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Introduction

This is a quick and dirty performance-oriented article looking at Godfall’s FSR and Ray Tracing performance between a Radeon RX 6900 XT and GeForce RTX 3090. We are not going to look at image quality or talk about that. We are going to focus on the performance benefit that FSR (AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution) provides in Godfall on these two GPUs. We are also going to enable Ray Tracing in the mix to see how that performance with and without FSR.

Godfall is an action role-playing game developed by Counterplay Games and published by Gearbox Publishing and was released on November 12th of 2020. This game runs on the Unreal Engine 4. As of November 18th, 2020 a patch was released, patch 2.0.95 update which brought Ray Tracing support to Radeon RX 6000 series GPUs. It wasn’t until February of 2021 that Godfall received the “Primal” update patch 2.4.44 that enabled ray tracing for NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20 Series and RTX 30 Series graphics cards. Finally, in June of 2021 AMD’s FidelityFX Super Resolution (FSR) became available for Godfall.

AMD FSR is AMD’s spatial upscaler upsampling method for taking a lower-resolution image and upsampling. The goal of FSR is to improve performance at high resolutions, and with features like Ray Tracing turned on. It will allow features like Ray Tracing to be playable at higher resolutions and will allow high resolutions like 4K to be playable at higher settings. It should also allow lower-end video cards to extend their life by allowing games to continue to be playable. One benefit of FSR is that it is GPU agnostic, it will work on AMD and NVIDIA (and Intel) GPUs. Therefore, in our article today we can run it on both video cards.

Godfall AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution FSR

In Godfall’s graphics settings options, the first thing to set is the Quality Preset of the game. The game supports: Low, Medium, High and Epic quality preset. Epic Quality is the highest image quality in the game. Ray Tracing toggle can be found at the bottom, and it can be turned on or off. AMD FidelityFX LPM is used with HDR if you are using HDR.

To enable FSR the toggle you are looking for is called AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution. The highest quality setting is “UltraQuality”, then below that is “Quality” and then “Balanced” and then “Performance.” Each setting will increase performance, but also lower image quality. You can have FSR enable with Ray Tracing turned on.

Brent Justice

Brent Justice has been reviewing computer components for 20+ years, educated in the art and method of the computer hardware review he brings experience, knowledge, and hands-on testing with a gamer oriented...

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10 Comments

  1. An IQ comparison would’ve been nice.

    Follow up article maybe?

    Never say never.

    But this article was focused on the performance aspect. Naturally, anything that isn’t the native resolution will be of a lower quality, it just depends by how much of a downgrade in quality, and if it’s noticeable. You enter into FSR knowing the potential of a downgrade in image quality. The point and goal of enabling FSR is to increase performance. That’s the only reason you enable it.

  2. Never say never.

    But this article was focused on the performance aspect. Naturally, anything that isn’t the native resolution will be of a lower quality, it just depends by how much of a downgrade in quality, and if it’s noticeable. You enter into FSR knowing the potential of a downgrade in image quality. The point and goal of enabling FSR is to increase performance. That’s the only reason you enable it.

    I agree for the most part, thing is all upscaling technologies promise high performance gains vs "minimal" IQ drop. So it would be nice to know to what extent the promise is delivered.

    For better or for worse upscaling is here to stay, everyone and thier mother in law are coming up with their own version be it hardware (DLSS, xeSS) or software (FSR, UE5). It will be interesting to see how they all stack up.

  3. The 6900xt did better than expected. This title might just be an anomaly in that regard though. Who knows.

    The standout to me is that at 4K with RT and high quality FSR/DLSS settings, both cards achieve completely playable framerates.

    Never say never.

    But this article was focused on the performance aspect. Naturally, anything that isn’t the native resolution will be of a lower quality, it just depends by how much of a downgrade in quality, and if it’s noticeable. You enter into FSR knowing the potential of a downgrade in image quality. The point and goal of enabling FSR is to increase performance. That’s the only reason you enable it.

    I’m interested in seeing this as well.

    I’ve never seen either FSR or DLSS in person, but when DLSS 2.0 was launched, some reviews were suggesting that it was a tradeoff in image quality, and that in some ways it could actually look better/sharper than native.

  4. I’ve never seen either FSR or DLSS in person, but when DLSS 2.0 was launched, some reviews were suggesting that it was a tradeoff in image quality, and that in some ways it could actually look better/sharper than native.

    That’s never been my experience with it. Granted, Cyberpunk 2077 is the only place I need DLSS 2.0 using my RTX 3090. It’s also the only game I play that has ray tracing implemented to a degree that impacts performance negatively to a point where DLSS 2.0 is required to get desirable frame rates.

    In that game, image quality definitely suffers compared to native resolution. I’ve seen a few screenshots of other games where DLSS 2.0 arguable improved some aspect of image quality, but it tends to negatively impact it somewhere else.

  5. Cyberpunk 2077 is a very bad example of DLSS. DLSS relies heavily on TAA implementation in the game, and Cyberpunk 2077’s TAA implementation is notoriously bad. Therefore, that being tied to it, it worsens DLSS from its potential.

    There are other games that demonstrate DLSS better.

    However, that is one thing to note about DLSS, it relies on temporal vectors, so the implementation of that in games will affect its quality. But at least it can do it, whereas FSR is spatial only at the moment.

  6. Cyberpunk 2077 is a very bad example of DLSS. DLSS relies heavily on TAA implementation in the game, and Cyberpunk 2077’s TAA implementation is notoriously bad. Therefore, that being tied to it, it worsens DLSS from its potential.

    There are other games that demonstrate DLSS better.

    However, that is one thing to note about DLSS, it relies on temporal vectors, so the implementation of that in games will affect its quality. But at least it can do it, whereas FSR is spatial only at the moment.

    Thanks for the explanations on the differences between the two. Most of my gaming in the last couple of years has focused on games with DLSS and I’ve noticed the anomalies throughout the generations. I’ve recently been replaying RE Village and taking a closer note of FSR and its behavior since it wasn’t around when I played it the first time.

  7. Excellent take, also very surprising on 6900XT RT performance. I think as newer games with RT come out, the disparity for AMD and Nvidia on performance will drift closer together. Still I think Nvidia will remain on top due to larger bandwidth memory as well as more compute units. AMD speed demons do help compensate as well as Infinity Cache (really a 256bit memory bus with slower memory being in the ballpark does speak highly on AMD design even beit slower at this time).
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