus, I wouldn't extrapolate the observed performance generalities on Alder Lake to Zen4 until testing is done.
    My extrapolation is: it depends on how much L3 cache is available and how well it's implemented. DDR5 in it's best implementations is already "I win" levels of performance.
  5. I just wanted to support Space_Ranger's suggestion of watching the Buildzoid video. I watched it when it came out, very informative. The general rule of thumb with DDR5 moving forward is going to be for more MT/s, but as David suggested, how much these things affect Intel vs AMD platform can be different.

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