Image: Valve

Twitter user Belly Jelly rose to fame last week when they discovered and shared a way of expanding a Steam Deck’s M.2 2230 slot to an M.2 2242 one, prompting owners who weren’t afraid of experimenting with the device to open their handhelds up to install some M.2 adapters that would enable the support of longer, 2242 SSDs. Steam Deck designer Lawrence Yang has now taken to the same social media platform to denounce this modification, warning owners of the portable that doing so could result in overheating problems, something that is apparently sure to lead to a shortened lifespan. “Please don’t do this,” Yang pleaded after reading PC Gamer’s coverage on the subject and explaining that the charger IC would get very hot if the system’s thermal pads were moved. Yang also warned that the increased power demands of most M.2 2242 drives would result in a hotter-running system.

Hot Hardware brought the modder’s Twitter overview to our attention, where we learned that the new SSD “doesn’t collide with anything on the motherboard or put any extra strain on any cables.” Somewhat worryingly, though, the mod did “make the heat spreader bow a tiny bit.”

For anyone wondering which SSD the modder went with, its a 512GB KingSpec PCIe 3.0 x2 that tops out at around 1100 MB/s. Sadly there’s still no way to jam one of the best NVMe SSDs(opens in new tab) in there, since they come in at a standard 2280 form factor, but at least the 2242’s are a little easier to get hold of(opens in new tab) than 2230 NVMe SSDs are. Which could make sticking 1TB of storage into your Deck pretty simple.

Source: Lawrence Yang

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1 comment

  1. Hmm.


    Interesting.

    I've noticed that NVMe drives usually have multiple power states.

    Here are th epower states my new 2TB Samsung 980 Pro reports to Smart:
    Supported Power States
    St Op     Max   Active     Idle   RL RT WL WT  Ent_Lat  Ex_Lat
     0 +     8.49W       -        -    0  0  0  0        0       0
     1 +     4.48W       -        -    1  1  1  1        0     200
     2 +     3.18W       -        -    2  2  2  2        0    1000
     3 -   0.0400W       -        -    3  3  3  3     2000    1200
     4 -   0.0050W       -        -    4  4  4  4      500    9500

    Here is the 1TB 970 EVO
    Supported Power States
    St Op     Max   Active     Idle   RL RT WL WT  Ent_Lat  Ex_Lat
     0 +     6.20W       -        -    0  0  0  0        0       0
     1 +     4.30W       -        -    1  1  1  1        0       0
     2 +     2.10W       -        -    2  2  2  2        0       0
     3 -   0.0400W       -        -    3  3  3  3      210    1200
     4 -   0.0050W       -        -    4  4  4  4     2000    8000

    And here is my ancient 400GB Intel SSD750 which apparently only has one super high power state and is pinned at it all the time:
    Supported Power States
    St Op     Max   Active     Idle   RL RT WL WT  Ent_Lat  Ex_Lat
     0 +    25.00W       -        -    0  0  0  0        0       0

    My reason for posting all of this was, I wonder if you can force the drive into a lower power state manually, so it cna be used in something like the Steam Deck and have a lower power draw that is not a problem...

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