DeepCool PQ850M

Today, we are looking at a product from a somewhat less well-known company, in North America, in the PC enthusiast realm; Beijing DEEPCOOL Industries Co., Ltd. DEEPCOOL is a Chinese company founded in 1996 that has generally been known for its line of air coolers, all-in-one liquid coolers, cooling fans, computer cases, and power supplies. Today, however, it is the power supply side of the house at DEEPCOOL that we are most interested in given their lower profile here in North America. The unit we are looking at as our first DEEPCOOL branded power supply is the PQ850M produced by Seasonic.

Seasonic is one of the older companies producing consumer power supplies having been founded in 1975 and entering the PC power supply production market in 1980. During more than 40 years as a company, Seasonic has cultivated lines of power supplies that are today some of the standard-bearers for efficiency and quiet computing. This focus, and its reputation for quality, has led to an explosion in production as Seasonic can be found providing OEM services on various model lines for Antec, XFX, Corsair, PC Power and Cooling, and of course under its own Seasonic brand.

PQ850M product image

Keeping It Cool, Deep Cool

The DeepCool PQ850M is the first power supply we have seen from DeepCool. As it sits today, this unit is clocking today at 850W which is an interesting number. As lots of people have noticed during the last couple of years, supplies of various electronics parts have been very constrained. As such, we have not seen a lot of power supplies much larger in capacity than this and, in fact, we have a whole bunch in this range coming online for review as this seems to be the “sweet” spot for high-capacity units at the moment. So, in that sense, DeepCool is going to have to do a bang-up job today to stand out from what is about to become a very crowded field. Before moving, let’s see what DeepCool has to say about the PQ850M:

Introducing a new generation of power reliability, the DeepCool PQ-M Series 80 PLUS Gold Modular Power Supply delivers high efficiency and stability for performance PC systems needing ultra-quiet operation with silent fan modes.

In our dedication to the mission of self-improvement and higher quality standards, the PQ-M Series PSU is a commitment from DeepCool to provide a trustworthy and reliable power supply. With a strong and dependable foundation, DeepCool is helping build better systems today that meet the expectations of tomorrow.

Carefully constructed throughout with quality components to ensure pristine power output quality. The modular board is hard connected to the circuit platform instead of traditional cables for added rigidity and less signal noise.

A fine-tuned silent fan curve helps produce a perfect balance between cooling and silence, with an additional fan stop option during low-temperature conditions. A rear fan control button also allows the option for setting a minimum fan speed when fanless mode is not preferred.

Fluid Dynamic Bearing (FDB) fans are considered the best-in-class for operating noise and life expectancy compared to other fan bearing types. The hydrodynamic and fluid-based properties greatly reduce friction and vibration which enables better reliability and quiet operation.

Let’s move on now and see what we can expect when a user purchases the DeepCool PQ850M power supply in retail in terms of documentation, accessories, cable count, rail layout, output characteristics, and general build quality.

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Paul Johnson

Paul is a long time PC hobbyist and tech enthusiast having gotten his start when he broke his first C64 quickly followed by breaking his first IBM XT. Most notably however, for 12 years, he served as the...

6 comments

  1. That, my friends, is where this unit runs headlong into a house while speedballed out of their mind like Anne Heche in an Austin Mini.

    **** that’s cold. Hilarious, but the dirt hasn’t even settled on the grave yet.
  2. That, my friends, is where this unit runs headlong into a house while speedballed out of their mind like Anne Heche in an Austin Mini.

    **** that’s cold. Hilarious, but the dirt hasn’t even settled on the grave yet.
    Some times the inspiration just slams right into you.
  3. I find this interesting and if I were in the market for a 850 watt power supply I would want platinum or titanium rated personally. Getting every ounce of efficiency will be critical with new modern parts at least in my mind.
  4. I find this interesting and if I were in the market for a 850 watt power supply I would want platinum or titanium rated personally. Getting every ounce of efficiency will be critical with new modern parts at least in my mind.
    Hmm, I don't know that the effiency matters much.

    The wattage is based on DC side - so an 850 Titanium will deliver the same 850W that a 850 Bronze will -- they will be identical as far as the computer load you can throw on them goes.

    Granted, the bronze would pull a bit more from the wall... but it's only a difference of 8% (82% vs 90%) - or 80W... at 85%.

    And if you have no qualms about a 500W+ Graphics card or 250W+ CPU (Not saying you personally Grim, just the general "making a point") -- then that extra 8% is nothing. Maybe if you are rocking one of those 1500W+ PSUs, and then that extra 8% may be the difference between throwing a breaker or not - and that would be a legitimate reason for a gamer or home computer user to care.

    Buy a power supply for the voltage quality, the warranty, the bells and whistles that you like -- but the Plus rating is mostly just a marketing badge. It might matter in a server situation where it's going to sit under load for long stretches of time (like 24x7), or maybe if you are mining full time, but it needs to be on at a healthy load for a long time if you ever want to recoup that price difference.



    I'll grant you that higher tier PSUs tend to be better units, but it isn't because they are higher tier rated. The tier rating is a good reason for the manufacturer to put a higher markup on a product, but you shouldn't pay extra for just that. Pay extra for stuff that matters, like good voltage quality or cable management or 10 year warranty. It's a shame that stuff is hard to sleuth out if all you have is the box on the shelf to go by - which is why I love sites like this one.
  5. Hmm, I don't know that the effiency matters much.

    The wattage is based on DC side - so an 850 Titanium will deliver the same 850W that a 850 Bronze will -- they will be identical as far as the computer load you can throw on them goes.

    Granted, the bronze would pull a bit more from the wall... but it's only a difference of 8% (82% vs 90%) - or 80W... at 85%.

    And if you have no qualms about a 500W+ Graphics card or 250W+ CPU (Not saying you personally Grim, just the general "making a point") -- then that extra 8% is nothing. Maybe if you are rocking one of those 1500W+ PSUs, and then that extra 8% may be the difference between throwing a breaker or not - and that would be a legitimate reason for a gamer or home computer user to care.

    Buy a power supply for the voltage quality, the warranty, the bells and whistles that you like -- but the Plus rating is mostly just a marketing badge. It might matter in a server situation where it's going to sit under load for long stretches of time (like 24x7), or maybe if you are mining full time, but it needs to be on at a healthy load for a long time if you ever want to recoup that price difference.



    I'll grant you that higher tier PSUs tend to be better units, but it isn't because they are higher tier rated. The tier rating is a good reason for the manufacturer to put a higher markup on a product, but you shouldn't pay extra for just that. Pay extra for stuff that matters, like good voltage quality or cable management or 10 year warranty. It's a shame that stuff is hard to sleuth out if all you have is the box on the shelf to go by - which is why I love sites like this one.


    I agree with everything you said. I consider warrranty and reputation as well. When I got my 1300 watt I wanted high efficiency. I didn't even realize titanium rated was a thing or I would have looked for it. (hard to find mind you.) And I know I over paid for my power supply but for me that piece out lives dang near every other component of my system. My old 850 watt that ran my 3900x is being given to a friend with the 3900x cpu and motherboard and the 1 tb nvme drive I had in it to boot. so it will see more life.

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