FSP CMT520 Plus Case I/O Panel

Introduction

Today we will be reviewing the FSP CMT520 Plus E-ATX Mid Tower PC Gaming Case (CMT520 Plus.) This is a case with two translucent tempered glass panels. One on the front of the case and one on the side panel. The retail price for this case is $129.99 direct from FSP Group. You get a 2-year warranty with this case. You can even find it cheaper at certain online stores at the time of writing. We’ll put those links for you in the conclusion.

FSP Group has been building computer components since the early 90s where they’ve mostly focused on Power Supplies. They’ve started building gaming cases for the e-sports and advanced gaming crowd as far back as 2018.

We have the CMT520 Plus to review today, but note that there is also a CMT520 without the “Plus.” So what makes ours a “Plus?” The Plus model is simply an upgrade from the original CMT520. It upgrades RGB. It has improved LED effects and 4 pre-installed addressable RGB fans. It supports MSI Mystic Light Sync and ASUS AURA Sync. It also has a higher MSRP: 129.99 versus the original CMT520 at $114.99. Thankfully, current online prices have dropped on the CMT520 Plus, while the original CMT520 is now out of stock.

Unboxing

FSP Group did a great job of packing this case up as you can see. The marketing department put all the needed info on the box so anyone looking at the box on a retail shelf will have a very good idea of what they are buying.

Tempered Glass Panel

First thing I noticed when pulling this case out of the protective box. The glass panel on this takes up the entire side panel. Something that’s becoming a little more common these days with side panel cases. However, FSP Group did something a little different with the mounting part compared to the CORSAIR 4000D Tempered Glass Case we reviewed a couple of months ago. More on that later.

Front I/O Panel

The top of the case, along with its front control panel looks really good. As you can see in the first picture the front control panel has plenty of ports. 2 USB 2.0 Ports on the left followed by a mic and headset plugins. The power button is in the center of the control panel with the reset button just to the right of it. Then you’ve got a LED button for controlling the RGB lights in the case, more on that later. On the right of the LED button, you’ve got 2 USB 3.0 ports.

This case does not have any USB Type-C ports available. That’s our one negative here, being a “Plus” model with updates we would have liked to have seen a Type-C port.

The top has a magnetic dust filter that you can easily remove to clean.

Front Panel

The front of the case is spectacular. It’s got a tempered glass front so you can see the 3 included 120mm ARGB Fans. The front panel is removable. Although getting all the necessary cables for the front I/O panel is a bit cumbersome.

Motherboard Tray

The motherboard tray area has a lot of open space. It can support up to a monster-sized E-ATX motherboard and all the sizes below that including ATX, Micro ATX, and ITX boards. Here you can see mounts for 2 SSDS. Not a lot of cable shrouds for hiding cables, but there are plenty of portholes around the motherboard mounting location to keep most of the cables hidden on the other side.

PSU Compartment

Here we have the PSU compartment. There is a removable tray that rests on top of this compartment that’s made of translucent plastic. As you can see in the first picture the one I was given has a slight bow in the middle. Nothing is preventing it from laying flat.

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5 Comments

  1. This appears identical to the Rosewill Cullinan v500 that goes for $80, and the internals are extremely similar to the Lian Li Lancool 2 Mesh, which is going for about $100-$125
  2. At that price point too, I’d expect to see a USB Type C connector on the front too, instead of 2 USB2 and 2 USB3.0 connectors..
  3. At that price point too, I’d expect to see a USB Type C connector on the front too, instead of 2 USB2 and 2 USB3.0 connectors..

    The Lian Li version has 1 USB C in lieu of the 2x 3.0 connectors, but it isn’t hooked up to anything internally, it’s just a cutout for the jack – so I don’t know what adapter it needs or where it hooked up on a motherboard. In my build right now it’s just a USB-C shaped hole in the control panel until I figure it out.

    The Lancool tempered glass panels are also all hinged on magentic latches – really nice, no screws, the panels don’t have to come off if you don’t want to, but the glass only covers the motherboard area, the lower PSU compartment has a steel (also magnetic latch) cover. The thumbscrews on this FSP unit and the Rosewill aren’t bad though – miles better than the old catches, the glass is full height of the case and they don’t look half bad.

    Also, the Rosewill has a fan speed control switch (if you decided to use it – I bypassed it and took the fans straight to motherboard headers and ramp them from there). The Lian Li has some RGB control buttons for an internal RGB controller that work the LEDs on the front panel fans, if you don’t hook them up to a RGB control header.

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